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Black women site hair as impediment to working out

MizAvalon

Well-Known Member
I thought having relaxed hair was supposed to make things easier? I'm not sure how - ESP if your hair is bone straight - it's so hard to do a quick rinse in the shower, throw it up in a bun, and go. Even if you let it air dry in a low pony, wouldn't it be mostly straight? :ohwell:

When I was texlaxed, I would wash at the gym, scrunch in some aussie leave in conditioning mousse and GO. Maybe if more black women knew how to be more " hands on" with their own heads, they wouldn't feel so helpless when it came to taking care of it. :yep:

I think that's a huge part of the problem. Most black women are so dependent on hairdressers that their style has to last an entire week, maybe two.
 

MizAvalon

Well-Known Member
I did, she said we were a bunch of amateurs, so why would she take advice from a bunch of women who don't know any more than she does...

To make a long story short, she was very insulting and after giving her a piece of my mind, she left:nuts:


Girl, you know we have to ask. How does her hair look?
 

Divine_Order

New Member
This is when braidouts comes in handy. I MUST wash my hair after every workout (I work out hard!:lachen:)So I come home, wash, condition, braid while in the shower, and let it dry overnight. I do it all over again the next day. It's not that much of a big deal to me, in fact me doing this has helped me get ready quicker in the morning. All I have to do is unbraid and go!:grin:
 

CandacyEliz

New Member
I cancelled my gym membership a week ago. I attributed alot of things to the decision such as the recently released convict club that hung out there & the long wait for machines but I'm sure my hair had ALOT to do with it also. It is just so thick that dealing with the aftermath was a nightmare...

I am planning to do more strength/resistance exercises at home so I won't sweat as much... hopefully I won't fall off :ohwell:

I agree w/ the poster that said they'd rather be slim w/ jacked up hair than overweight/obese w/ fly hair :yep:
 

Buttercreme

Active Member
I exercise first thing in the morning, which means my satin scarf is still on. I leave the scarf on until I shower and dress for the day. When I remove it, my hair is not soaking wet and I get a pretty good workout for at least 30 mins.

I also wash frequently during exercise week (1-2 co-washes and weekly deep condition), but I do so mainly at night so I can air-dry overnite. This cuts down on heat damage and over-manipulation.

It's so sad that alot of my friends and family have this mentality impeding their working out:ohwell:. But then again, they have no knowledge regarding hair care
 

Amarech

New Member
When I was texlaxed, I would wash at the gym, scrunch in some aussie leave in conditioning mousse and GO. Maybe if more black women knew how to be more " hands on" with their own heads, they wouldn't feel so helpless when it came to taking care of it.
:yep::yep::yep:

You have to be at that point. I need to lose 50 lbs. I love to exercise hard, until I break a sweat, but I have to think about my hair just like every other black woman, relaxed or natural.

If I know I must exercise, but can't afford to sweat out my hair, I'll do low intensity workout for a longer period of time and weight train. When it comes time to wash my hair, I'll go crazy on the elliptical for a couple of days. Problem solved.

it can be done....
 

ricochet

Member
I think that's a huge part of the problem. Most black women are so dependent on hairdressers that their style has to last an entire week, maybe two.

DITTO. Sorry to hijack but it still amazes me how many black women I come across who DO NOT wash their hair at home! They go and get it "done" every week/two weeks. My Mom taught me how to wash/deep condition my hair at home in the year 1990, the year I got a relaxer and turned 13 years old. It wasn't even a case of hair health because my Mom is not a hair stylist, but knows the value of a dollar :). Mom paid for my retouches and bought me cholesterol deep conditioners from K-Mart and told me to use the dc every once in awhile. Since I had no desire for the fiingerwaves, freezes, etc that the girls used to wear, my hair stayed in a rollerset after my retouch and curling iron style after a blow dry every other day until my next retouch, which I would get every 2-3 months.

Don't even get me started on "folx" using their electric/water bill money to go and get their "hurr" done. :mad: :perplexed
 

nodisrespect

New Member
I think y'all are being a little harsh. It's easy to say "oh they could just co wash and air dry and wear a ponytail" but that would be purposely omitting the main reason why black people have such poor hair care in the first place - MOST DON'T WANT TO HAVE LESS THAN STRAIGHT HAIR! Are we forgetting that to most black people, curly hair is "nappy", ponytails aren't "done" hair, and the proper way to walk around is with flat ironed, straightened, wrapped hair? It probably isn't that people don't know they COULD do other things or have alternative options; we all know damn well it's because people don't WANT to wear their hair like that.

For me personally, when I didn't go to the gym it was because I was lazy and didn't feel like it. When I started going, I had a sew in. Now even though I don't wear them anymore, I still keep going because I know how good I feel after going to the gym and how beneficial it is to me, to my life, my health, and my overall moods. I am going through a very frustrating and irritating time in life and going to the gym is one of the few things that keeps me from stabbing somebody.

I don't care if other black women don't go - I can't care. It's the same useless energy as concerning yourself with their hair care; they aren't going to listen to you and you'd just be working yourself up for nothing trying to convince them something different than what they already think. The way I feel about it, let em not go - I'll be even more of a hot commodity, long hair that's MINE and in great shape.
 

LunadeMiel

Well-Known Member
It really a shame when hair will get in the way of a healthy lifestyle..:nono: As for myself, I workout regularly and go swimming every saturday. My hair thanks me for it...:yep:
 

Raspberry

New Member
I'm bad and am not working out as I should be. But I will admit that when I did my hair was a hassle. I had to wash every other work out and so detangle every other workout. by my workout schedule, this meant twice a week. If I felt like working out again, I wouldn't let this stop me, but I will admit it was a hassle. I think I might able to detangle just once a week if I wear twists, though. I really need to start working out again.


Yep, hair is an issue depending on your post-wash styling regimen. When I was relaxed and working out frequently I didn't know anything about LHCF and washed my hair once a week. It probably didn't look that great in between but I just kept it in a low bun or wrap most of the time.

When I as a loose natural I didn't work out that much anyways lol but twists were the only style I was ok with rinsing frequently.. but even still I didn't like having to accept frizzy twists because of work-outs esp after 6 hour twisting sessions.

Now with locs I'm working out a lot more .. I rinse/wash frequently and don't mind the fuzz much - I just smooth or twist the locs around my edges after a wash and KIM...
 

Raspberry

New Member
I agree.
It ain't that serious to not workout over some hair.
Whether I was relaxed, loc'd or a loose natural, I still get my workout on. I would also get in the pool too. It's only hair, if your health ain't in check, then your hairstyle ain't gonna matter :rolleyes:

This is definitely true tho - gotta see the big picture. When I think about the times I didn't go to the gym tryin to keep a fresh style I'm like :nono: ... I'd trade most of those days with tight styles for ones with a slim toned body sans back fat and chubby cheeks lol.
 

Optimus_Prime

Well-Known Member
I've gone to the gym 6 days a week this summer. I just cowash, and use some baking soda if my scalp feels dirty. I will admit that I don't like styling damp hair in the morning, but it's not the end of the world. I should really get to bed earlier, and that's doable.
 

CurlyMoo

Well-Known Member
The study was presented recently at the Fourth International Symposium of the L’Oréal Institute for Ethnic Hair & Skin Research by fourth-year medical student Shani Smith, MBA. Other investigators include Melicia Whitt-Glover, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Kismet Loftin-Bell, MALS, MSL, research associate, and medical student Rebecca Hall.

:look: Wait a cotton pickin' nano-second, isn't L’Oréal that racist organization that hates anything other than white? ummmm, even though it's true Black women do have their hair issues, I'll be taking this study with a grain of salt, a peppermint stick and a dill pickle. :sekret:

http://www.longhaircareforum.com/showthread.php?t=377101
 
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Raspberry

New Member
:look: Wait a cotton pickin' nano-second, isn't L’Oréal that racist organization that hates anything other than white? ummmm, even though it's true Black women do have their hair issues, I'll be taking this study with a grain of salt, a peppermint stick and a dill pickle. :sekret:

http://www.longhaircareforum.com/showthread.php?t=377101

Lol, I hear you .. but even though L'Oreal's marketing unit sucks I'm not gonna dismiss their R&D (research and development) findings too quickly.. plus med student Shani Smith is probably black.. which is pretty ironic.
 

Pandora1975

New Member
This falls in with something I was thinking the other day. This forum should be a basis for a "What Not to Wear" type show. We could find women that have hair issues and educate them on how to repair it. It could even be a group of women that get followed through their routines and maintenance over the course of a season. BTW, If this comes to pass, I want in. My idea! :brucelee:
 

Solitude

Well-Known Member
Yeah, hair never stopped me from working out, personally. Even as a teen when I ran cross country & track, I wore my hair down and bone straight everyday - I would just wrap it up or get braids for the season.

It's just excuses.
 

Live4Me

New Member
I am guilty of not working out if I just got my hair "done". However, since I haven't gone to the hair dresser to get a style since joining LHCF, I don't have that problem. I just wear buns now. So I feel their pain, especially if you wear your hair down and you are a "scalp sweater". It takes practice to keep your hair trained.
 

Raspberry

New Member
I am guilty of not working out if I just got my hair "done". However, since I haven't gone to the hair dresser to get a style since joining LHCF, I don't have that problem. I just wear buns now. So I feel their pain, especially if you wear your hair down and you are a "scalp sweater". It takes practice to keep your hair trained.

I sweat the most from my scalp.. there's nothing I can do about it, I just had to come to terms with it. I have to wash frequently when working out or else my scalp gets very itchy and the sebum/dirt build-up is out of this world. I can only get away with rinsing once or twice without shampoo...
 

PGirl

New Member
I have "sweat days" and "no sweat" workout days. I don't sweat alot when I lift weights, so I can do that on days I don't want to wash. I reserve my cardio for days when I have more time, which for me is the weekend. During those days, I just wear my hair in a ponytail or bun and I'm cool.

It is a struggle for black women to work out but if she really wants to do it, she will find a way.

Recently, however I found the answer to my dreams and that is the Brazilian Keratin Treatment. It has truly changed my life. I can wash my hair any day of the week and detangling is a breeze. I can wash and go with relaxed hair and still look cute as can be. I'm happy.
 

blue_flower

Well-Known Member
I've been going to the gym for years and I've had relaxed, natural, and texturized. It was difficult having long, thick natural year while working out and that's why I decided to texturize. I wash my hair after every 2 work outs; if I don't, my scalp will start to itch really bad. There's no point in having perfect hair if your overweight or obese and putting yourself at risk for other health problems.
 

GV-NA-GI-TLV-GE-I

New Member
Yikes! Sorry for the misspelling of "cite." :(

Directly copied from another post on np.com (just giving credit). I know that when I was relaxed, I also didn't know how to properly care for my hair post-workout. Maybe the LHCF ladies can write a booklet about how to workout with relaxed hair?:grin:

Taken from Sweet Potato Pie
Dermatologic Barriers to Exercise in Black Women


WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – About a third of black women cite complications of hair care as the reason they do not exercise or exercise less than they would like, according to Amy J. McMichael, M.D., the lead investigator of a study from Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

McMichael, associate professor of dermatology, specializes in hair and scalp diseases, ethnic and pigmented skin diseases, and general dermatology and skin care. “I see a lot of African American women in our clinic and had noticed how many of them are overweight. This puts these women at risk for hypertension, diabetes and other serious problems.”

In fact studies show that 77 percent of black women are overweight or obese, McMichael said. “I thought it would be interesting to look at what role their hair plays in their amount of exercise. Many African American women with coarser hair use either heat straighteners or chemical products to straighten their hair. Depending on how coarse or fragile their hair is, they can’t just wash their hair after exercise without having to go through the whole process again, and that can take hours. Over-washing fragile hair can make it break off easily.”

McMichael and the team of investigators from the Department of Dermatology, the Division of Public Health Sciences, and the medical school interviewed 103 black women about how much and what types of exercise they do, and the time, expense and complications of caring for their hair. Sixty-four of the respondents had relaxed their hair by various means.

All of the respondents believed it was important for them to exercise. And 50 percent stated that they considered changing their hair to make it easier to exercise.

“We have now identified the problem – hair care does seem to be a factor – and it is one that is not easily solvable. Somebody might say, ‘Oh, just cut your hair,’ but that does not make sense. We have to figure out ways to address this issue, get some African American women in a forum or group meeting and talk about this,” McMichael said. “This is just a first step.”

The study was presented recently at the Fourth International Symposium of the L’Oréal Institute for Ethnic Hair & Skin Research by fourth-year medical student Shani Smith, MBA. Other investigators include Melicia Whitt-Glover, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Kismet Loftin-Bell, MALS, MSL, research associate, and medical student Rebecca Hall.

Um, who says a workout has to be in a sweaty gym? You could garden, take a brisk stroll, walk on the beach, paint your house, a variety of things other than sweating in a gym. It's amazing how people think that health comes from a paid subscription to a gym. There's so muh more to do.
 

Raspberry

New Member
Um, who says a workout has to be in a sweaty gym? You could garden, take a brisk stroll, walk on the beach, paint your house, a variety of things other than sweating in a gym. It's amazing how people think that health comes from a paid subscription to a gym. There's so muh more to do.

This is true.. but hard work-outs allow me to eat more calories and sculpt my body more efficiently.. low impact work-outs are nice but take longer to have an effect - and I have to restrict my calories much more to lose weight.
 

nysister

Well-Known Member
Wow that's crazy. Like someone said, I would not put my hair (style) in front of my health. Personally I have a treadmill at home, so I can be as sweaty as I like and I jump in the shower right after. Even when I had a relaxer and washed it once a week. I'd just do a hair rinse and that would be that. Health first. Hair second. Now I have a TWA and oh my word, life is so lovely and easy when it comes to this.
 

nysister

Well-Known Member
:look: Wait a cotton pickin' nano-second, isn't L’Oréal that racist organization that hates anything other than white? ummmm, even though it's true Black women do have their hair issues, I'll be taking this study with a grain of salt, a peppermint stick and a dill pickle. :sekret:

http://www.longhaircareforum.com/showthread.php?t=377101

That is true, and I noticed that also, but I think if we step back and take a look at it, there is a valid point being made here. I know people that have said as much to me. :ohwell:
 

beans4reezy

Well-Known Member
I used to be relunctant to workout and run because of my hair. But I got the point where I was tired of having my hair dictate what I do- especially since White women do not feel the need to schedule anything around their hair. I worked out, took a sa shower, wet my hair and wow, I was still able to put in a ponytail and still looked cute- WOW! And now, after finding LHCF and cowashes...Guess what? I can wash my hair after every workout without even thinking twice.
 

brucebettye

New Member
For me personally, until I was ready to actually take good care of my hair and not depend on weaves and braids did I want to try new ideas about hair care. I am happy that I was able to change becasue I am working out 5 days a week now and I want to be slim again and not over weight. So LHCF has help me to take care of my hair and also be able to work out 5 days a week. I am so looking forward to losing about 40lbs before this year is up.
 
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