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Black Women failing black women

Kiowa

Well-Known Member
don't know if it was posted before...I still have memories of leaving salons at 2am in the morning..:nono: but reminded myself that going 'natural' was right for me..

http://atlantablackstar.com/2012/06/25/black-hair-salons-failing-black-women/

Let me paint you a picture. For many of you, it is a picture that will look familiar; a picture that describes the humiliation and fury millions of black women feel on a regular basis all across America. Your hair is in need of professional attention, so you head to your favorite salon. You get there and you take a seat in the waiting area. And you wait. And you wait. And…
Finally, you’re taken to the shampoo bowl, where you wait some more. Eventually, your hair gets washed and conditioned. And you wait—with a wet head. All the while, you listen to inane conversation not fit for public consumption.
And the music? You might as well be at the local night club.
So much time passes that you become anxious.
You finally are ushered to the dryer, where you sit until the timer goes off. Then you sit and watch client after client go to your stylist’s chair to be serviced. You wonder where you fit in, whether you’ve been bypassed for someone with an appointment after yours.
Now you’re more than just anxious; now you’re angry. Angry and hungry. Just when you’re about to lose it, you get called over to the stylist’s chair. But it’s almost too late. You’re infuriated, disgusted and, above all, disappointed.
By the time you have been styled and stop at the front desk to pay, you’ve been there for six hours.
This is where black hair salons have, for decades, failed black women.
Visiting the salon should be a pleasant, peaceful experience, not an hours-on-end drudgery that leaves you fighting mad—and wondering why you put up with such disrespect of your time.
And yet, this is what millions of black women endure to get our hair professionally done.
It is a failure of gigantic proportions. It is a failure that is sad because black women are failing black women. This has nothing to do with relaxers vs. natural hair. But it has everything to do with respect.
If there is anyone who should be operating with the best interest of black women in mind, it should be other black women. There is not another industry in the world where black women dominate and can set its rules and regulations.
But what we get is blatant disrespect of our time, without any trace of remorse. These places go about business in this ridiculous way, as if that is the way it should be, as if it is all right, acceptable.
Well, it isn’t. But it will not end until we, as women, as clients, demand that our time be respected. We certainly don’t send the right message when we go back the next week and endure it again—only because we like the way that particular person styles our hair. How silly is that?
I know because I did the same silly thing for years. Before I became owner of Like The River The Salon in Atlanta, I was a client, and my stylist would not be there for my scheduled time or she would take a break before styling my hair or gossip on the phone when she finally did service me. And I was foolish enough to take it.
It took a man to snap me out of the madness. He said one day, “You spent how long in the salon? Six hours? Why do you tolerate that?” And that was all it took. I knew there had to be a better way.
After a 16-year corporate career, I followed my passion and pursued a career in hair. In 2008, when I opened Like The River, I opened it with two core principles: community service and customer service.
This is not a self-serving position. I simply did not want to fail other black women. We deserve better, especially from each other. In the hair business, we have the power. We can establish professional standards that make the salon an oasis and not a place of discomfort and frustration.
To break it down, we’ve got to do better. But how, when most stylists never worked in a “real” job where they were required to be on time, dress professionally, conduct business in a respectful manner? They get into hair as a youngster and fall right into the disrespectful habits of those before them—and stay there. Those habits include showing up late or not showing up at all, double and sometimes triple-booking appointments to “get the money” and having an attitude that they are doing the paying customer a favor.
In order to change the culture, the clients have to demand it. Do not put up with the madness. Accepting it only enables the bad behavior. Express your concerns to ownership, threaten to take your business elsewhere. And if there is no change, then find another salon.
I had to issue fines to my stylists for lateness . . . until it became a part of their makeup that they be there waiting for their clients, not the other way around. We do not allow double-booking—that compounds the problem. And we operate on the idea that coming to our salon is a break from work, family, kids, men, and so we create an environment of peace.
The failure of black women by black women has to stop. And, really, it is up to you, the clients, to make it happen.
 

Pennefeather

Well-Known Member
Awesome! I wish more salons were run where each stylist had one customer at a time. It is insane to spend hours there.
 

GoldenRule

Well-Known Member
All very valid sentiments but the phrasing is way too strong. People waste my time in a multitude of ways...right down to my physician. It's disappointing. It's disrespectful. Failing me though? Ehhhh...many more important issues in life. It's only hair. If it bothers me to any great extent and I make a repeat visit or neglect to mention the fact that they have wasted my time then I am "failing" myself.
 

greenandchic

Well-Known Member
If anything the salon owners/hairdressers are failing themselves. I hate that I went to a white lady a few years ago to give me a Diva cut and color and was out of there and had my entire late morning/afternoon to myself. There was no one else in the shop, she had me facing the large mirror as she cut and I didn't lose a ton of hair when she combed me out.
 

naturalmanenyc

Well-Known Member
When I was going to the salon regularly for touch ups/fusion weave, I went on Mondays. The shop was closed and I was the only customer.

I will say that I have been in and out of that same salon on a Saturday within 90 minutes (relaxed and curled). I still remember that ONE time because I made a joke and my stylist laughed, sort of. lol I started booking 7 am appointments for Saturdays after a while and eventually went to Mondays.

I don't mind double booking depending on my service. If my service requires one on one attention (color, weave, relaxer) then I don't expect the stylist to work on another customer until I'm under the dryer.
 
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claud-uk

Well-Known Member
All valid points above, however the stylists fail us first by engaging in this seemingly acceptable (pattern) of behaviour but we then fail ourselves by a: saying nothing and b: going back time after time.

As the expression goes "fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on ME".
 

Saludable84

Better Late Than Ugly
One of the last times I really went to a salon, I was there for 8 hours. I was so upset. I was there from 8am thinking I was one of the first people and left around 4pm. And I only got a wash and set. She apologized that it took so long but hair stylist too have to better manage their clients. She didn't do appts but I think she would have benefitted from it. Another girl I went to that did do appts didn't have me there long but made sure her appts were given priority.
 

TopShelf

Sewing & Growing Gamma Gal
You fail yourself if you continuously go to salons where you sit for hours.

I was about to say the same thing.

I once went to a new stylist who I had made an appt with. She asked if another person could get in front of me and i said, "Sure, I have to go and pay the meter" and left and never went back.

I try and stick with who I know after many years of disappointment.
 

Sade'

Well-Known Member
I remember going to the salon arriving early and the doors were locked. No one in sight. I waited for 20 minutes and left. Of course as soon as I got in the car she called I didn't go back.

Another time I was sitting and waiting while watching my stylist try and juggle 3 people. She was clearly overwhelmed. So I told her I'd come back another day. I wasn't up for all the chaos.

Salon visits have become so stressful. Which is why I only go 4 times a year max.

Sent from my iPhone using LHCF
 

Naveah2050

Well-Known Member
This is why I want natural - I can't put myself through that again and when I do go to the salon I go to my bougie white stylist in a bougie part of town who has me in and out in two hours or less.
 

Charlie555

Well-Known Member
The salon I went to from 2001-2009 had shampoo assistants for all the stylist. I loved it! You came in, put on a smock & you were in the shampoo bowl or getting prepped for a relaxer within 15-20 minutes of walking in the door. The whole visit would last around an hour and a half maybe more for a relaxer.
Then the owner passed & it went downhill from there. The length of the visits kept getting longer. I decided to start going mid day on Wednesdays or Thursdays. Do you know I would still spend HOURS in there! And let's not talk about the few times I had to wait for the stylist to get there.

That's when I gave up & left them.
 

Maracujá

November 2020 --> 14 years natural!!!
All very valid sentiments but the phrasing is way too strong. People waste my time in a multitude of ways...right down to my physician. It's disappointing. It's disrespectful. Failing me though? Ehhhh...many more important issues in life. It's only hair. If it bothers me to any great extent and I make a repeat visit or neglect to mention the fact that they have wasted my time then I am "failing" myself.

I agree with you to a certain degree, I came here expecting to read about something totally different. But she's right in some regards, as she stated: this is a field that Black women could be dominating. I was just thinking (and talking to myself about it:look:) yesterday since I'm celebrating my 8th nappiversary. I once waited 6 months to receive a product I ordered from Oyin handmade, when I enquired about the reason the owner simply stated that she had been pregnant. I understand dealing with difficulties as a brand new entrepreneur, but I believe that the area that most hinders the Black community when it comes to our economic advancement is customer service. Not too long ago someone started a thread about this (not sure if it was CaraWalker). It's disheartening really.
 

GoldenRule

Well-Known Member
I agree with you to a certain degree, I came here expecting to read about something totally different. But she's right in some regards, as she stated: this is a field that Black women could be dominating. I was just thinking (and talking to myself about it:look:) yesterday since I'm celebrating my 8th nappiversary. I once waited 6 months to receive a product I ordered from Oyin handmade, when I enquired about the reason the owner simply stated that she had been pregnant. I understand dealing with difficulties as a brand new entrepreneur, but I believe that the area that most hinders the Black community when it comes to our economic advancement is customer service. Not too long ago someone started a thread about this (not sure if it was CaraWalker). It's disheartening really.

It's a field where black women are dominating and have since the press 'n curl. For the most part, black women use black stylists exclusively -- even if that includes a 6-hr wait! I was wondering the other day about how stylists were making ends meet lately with the mass exodus of their relaxed clients. It has to have hurt business. Maybe that's why weave pricing has skyrocketed.

I'm not defending piss poor service. She was right in many regards. It can definitely improve. But as a reader (I do not look at much tv -- I rely heavily on written reports). I skim headlines here and there and everywhere -- I cannot possibly read them ALL, my mind see and records things like "iPhone 6+ BENDING" and I'll think ok, iPhone 6+ is CRAP. I may read it and find out or I may skip it but I leave with a negative impression of the iPhone 6+. So when I see "Black Women Failing", the 1st thing I think of is...AGAIN? Who did we piss off NOW?! And I open it looking for something deep about how we should help each other more with childcare so we can excel or something and it's some hair shyte...lol. Had I NOT really read it, I would have just been left with the "Black Women Failing" impression. It's a media trick and they do it to us all the time. WE shouldn't do it to each other. Maybe something in the title about SALON +10-hr wait, blah blah blah would have been more appropriate IMO. We get enough bad press without folks blowing sh*t out of proportion.
 

krissyhair

Well-Known Member
This seems like a long advertisement for her salon, with a negative spin on other salons. It It reminds me of an election season commercial to me.

Come to my salon because the other ones are "failing you" and I've implemented all of the customer service basics.
 

starchgirl

Well-Known Member
I stopped going to traditional salons after I was having to leave work early for a 2pm appt for a touch up and rollerset and I still didn't get out the chair until 7pm.

I switched to a stylist who only worked on one client at a time and charged by the hour. I would be done in 90 minutes. Best customer service ever!
 

BostonMaria

Well-Known Member
Good for her for opening up her own salon and having great customer service. I used to waste my whole Saturday at the salon waiting for the hairdresser to stop dancing bachata and gossiping with her friends LOL

I fixed this "wasting my life away" problem by doing my own hair and going to the salon maybe 2-3x a YEAR.
 

Nefertiti0906

Well-Known Member
I go to a black stylist in a chain salon (Bubbles). I'm in and out in under 90 minutes and I've been her only customer in all but 1 occasion.
 

BostonMaria

Well-Known Member
I go to a black stylist in a chain salon (Bubbles). I'm in and out in under 90 minutes and I've been her only customer in all but 1 occasion.

Wow you're very lucky! I used to walk into the salon at 9am and leave around 1pm. It would ruin my Saturdays and my son would cry LOL
 

Renewed1

Well-Known Member
which is why I haven't stepped foot in a salon in ten years

Me 2....until rcently. My appointment was for 12pm the stylist didnt show up u til 1pm and she had two people in front of me.

So I wasted an afternoon and got a bad haircut.

Never again! I go to JCP or Hair cutlery. Best service yet!
 

cocosweet

Well-Known Member
I've been to a salon 2x in 15 years. I got tired of the long waits due to overbooking and the stylist acting like they are doing you a favor attitude. It sucks because I would really love to have someone else I could trust to do my hair right now.
 

Lynnerie

Well-Known Member
Not only is the wait bad but going there and getting your hair ripped out with fine tooth combs, bad chemical applications, overpriced services, and getting hair chopped off when you ask for a trim. That's my main issue. I haven't been to a salon in years!
 

gabulldawg

Well-Known Member
The black salons are crazy. Like others have said I haven't stepped foot in one in years. The last time I needed my hair cut I went to a "white" salon. I don't have time for foolishness. :nono:
 

cynd

Well-Known Member
A good salon is hard to find ... PERIOD. Some people are good stylists but bad business people, while others are good business people but bad stylists. The key to is to find the best of both worlds and that, unfortunately, is not easy.
 

pearcey

Well-Known Member
Before going natural, I have happy memories of the salon.

It was fun to get an early in on a Thursday or get up and get going on a Saturday...

I had a great stylist, she was Christian, and even when I went natural the last time, was able to do my hair in a way that hid my thin edges.

Everyone should be introduced to their natural texture, but the haughty attitudes upon having natural hair need to stop.

I had the "attitude" too. It is probably just a coming of age, but I hope no stylist loses a meal just cuz some want to go natural.
 
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