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Damaged Hair Treatment Instructions

bellydancer

New Member
I'm going to save this for later use. My hair isn't damaged now (i hope it never will be) but this definitely would nurse it bac to health if it ever was.
 

Chimma

New Member
If you have hair past shoulder length that looks healthy and is well moisturized with products, but that breaks on a daily basis - which level are you on? A level 3?
 
G

Guest

Guest
Does anyone know why the Porosity Control is necessary? I mean if you do everything else is it really needed? The product info. states that it "helps create more uniform
color, perm and relaxer results." So if you don't have hair color, a perm, or a relaxer then what would be the point of using it?
 

caress

Active Member
[ QUOTE ]
Natori24 said:
Does anyone know why the Porosity Control is necessary? I mean if you do everything else is it really needed? The product info. states that it "helps create more uniform
color, perm and relaxer results." So if you don't have hair color, a perm, or a relaxer then what would be the point of using it?

[/ QUOTE ]

Well it supposed to smooth tha hair cuticle. When i use it my hair is very soft and extremely smooth. It works best after I've clarified my hair.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Did anyone else get good results with the Porosity Control? I don't think its for natural hair because it says it makes your relaxed, permed, or colored hair achieve great results-I got this from the product info. Like I asked before, is it really necessary? How can you tell if your hair is porous?
 

caress

Active Member
I don't think your hair has to be relaxed, permed, or colored to be porous. So if your hair is porous it is for you. Here is some info I found on the web:

http://www.haircoloradvisor.com/faq/glossary.html
Porous: The ability of hair to absorb color and moisture. Porous hair absorbs color faster and drabber. Rejects warm tones and absorbs like a sponge. Overly porous hair tangles easily and has lack of shine.


http://www.clairol.co.uk/Inside_Scoop211.jsp
Porosity and Healthy Hair

The porosity of your hair helps you decide what haircare and styling products are best for you. If hair is too porous, it will absorb too much liquid, which often indicates damage to the hair cuticle, cortex, or both. Choose haircare products that correct over-porous hair, such as Herbal Essences and Daily Defense Conditioner.


http://www.infusium.com/hair101/anatomy.asp
Porosity:
· Ability of hair to absorb moisture.
Seven Reasons for Over-Porous Hair:
1 Permanent wave
2 Relaxer/Straightener
3 Extremely damaged hair (improper/over styling)
4 Very long hair
5 Color-treated hair (excessive or misuse of haircoloring products)
6 Over-processed hair (over-lightened or frosted)
7 Over exposure to sun, water (chlorine)


http://www.substance.com/hn/haircare/article/0,,217360,00.html

In addition, some hair is more porous and will quickly soak up whatever you put on it, as well as the humidity in the air. If your hair gets frizzy on muggy days and flat on very dry ones, it's probably porous. Coarse hair is often porous, as is any hair that has been permed, straightened, permanently colored or otherwise damaged.


http://www.verticalsinhair.com/test.shtml
Porosity Test
Test the porosity of your hair. In order to test accurately for porosity, use three different areas: front hairline, in front of ears, and near the crown. Grasp small strands of dry hair and comb smoothly. Hold the ends firmly with the thumb and index finger of one hand and slide the fingers of the other hand from the ends towards the scalp. If the fingers do not slide easily, or if the hair ruffles up as your fingers slide down the stand, the hair is porous.
The more ruffles formed, the more porous is the hair. The less ruffles formed, the less porous is the hair. If the fingers slide easily and no ruffles are formed, the cuticle layer lays close to the hair shaft. This type of hair is least porous, is most resistant and will require a longer processing time.


http://hair.lifetips.com/TipSC.asp__Q__id__E__6009
Porosity of hair is the ability of the hair to absorb liquid or moisture. It is important when doing any sort of chemical treatment that the hair is not overly porous as it can soak up the chemicals too quickly and damage the hair. Also, if the hair does not have the same porosity over the entire head, some areas will process too fast. An easy test for porosity is to take a lock of hair and let it float on water for two minutes. If it floats, the outer layer is healthy. If it sinks, the outer layer is too open and will allow chemicals to absorb too quickly. Don´t process with any chemicals until treated with the proper reconstructors.


http://www.pg.com/science/haircare/hair_twh_34.htm
Porosity

In a normal, undamaged hair shaft, very little water can get either into or out of the cortex. This is because the cuticle covering the cortex is intact, and is then almost (but not quite) waterproof. Shampoos do not damage the cuticle. When hair is permed or tinted, however, the chemicals have to penetrate the cortex in order to react with the keratin inside it. Increasing the temperature, or applying an alkaline lotion, separates the scales of the cuticle enough to allow the chemicals to pass through. After the processing is finished the scales gradually close up again.

But if hair is processed too many times the cuticle scales may never return to their original tightness and the protection they once offered is lost. The cuticle can also be damaged in the same way by too much blow drying, curling irons that are too hot, and the effects of wind and sun. The hair becomes increasingly porous, and water can then pass in and out of the cortex.

Over-porous hair is dry, and tends to develop split ends. The damaged cuticle is fragile, and the damage worsens as time goes by. The greater the damage, the more the cortex swells with water whenever the hair is washed, but the more water it loses when it dries. The repeated wetting and drying of the cortex gradually weakens the hair.
 

Crystena77

New Member
Wow, thanks for the info.
 

Spagirl

New Member
Thanks for sharing that additional info Caress.


This thread has gotten me to thinking a bit deeper in my hair care needs.
 

Nyambura

surfer girl
Thanks, Caress. I remember Andre Walker writing that healthy hair doesn't relax quickly, so he can tell at a glance which hair will process fast (he considers this a sign of damaged hair) and which hair will 'fight' him (a good thing).

...
Maybe that's why my hair didn't relax so easily during my last touchup! Hmmmm.... I hope it's a sign that my hair is healthier.
 

cherish

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Nyambura said:
I remember Andre Walker writing that healthy hair doesn't relax quickly, so he can tell at a glance which hair will process fast (he considers this a sign of damaged hair) and which hair will 'fight' him (a good thing).


[/ QUOTE ]

I haven't read Andre's book, but this quote reminded me of a lot of the misinformation stylists would try to shove down my throat when I used to relax/texturize


Andre NEEDS to realize that the hair that tends to "fight" him probably has thick/wiry/coarse strands with strong bonds, while the ones that don't are probably fine or medium in texture (regardless of whether he's referring to virgin relaxing or touchups, but assuming most of his clients are in the latter category).

For touchups, the unhealthy heads may be due to lack of proper care, but more than likely it's from previous applications of too strong chems (and for too long) for that head. In either case, it really has little bearing on the newgrowth that is growing in from the scalp so that's just crazy talk. It's possible the hair is growing in from the scalp unhealthy, if the person has an extremely poor diet or anorexia or other medical condition, but these would be very rare cases.

I really feel this is yet another excuse stylists will try to use in order to pass the blame for bad results onto their clients


Again, I haven't read his book (don't plan to either), so I may have misunderstood that quote out of its context.
 

MizAvalon

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Nyambura said:
Thanks, Caress. I remember Andre Walker writing that healthy hair doesn't relax quickly, so he can tell at a glance which hair will process fast (he considers this a sign of damaged hair) and which hair will 'fight' him (a good thing).



I don't understand this. How can virgin hair be damaged? Isn't all hair healthy until it's had something done to it? Perhaps he's talking about pressing or coloring making it unhealthy? Otherwise how can new growth be anything but healthy?
Unless of course, you have health issues.
 

CharUK

"Honestly, Truly"
Wow!! Just what I need, and you know what? I have both the porosity shampoo and conditioner in my bathroom, but I haven't' used it in about 9 months!!

I'm looking forward to trying this.
 

Leslie_C

Well-Known Member
Ive also been wondering if anyone has tried this with success(????)

it seems like its A LOT of protein(using aphoghee PLUS nexxus and continuing the nexxus for several uses) I also dont understand if it means u do this for 9 days in a row or for 9 weeks in a row(It lists Day 1, then day 2,3,4,etc). My hair didnt seem to like me doing protein 2 weeks apart, I could only imagine weekly or daily! I do have most of the products(still not aphoghee or PM but I could get them easily)....
 

caress

Active Member
[ QUOTE ]
MizAvalon said:
[ QUOTE ]
Nyambura said:
Thanks, Caress. I remember Andre Walker writing that healthy hair doesn't relax quickly, so he can tell at a glance which hair will process fast (he considers this a sign of damaged hair) and which hair will 'fight' him (a good thing).



[/ QUOTE ]
I don't understand this. How can virgin hair be damaged? Isn't all hair healthy until it's had something done to it? Perhaps he's talking about pressing or coloring making it unhealthy? Otherwise how can new growth be anything but healthy?
Unless of course, you have health issues.

[/ QUOTE ]

Hair can be damaged by things other than chemicals and pressing the hair. Here is some info from the web that I thought might be of interest to you:

Which influences affect the hair and what is the result

Damaged hair can have less elasticity than normal hair, on the surface (cuticle) as well as in the fibre stem (cortex). It is rough and straw-like to the touch and is brittle, difficult to comb and tends to split at the ends. The cause can be divided into two groups:

Mechanical damage to the hair shaft

Low-quality combs, brushes, scissors and hair accessories can cause mechanical damage to the hair. The protective cuticle layer becomes increasingly rough and is broken down. The result is often split ends.

If the hair is wet, swollen and soft, combing poses a risk of over-stretching.

Rubbing of the hair during towel-drying is an added burden to the cuticle layer and can lead to over-stretching.

Thermal burdens such as hot blow-drying can lead to rapid evaporation of water and to extreme physical stress on the structure of the hair. Rapid drying makes the hair brittle, unruly and lacking in elasticity.

Chemical damage to the structure of the hair

Damage due to unprofessional colour treatments, bleaches or perms: Such treatments always interfere with the fine chemical structure of the hair. The fibrils of the hair, the interfibrillar substance and the melanin are made up of protein and therefore cannot be influenced selectively. If, for example, an incorrect strength of perm lotion (too strong) is applied in relation to the hair structure or the development time is too long at too high a temperature, the hair swells too much and can be damaged irreversibly.


Damage by UV rays: The damaging effect of sunlight on hair is often underestimated. It leads to a gradual process of oxidation. Especially on wet hair, the high-energy UV rays cause the intensive breakdown of melanin and keratin. The lightening of the pigments due to sunlight causes more structural damage than an equally-strong lightening effect with a high-quality, gentle bleaching agent. Negative changes to the hair structure are particularly accelerated if the hair is dried out more than usual, either by very salty seawater, strongly-chlorinated swimming pool water or climatic influences such as very dry air and wind.
http://www.wella-training-online.com/reference/tronl_en_03_download_5006_0_ml.pdf
Take this info with a grain of salt since this is from Wella's website and Wella sells their own hair care products.

WHAT CAUSES HAIR DAMAGE? Hair damage can be
caused by any of the following:

* Not moisturizing and conditioning regularly.
* Not having your split ends trimmed before they run up each hair shaft.
* Improper application of chemicals, such as over processing.
* Overlapping chemicals when you touch up a color or a perm.
* Using too much heat from a blow dryer, pressing comb or curling iron.
* Sleeping in tight rollers.
* Pulling braids too tightly from the scalp.
* Wearing rubber bands in your hair.
* Not protecting hair from the sun.
* Some medications. Illnesses.
http://www.care-gear.com/care/hair_damage.html

According to http://www.cwacts.com/events/GlobalBeauty/pdf/ColleenRocafort.pdf : Damaged hair is caused by Rubbing hair while lathering, Towel Drying, Blow Drying, Wet Combing, Brushing, Sunlight, Air Pollutants, Wind, Sea Water, Chlorine in swimming pools, Hair Styling, Curling, Braiding, Tying, Clamping, Combing and rubbing tip to root, Teasing, Stretching or extending, and Chemicals

And according to ivillage.com:
Causes of Hair Damage\
# Chemicals: Bleach, permanent and semipermanent colors, perms and straighteners all work by swelling the cuticle to get underneath it. This leaves the scales roughed up and prone to chipping or coming off altogether. Bleaching , perming and straightening also break down some of the protein bonds in the hair, weakening its structure.

# Physical wear: Friction is responsible for more damage than most people realize. A rough brush or comb (or even a good brush or comb used too much), salt left on the hair after swimming or working out and even pillowcases cause friction. Other physical damage can result from abrasion from rubber bands, barrettes and other accessories. Just-washed hair is especially susceptible to mechanical damage -- when wet, hair loses its ability to stretch and bounce back.

# Heat: Too-hot blow dryers, hot rollers, and curling and straightening implements all can crack cuticles and evaporate water in hair. However, adequate conditioning can insulate hair against low and medium heat.

# Weather: Ultraviolet rays break down some of the protein bonds in hair. A little sun won't have too much of an effect on healthy hair (particularly if it's dark), but it can be pretty tough on chemically processed hair. And wind can rough up cuticles.
 

Miss_Jetsetter

Well-Known Member
Hey ya'll this really works. I saw this post a while back and follwed the intructions to a "T" for exactly 3 months. My hair is in waaaaaay better condition than it has ever been!
 

pookeylou

New Member
Good info on what causes damage!

I personally dont believe that most damage can be undone. But the comments in that portion of the thread are certainly motivating to me to make sure I take percautions to prevent as much damage as I possibly can.

I am so glad I started using shea butter which has a natural UV protectant. I was worried that the sun coming through my sun roof would certainly fry my hair without it.
 
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