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Black Women Express Outrage Over New "tone Deaf," "white-washed" Sheamoisture Ad

Mingus

Well-Known Member
and for the only good hair product they ever made


Ha!!! This is the first Shea Moisture product I ever owned. Bought it once and could never find it again. I don't like any of their products now and in discussion with my husband I was trying to explain to him this product and how it was the only one I purchased worth anything. They are probably too big to make something like this anymore.
I was never really a user of their products, but y'all make this stuff sound interesting. Obviously, this was from their old product line, but I tracked down the list of ingredients if anyone wants to try reverse engineering this and sharing with the class.

Ingredients:
Shea Butter, Deionized Water, Herbal Complex, Panthenol, Centromonium Chloride*, Glycerin, Cocoa Butter, Aloe Vera, Jojoba Oil, Vitamin E


*Cetrimonium chloride, or cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, is a topical antiseptic and surfactant. It is also commonly used in hair conditioners and shampoos, as a conditioning agent.
Formula: C19H42ClN
Molar Mass: 320 g/mol

Obviously, the "Herbal Complex" could be anything, but there are any number of hair healthy herbs that one could infuse to include in a conditioner. Also, remember that ingredients are typically listed in order by weight from most to least predominant.
 

Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
This is what Whitney (Naptural85) had to say:


ETA: She continued in the comments section (see attachment).

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

She was the same one caping for that Vincenzo "stylist" that butchered a Youtuber's head of hair. She is also clearly lying on not being an ambassador for any product. If you're under contract you're an ambassador, boo. She is paid to promote products.
 

MilkChocolateOne

Well-Known Member
Naptural85 said so much and nothing at the same time.

@Mingus @MilkChocolateOne ive still seen that one in Harlem. You'd be surprised what you find there. I never tried that one, but that packaging in particular had good products. They were very simple and effective. I liked the body wash and it lasted longer than their commercial items.

I've seen it locally at one of the African shops. I am afraid to purchase it because I think it might be old stock. Shea butter doesn't work well in our hair but this was one of the few shea butter based product we could use without any issues. The old body washes and lotions were awesome. I was so disappointed when I tried their new body products. They are no where near as good as the previous ones. I could use the old products but the new ones causes itching and irritation. I suspect it's whatever they are using for fragrance now. I liked the jbco shampoo but I stopped purchasing because the shampoo would coagulate after a month or so. I stored it in a cool dark place and it would still happen. Honestly, I basically stopped supporting them when they went mainstream. I didn't like most of the new products. They didn't perform well and they smell awful.
 

MilkChocolateOne

Well-Known Member
Naptural85 said so much and nothing at the same time.

translation: "no comment, I have to protect my coins. I don't want to offend my fan base with my opinion and my decision to support/not support shea moisture and I don't want to sabotage future business opportunities with this company or any other company in the future."

I knew she would respond this way. honestly I expected her not to address it at all.
 

HappilyLiberal

Well-Known Member
See, this is why ppl don't want to deal with (certain) black women. EVERY GOTTAME THING HAS TO BE A CIVIL RIGHTS ISSUE.

This is a freaking hair product! It has nothing to do with anyone being kicked out of school, denied access to sit in the front of the bus or denied employment. It is and has been sold in places like ULTA and TARGET for awhile giving everyone who shops ULTA access to it.

I mean, when was the last time SM showed up at a BLM rally or publicly defended a black child against school discrimination or bailed a wrongly accused somebody out of jail? Did SM ever stand up for Trayvon Martin, Philando Castile or Sandra Bland?

Better yet, when did they ever pledge their undying loyalty to black women and black dollars?

So, whether you like it or not, when it comes to the insignificant things in life, like a hair product, ww have voices and insecurities, too. White women hate their hair, think they're fat and envy bronze skin. And capitalistic ventures are going to cash in on it.

Swear, some of ya'll act like you were married to SM and he just up and divorced you for a white girl. SMDH

You know what Boo boo... if you want to continue to support Shea Moisture, go right ahead... do you boo! But me and mine will not be supporting them!
 

IronButterfly

Well-Known Member
You know what Boo boo... if you want to continue to support Shea Moisture, go right ahead... do you boo! But me and mine will not be supporting them!
You know what, Boo-boo? I've never supported Shea Moisture because I think their products suck! You know what else, Boo boo... ain't no body losing sleep about you what you put on your hair.
 

Mingus

Well-Known Member
Naptural85 said so much and nothing at the same time.

@Mingus @MilkChocolateOne ive still seen that one in Harlem. You'd be surprised what you find there. I never tried that one, but that packaging in particular had good products. They were very simple and effective. I liked the body wash and it lasted longer than their commercial items.
Oh, I have no intention of purchasing any of their products, even if I did live anywhere near Harlem. (I live all the way across the country.) I just thought if the product were good enough it might be worth replicating for those who consider themselves to be kitchen mixtresses. I dabble in mixtressing, so I may try my hand at making a batch of my own down the road.
 

Saludable84

Better Late Than Ugly
Oh, I have no intention of purchasing any of their products, even if I did live anywhere near Harlem. (I live all the way across the country.) I just thought if the product were good enough it might be worth replicating for those who consider themselves to be kitchen mixtresses. I dabble in mixtressing, so I may try my hand at making a batch of my own down the road.

Trust me, I'm already thinking :look:
 

Mingus

Well-Known Member
translation: "no comment, I have to protect my coins. I don't want to offend my fan base with my opinion and my decision to support/not support shea moisture and I don't want to sabotage future business opportunities with this company or any other company in the future."

I knew she would respond this way. honestly I expected her not to address it at all.
Honestly, I'm not mad at her for her response. She does generally try to remain neutral on most stuff like this. We got crickets from her when that whole Curly Nikki thing popped off, and I personally was happy that she stayed out of it. To this day Mahogany Curls still gets major side eye from a lot of people, myself included, over her "all hair matters" stance at that time. So, it's hard for me to fault Naptural for her generally more cautious approach in an attempt to stay out of mine fields.

Apparently, she had already shot the ad for them prior to all of this jumping off, so she was going to have to address this one at some point anyway. I can at least appreciate the fact that she made no comment on what other people should or shouldn't do, or how anyone else should feel, with regard to this company. She focused her message on her own reaction and what she planned to do going forward. I can respect that even if I don't completely agree with it.
 

MilkChocolateOne

Well-Known Member
Honestly, I'm not mad at her for her response. She does generally try to remain neutral on most stuff like this. We got crickets from her when that whole Curly Nikki thing popped off, and I personally was happy that she stayed out of it. To this day Mahogany Curls still gets major side eye from a lot of people, myself included, over her "all hair matters" stance at that time. So, it's hard for me to fault Naptural for her generally more cautious approach in an attempt to stay out of mine fields.

Apparently, she had already shot the ad for them prior to all of this jumping off, so she was going to have to address this one at some point anyway. I can at least appreciate the fact that she made no comment on what other people should or shouldn't do, or how anyone else should feel, with regard to this company. She focused her message on her own reaction and what she planned to do going forward. I can respect that even if I don't completely agree with it.

I agree, she's consistent.
 

Froreal3

haulin hard in the paint
OMG!!! I am sooo freaking forgetful, it JUST clicked Nubian Heritage, that lil whole in wall shop where Bath and Body has replaced on 2 5th back in day... Surely that lil mom and pop shop is not the same as Shea Moisture.. Tis it is... these ****'s got new. yall say the board and reps are White back in day they were all black...

I am mad, their lotions were the truth.com, still have two bottles,throwing away nah babe..
Yes ma'am it is. Nubian Heritage also had a small arse little location on Flatbush in BK baaack in the day. We were buying from them back then...they sold books, oils, incense and a whole bunch of other stuff along with their bar soaps, lotions and things too. They truly are trippin in this situation. I love that their expanding, but to include white women with straight hair (nary a Jew fro in sight) in our narrative of struggle with our hair is not ok.
 

Froreal3

haulin hard in the paint
PettyOp: People are bumping this video on FB.. LMAO
---

"Every strand is a testimony to our history, that makes us stronger." Pantene celebrates the beautiful strength of African American hair. Because #StrongIsBeautiful

That vid by Pantene taking advantage of SheaMoisture's *** up is kinda effed up, but I know it's business. It's kind of not fair because unlike SheaMoisture, Pantene can literally afford to make a video like this and still make bank.
 

Froreal3

haulin hard in the paint
Pantene isn't taking advantage of anything. Their commercial was released last month.
Oh ok. Well I still think that Pantene can do something like this because they are already a huge brand. I do think that SheaMoisture could have done this as well without alienating black women.
 

Tefnut

Well-Known Member
Nubian Heritage has begun changing the formulation of its soaps. I like its African Black soap for my face but noticed that it's been repackaged and has more chemical ingredients added. The all natural ingredients that made it awesome are now listed further down among Yellow this, Blue that and sodium something or other. I returned them. Customers complained about other Nubian Heritage soaps' formulation changes on Amazon.

Yes ma'am it is. Nubian Heritage also had a small arse little location on Flatbush in BK baaack in the day. We were buying from them back then...they sold books, oils, incense and a whole bunch of other stuff along with their bar soaps, lotions and things too. They truly are trippin in this situation. I love that their expanding, but to include white women with straight hair (nary a Jew fro in sight) in our narrative of struggle with our hair is not ok.
 

Tefnut

Well-Known Member
I understand why some black women feel a type of way and these incidents where many black women feel undervalued and ignored (e.g., John Ridley's Guerilla and Shea Moisture) point to a bigger issue that I won't even get into now.

I agree with your point.

Nonblack-owned companies have been making money off of black people for years. If this majority black-owned company wants to make money off of others, then they should. I do think that ad was trash though. It seemed more patronizing than anything because Sundial Brands, Shea Moisture's and Nubian Heritages parent company, started out to "address skin and hair care issues traditionally ignored by mass market companies." In other words, it was created to address the skin and beauty needs of black women and black men (or POC) and the white women featured in that ad, based on what they shared, don't fit into that category. The marketing team should've familiarized itself with the company's history, mission statement and customer base.

I don't see the difference. Shea Moisture now wants EVERYONE's coins, fail to see the issue
 

FelaShrine

Well-Known Member
I understand why some black women feel a type of way and these incidents where many black women feel undervalued and ignored (e.g., John Ridley's Guerilla and Shea Moisture) point to a bigger issue that I won't even get into now.

I agree with your point.

Nonblack-owned companies have been making money off of black people for years. If this majority black-owned company wants to make money off of others, then they should. I do think that ad was trash though. It seemed more patronizing than anything because Sundial Brands, Shea Moisture's and Nubian Heritages parent company, started out to "address skin and hair care issues traditionally ignored by mass market companies." In other words, it was created to address the skin and beauty needs of black women and black men (or POC) and the white women featured in that ad, based on what they shared, don't fit into that category. The marketing team should've familiarized itself with the company's history, mission statement and customer base.

There were multiple ads made though, the others had "true" black women and all so I still dont find the whining necessary imo *shrugs*

Fashion houses have been making money off black women for years despite the fact that they rarely feature black women in ads or anything cept for a few like YSL, yet black business cant go after white money? please.
 

Tefnut

Well-Known Member
I understand and am not arguing for or against that.

I still think that particular ads' wording in the script came across as forced. That's my opinion.

Eh, it's not my battle as I've gotten the majority of my Shea Moisture products in gift bags and only used the lotions and soaps. But, as I previously said, the "whining" is indicative of a deeper issue that I won't address now. I will say that I find the whole idea of the "natural hair movement," the obession with hair typing, the "my hair is a struggle and deserves special attention" narrative along with other things to be ... rudimentary and exhausting. This Shea Moisture fallout and responses to it is an example.

Again, I think black businesses should get money! You are right about fashion houses. Black women were running around spending their last dime on Prada items when it hadn't featured a black model in its show in over a decade.



There were multiple ads made though, the others had "true" black women and all so I still dont find the whining necessary imo *shrugs*

Fashion houses have been making money off black women for years despite the fact that they rarely feature black women in ads or anything cept for a few like YSL, yet black business cant go after white money? please.
 
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vevster

Well-Known Member
:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

She was the same one caping for that Vincenzo "stylist" that butchered a Youtuber's head of hair. She is also clearly lying on not being an ambassador for any product. If you're under contract you're an ambassador, boo. She is paid to promote products.

Vincenzo messed up MY hair too! He doesn't listen. I had a consult, brought pictures and he just did his own thing. Which you tuber's hair did he butcher? He did the fancy face's hair and she wasn't happy either.
 

IronButterfly

Well-Known Member
I understand and am not arguing for or against that.

I still think that particular ads' wording in the script came across as forced. That's my opinion.

Eh, it's not my battle as I've gotten the majority of my Shea Moisture products in gift bags and only used the lotions and soaps. But, as I previously said, the "whining" is indicative of a deeper issue that I won't address now. I will say that I find the whole idea of the "natural hair movement," the obession with hair typing, the "my hair is a struggle and deserves special attention" narrative along with other things to be ... rudimentary and exhausting. This Shea Moisture fallout and responses to it is an example.

Again, I think black businesses should get money! You are right about fashion houses. Black women were running around spending their last dime on Prada items when it hadn't featured a black model in its show in over a decade.
OOh can I get yo' autograph cuz you is a SUPER-STAR! Your post is right on time. Thank you thank you thank you!!!!!
 
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