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Gaza Under Attack

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
Gaza isn't under attack. Hamas is under attack. This is what Hamas does when attacked:

And then they tell everybody who will listen "the Jews killed our kids".

Unlike members of neighboring continents I'm not going to say outsiders can't or shouldn't have an opinion on the subject. I will just remind people that even with the enormity of the claims of racism aimed at Israel, there's a reason that black people run to that little sliver of land as opposed to the rest of the middle east including Palestinian territories and it's called slavery and/ or human trafficking that still happens today so it might be helpful to know who you putting a cape on for.
 

Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
Gaza isn't under attack. Hamas is under attack. This is what Hamas does when attacked:

And then they tell everybody who will listen "the Jews killed our kids".

Unlike members of neighboring continents I'm not going to say outsiders can't or shouldn't have an opinion on the subject. I will just remind people that even with the enormity of the claims of racism aimed at Israel, there's a reason that black people run to that little sliver of land as opposed to the rest of the middle east including Palestinian territories and it's called slavery and/ or human trafficking that still happens today so it might be helpful to know who you putting a cape on for.

'The media will have you hating those who are oppressed and loving those doing the oppressing.' - Malcolm X

What I find most interesting is that you blame Hamas for inciting violence when it is the same Israeli forces and Zionists who have time and again instigated, harassed and slaughtered innocent Palestinians for the simple fact that they want to exterminate Palestinians from land that belongs to Palestine.

This entire ordeal was triggered because those same Israeli forces decided to storm a mosque, and when the Palestinians and Hamas retaliated, suddenly, it is their fault.

The only reason Israel remains standing is because of the United States. But with each cause, there will be an effect. This too shall end.


#FreePalestine.
 
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Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
#FreePalestine.
There is no Palestine to free the same way there is no whatever America was called before it was America.

'The media will have you hating those who are oppressed and loving those doing the oppressing.' - Malcolm X

What I find most interesting is that you blame Hamas for inciting violence when it is the same Israeli forces and Zionists who have time and again instigated, harassed and slaughtered innocent Palestinians for the simple fact that they want to exterminate Palestinians from land that belongs to Palestine.

This entire ordeal was triggered because those same Israeli forces decided to storm a mosque, and when the Palestinians and Hamas retaliated, suddenly, it is their fault.

The only reason Israel remains standing is because of the United States. But with each cause, there will be an effect. This too shall end.


#FreePalestine.
I blame Hamas and all the other Palestinian resistance groups that have popped up over the last 70+ years for letting Egypt and the middle east pimp them like the pawns they are. If Israel wanted to exterminate the Palestinians it would have been done already with plausible deniability.

No, the entire ordeal wasn't triggered by one thing that happened last week, there is nonstop action and reaction. When I lived in Tel Aviv during so called "peaceful" times rockets from Gaza flew over the city and were intercepted in the sky by the Israeli military multiple times a week. I'm telling you what I saw, not what I heard off somebody's media. The only time Gaza can pull off attacks like what is currently going on is a fresh infusion of cash funding from the surrounding Arab countries who sold them out in the first place. And let's be clear, in the unlikely event that Israel ever fell, it would not go back to the Palestinians.
 

ScorpioBeauty09

Well-Known Member
Yeah he quickly deleted an IG post about it. They went in on him yesterday.
He was supposed to attend an event celebrating Eid and they told him not to come. I never cared much for him but I'm done.

I'm taking notes on all the reps in the House who recently signed a letter insisting aid to Israel be unconditional. Thankfully my rep is not among them but the silence of the US congress to the Palestinians' suffering is deplorable.
 
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Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
There is no Palestine to free the same way there is no whatever America was called before it was America.


I blame Hamas and all the other Palestinian resistance groups that have popped up over the last 70+ years for letting Egypt and the middle east pimp them like the pawns they are. If Israel wanted to exterminate the Palestinians it would have been done already with plausible deniability.

No, the entire ordeal wasn't triggered by one thing that happened last week, there is nonstop action and reaction. When I lived in Tel Aviv during so called "peaceful" times rockets from Gaza flew over the city and were intercepted in the sky by the Israeli military multiple times a week. I'm telling you what I saw, not what I heard off somebody's media. The only time Gaza can pull off attacks like what is currently going on is a fresh infusion of cash funding from the surrounding Arab countries who sold them out in the first place. And let's be clear, in the unlikely event that Israel ever fell, it would not go back to the Palestinians.

So blame Hamas because they are trying to defend what is their land? That's like blaming a woman with a gun to her head for punching her rapist for trying to defend herself.

Hamas was founded out of sheer desperation to try and save what is being stolen from them. You could have lived there - it does NOT change the fact that Israel has and continues to exterminate Palestinians with the establishment of their "country" on the land of another.

As for your OPINION on Israel ever returning to the Palestinians, please continue pontificating. Man will never be greater than God and his plan, and best believe Israel will reap what it has sown against all Palestinians.

Everyone should research the Balfour Declaration. Israel is not a country because it has no sovereignty and the territory they have established themselves with the help of the UK is on disputed land.
 
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Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
A story worth sharing from someone who did more than "live in Tel Aviv" but whose family experienced what occurred firsthand against Palestine and its people. This is the type of TRUTH that must be shared:

These are my grandparents, Joseph, Charlotte, George, Nuha. All born in Palestine between 1922 and 1935. Their parents and the generations before them were also born in Palestine. In 1948, they along with 700,000 other Christian and Muslim Palestinians were expelled by Zionist militias (most were recent arrivals from Europe) in a deliberate act of ethnic cleansing (Recommend Read: The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine by Israeli historian Ilan Pappe). Those that stayed behind suffered a different fate; being second class citizens in their own country.

My grandparents and none of the 700,000 Palestinians or their descendants were ever allowed to return. They had their homes, land, and country stolen from them. They were also never compensated. My maternal grandfather, George, called it 'The biggest robbery in human history'.

Since 1948, Israel has continued to ethnically cleanse Palestine through apartheid policies, home confiscation, settlement expansion, discriminatory laws that favor Jews over Arabs, and outright brutality… And While Israel denies Palestinians living within its border basic human rights and denies the Palestinian diaspora that they expelled from ever returning, it allows and encourages Jews from anywhere in the world, even if they have no ties to the land, to go and live the land of my grandparents.

A state that favors one race/religion over another is a racist state. Israel according to the latest report from Human Rights Watch, and countless previous human rights reports is an apartheid state.

Stop the ethnic cleansing, stop the oppression and destruction of Gaza and stop the theft of more Palestinian homes.


184748702_10106366130136460_5216707497731959825_n.jpg


182922410_10106366130121490_4704903331110676217_n.jpg

SOURCE
 

Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
He was supposed to attend an event celebrating Eid and they told him not to come. I never cared much for him but I'm done.

I'm taking notes on all the reps in the House who recently signed a letter insisting aid to Israel be unconditional. Thankfully my rep is not among them but the silence of the US congress to the Palestinians' suffering is deplorable.

I attended Eid celebrations and this entire attack dampened my and many spirits. Palestinians cannot even congregate in peace in their own mosques and homes without Israelis attacking them. Its truly disgusting our tax dollars are supporting this mess while the world just watches and does nothing. Same with the Rohingya people in Myanmar.
 

Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
THIS!!!!! No one would be comfortable with their neighbor PERMANANTLEY encroaching upon thier "space". Hell, folks are known to fight for the little space allocated to them refered to as "Airplane Seats" and they don't even own that space!

The land grab has got to STOP.

Especially if a court order was issued to say that your neighbor is only to stay at your home temporarily, but because the town council decided to side with the neighbor, suddenly, your home is now their home and you only get to live in the bathroom.

The fact that Black women on this forum that experienced and understand racism and oppression in this country is defending this mess is simply astounding.
 

ScorpioBeauty09

Well-Known Member
I attended Eid celebrations and this entire attack dampened my and many spirits. Palestinians cannot even congregate in peace in their own mosques and homes without Israelis attacking them. Its truly disgusting our tax dollars are supporting this mess while the world just watches and does nothing. Same with the Rohingya people in Myanmar.
My mom doesn’t do Ramadan anymore because of her diabetes but this has been weighing on her mind. Mine too. My heart breaks for people who’ve lost their homes and their children. The Rohingya and the Uighrs, it’s heartbreaking and infuriating.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
As for your OPINION on Israel ever returning to the Palestinians, please continue pontificating.
Oh I will.

But right now I feel like pontificating about something else.

I'm a black woman, specifically AA. I am also a Jew. I grew up oppressed and financially exploited by the largest middle eastern population in the United States. I have never once in my black Jewish :moon: life caped for Jews an IOTA as much as the average black person I have encountered outside of Detroit capes for Palestinians. Seems like the only black folks who feel such affinity with Palestinians as some kind of light skinned cousins are the ones who haven't had to live with them. The tone of black people directed toward other black people over non black people is fascinating.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jews as a collective are going to be fine. Palestinians are :censored: regardless of whatever way the conflict goes that's how they ended up occupied by the Ottoman Empire, occupied by Egypt, occupied by Britain and France and rebranded as Israel in the first place. Ya'll light skinned cousins haven't been able to hold or defend that land for over 1000 years and nothing is going to change one way or the other.
 
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Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
A story worth sharing from someone who did more than "live in Tel Aviv" but whose family experienced what occurred firsthand against Palestine and its people. This is the type of TRUTH that must be shared:



View attachment 472109

SOURCE
What about these Palestinians who couldn't live in your family's neighborhood? Does their truth not count? I'm trying to see something. Since I managed to interact with people darker than a paper bag when I was merely living in Tel Aviv.

THE AFRICANS OF JERUSALEM: ALIENATION AND COUNTER-ALIENATION​

Opening of the community centre; Yasser Qous in the middle, dressed in turquoise, Jerusalem 1996.

Opening of the community centre; Yasser Qous in the middle, dressed in turquoise, Jerusalem 1996. | ©Privat
I was born in the mid-seventies in Jerusalem to a family of seven; I was the eighth. My father, an African, came from the city of Masina in Chad and my mother was a Palestinian "white" mother from Jericho in the Jordan Valley. I grew up as the mulatto ("muwallad") kid in the African neighbourhood. This is how the first generation of African immigrants to Jerusalem were known. We are the children born of mixed African-Palestinian marriages.
By Yasser Qous
Evil must be confronted by the power of good and love. When love destroys evil, it kills it forever. Brute force can only bury evil temporarily, however, because evil is a stubborn seed. As soon as it is buried, it grows again in secret, and when it reappears, it is even more ugly.
Tierno Bokar, "the Fulani sage of Bandiagara", giving advice to his student Amadou Hampate Ba



A guardian at Augusta Victoria Hospital 1928, Palestine
A guardian at Augusta Victoria Hospital 1928, Palestine | ©Library of CongressAfrican Jerusalemites, or the "Takarneh", as the Palestinian historian Aref al-Aref (1892-1973) described them in his comprehensive book on the history of Jerusalem (1961), are "one of Jerusalemʹs major families. They came there from Darfur and its environs. It is said that they are originally from Tikrit and that they belong to the Zawba branch of the Shammar tribe. The government used to employ them in the police force and they were entrusted with guarding the schools, which were held in the houses, homes and cloisters around the Haram al-Sharif. They are black, tall, and well-built."

In a pamphlet entitled "Muslim Africans in Jerusalem", which was published by the Islamic Endowments Department in Jerusalem (1984), the Palestinian researcher of African roots, Husni Shaheen, noted that they are Muslims from a number of African countries, including Nigeria, Chad, French Sudan (which is now Mali) and Senegal. They are also descended from various African Arab tribes, including the Hausa, Salamat, Barqou, Zaghawa, Borno, Kanembu and Bulala.

In this essay, I will endeavour to illuminate and make sense of the status of black Africans. I will look at the impact of skin colour, what that means in terms of profession and place of abode, and how this is all related to alienation. I will also look at the measures African Jerusalemites adopt to counter this estrangement.

The community centre, Jerusalem 2013.
The community centre, Jerusalem 2013. | ©PrivatLet us look first at the meaning of the word "black" in al-Maʹany dictionary. It refers, on the one hand, to skin colour and, on the other, to the place from which "black Africans" come. The second definition clashes to some extent with that advanced by Aref al-Aref, which contends that they are from "Darfur and the surrounding area" i.e. from a specific geographical area with particular cultural and religious characteristics. This leads us into a discussion about the impact and relationship of that geographical-cultural classification with the distinction which has developed in Palestinian eyes between the free black African and the kidnapped "slave". We will also look at the impact and scale of this vis a vis the "Takruri" (singular form of Takarneh) African, based on the distinction between cultural status and that of the African "other".

MEASURES OF SOCIAL STATUS FOR BLACK AFRICANS​

Some may not even know that there are black Africans living in communities in various cities and refugee camps inside Palestine. Many researchers and historians e.g. Huda Lutfi, Aref al-Aref and Ali Qleibo, believe that the African connection with Palestine dates back to the Mamluk and Ottoman periods.

The Entrance of the Prison with Turkish soldiers, photo between 1889 - 1914, Palestine
The Entrance of the Prison with Turkish soldiers, photo between 1889 - 1914, Palestine | ©Library of CongressIn Lutfiʹs study of the records and documents of the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem during the Mamluk period, she distinguishes between the status of the black "Takruri" African within the Islamic Ummah and the non-Muslim black African who was, to all intents and purposes, a "slave". Meanwhile, Aref al-Aref and Ali Qleibo both agree that the "Takruri" Africans were used as guards and to serve in the holy places in Jerusalem and Mecca during the Mamluk and Ottoman eras. And letʹs stop here at the notion of "service", since it is misleading. Qlaqshandi notes that it is a title which was bestowed by the Sultan. In "Lisan al-ʹArab", and subject to the specific role and task involved, it refers to "anyone who serves someone else, be they male or female, a young male or female slave." This begs the question: to what extent did this distinction among black Africans re-shape the cultural identity of the "Takruri" African?

THE PROBLEMATIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SKIN COLOUR, PROFESSION AND PLACE OF ABODE​


Yasser Qous
Yasser Qous | ©PrivatIn an attempt to connect skin colour with the African heritage and the impact of this on the cultural identity of African Jerusalemites, I recall from memory the words that my uncle Hajj Jibril Ould Shine, rest his soul, used to recite to me, "Weʹre not slaves, weʹre free." My uncleʹs words were a barometer to measure the extent to which the concept of cultural separation had come into being, thus creating an identity that was estranged from its African forebear. It emphasised the genealogical links with the Arabian Peninsula. "Weʹre originally from Jeddah," as the Mukhtar Mohammed Jiddah suggests in an interview with him in 1997.

If we look at the connection between profession, skin colour and physical traits, "being black, tall and well-built," as al-Aref puts it in his book, was the reason why African Jerusalemites were chosen for security jobs. Herein is another indicator that allows us to gauge the relationship and role of these three key elements in determining the social status of black Africans. They adhere closely to the stereotype i.e. work that requires physical effort, not mental.

The last link is the place of abode. In the case of Jerusalem, most Africans live in the African Quarter. It consists of two historical buildings, "Ribat al-Mansouri" and "Ribat al-Basiri", both of which were built during the Mamluk era in the 12th century near the Inspectorʹs Gate, which leads to the Haram al-Sharif. At the end of the Ottoman era, specifically between 1898 and 1914, the two ribats were used as prisons by the Ottoman authorities. Ribat al-Basiri was reserved for Arab prisoners on death row and was known as the "jail of blood", whilst Ribat al-Mansouri, the "ribat jail", was reserved for Arab prisoners given custodial sentences. After 1929, both ribats were used as homes for the African Jerusalemites. Since then, some local people began to call them "the slavesʹ prison", a name linked both to the buildingsʹ historical function and to skin colour, since the blacks were the slaves.

Some Jerusalemites try to soften the racist overtones of this labelling, with an over-idealistic view of Palestinian society: "weʹre all one, weʹre all brothers and weʹre all equals". Their use of this designation merely reflects their ignorance, and it doesnʹt imply any cultural or social racism towards black Africans. Indeed, in their scenario, racism does not exist in Palestinian society as we are all "Godʹs slaves" in a religious sense.
Yasser Qous (left) and Faisal al-Husseini, former PLO representative in Jerusalem, at the opening of the community centre, Jerusalem 1996.
Yasser Qous (left) and Faisal al-Husseini, former PLO representative in Jerusalem, at the opening of the community centre, Jerusalem 1996. | ©PrivatI wonder if we are really like that and whether itʹs true. After all, how can a utopian view explain or justify the continued use of a term such as "the slaves of Duyuk" when talking about the black-skinned population in northern Jericho near Ein al-Duyuk? Similarly, how can we still use the "slavesʹ quarter" as a label for those neighbourhoods inhabited mostly by black people in certain cities, towns and refugee camps inside the Green Line and in the West Bank?

In conclusion, the problems of differing definitions and a stereotype based on skin colour, profession and place of abode, are the cornerstones for understanding the status of black Africans in Palestinian society. On the one hand, the term ʹblack Africanʹ has been subject to a process of appropriation and cultural exchange (as in the case of the African Takruri). On the other hand, it referred to a specific time in history (to the spread of Islam in Africa), as if al-Aref is saying that African people had no culture until the Islamisation and Arabisation of African society. Notwithstanding this, I have tried in the above examples to show how the barriers between Jerusalemites and the African Takruri declined because they were all part of the Muslim community. At the same time, discrimination is based on ethnic parameters: whether they are called Takruri or otherwise, the African remains the "black slave" in the Arab cultural psyche.

AUTHOR​

Yasser Qous is a master’s student at the Department of History and Civilization of the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. His research interests revolve around the social history of Palestine, with a focus on the historical development of the Afro-Palestinian community in Jerusalem.
 

Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
What about these Palestinians who couldn't live in your family's neighborhood? Does their truth not count? I'm trying to see something. Since I managed to interact with people darker than a paper bag when I was merely living in Tel Aviv.

THE AFRICANS OF JERUSALEM: ALIENATION AND COUNTER-ALIENATION​

Opening of the community centre; Yasser Qous in the middle, dressed in turquoise, Jerusalem 1996.

Opening of the community centre; Yasser Qous in the middle, dressed in turquoise, Jerusalem 1996. | ©Privat
I was born in the mid-seventies in Jerusalem to a family of seven; I was the eighth. My father, an African, came from the city of Masina in Chad and my mother was a Palestinian "white" mother from Jericho in the Jordan Valley. I grew up as the mulatto ("muwallad") kid in the African neighbourhood. This is how the first generation of African immigrants to Jerusalem were known. We are the children born of mixed African-Palestinian marriages.
By Yasser Qous




A guardian at Augusta Victoria Hospital 1928, Palestine
A guardian at Augusta Victoria Hospital 1928, Palestine | ©Library of CongressAfrican Jerusalemites, or the "Takarneh", as the Palestinian historian Aref al-Aref (1892-1973) described them in his comprehensive book on the history of Jerusalem (1961), are "one of Jerusalemʹs major families. They came there from Darfur and its environs. It is said that they are originally from Tikrit and that they belong to the Zawba branch of the Shammar tribe. The government used to employ them in the police force and they were entrusted with guarding the schools, which were held in the houses, homes and cloisters around the Haram al-Sharif. They are black, tall, and well-built."

In a pamphlet entitled "Muslim Africans in Jerusalem", which was published by the Islamic Endowments Department in Jerusalem (1984), the Palestinian researcher of African roots, Husni Shaheen, noted that they are Muslims from a number of African countries, including Nigeria, Chad, French Sudan (which is now Mali) and Senegal. They are also descended from various African Arab tribes, including the Hausa, Salamat, Barqou, Zaghawa, Borno, Kanembu and Bulala.

In this essay, I will endeavour to illuminate and make sense of the status of black Africans. I will look at the impact of skin colour, what that means in terms of profession and place of abode, and how this is all related to alienation. I will also look at the measures African Jerusalemites adopt to counter this estrangement.

The community centre, Jerusalem 2013.
The community centre, Jerusalem 2013. | ©PrivatLet us look first at the meaning of the word "black" in al-Maʹany dictionary. It refers, on the one hand, to skin colour and, on the other, to the place from which "black Africans" come. The second definition clashes to some extent with that advanced by Aref al-Aref, which contends that they are from "Darfur and the surrounding area" i.e. from a specific geographical area with particular cultural and religious characteristics. This leads us into a discussion about the impact and relationship of that geographical-cultural classification with the distinction which has developed in Palestinian eyes between the free black African and the kidnapped "slave". We will also look at the impact and scale of this vis a vis the "Takruri" (singular form of Takarneh) African, based on the distinction between cultural status and that of the African "other".

MEASURES OF SOCIAL STATUS FOR BLACK AFRICANS​

Some may not even know that there are black Africans living in communities in various cities and refugee camps inside Palestine. Many researchers and historians e.g. Huda Lutfi, Aref al-Aref and Ali Qleibo, believe that the African connection with Palestine dates back to the Mamluk and Ottoman periods.

The Entrance of the Prison with Turkish soldiers, photo between 1889 - 1914, Palestine
The Entrance of the Prison with Turkish soldiers, photo between 1889 - 1914, Palestine | ©Library of CongressIn Lutfiʹs study of the records and documents of the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem during the Mamluk period, she distinguishes between the status of the black "Takruri" African within the Islamic Ummah and the non-Muslim black African who was, to all intents and purposes, a "slave". Meanwhile, Aref al-Aref and Ali Qleibo both agree that the "Takruri" Africans were used as guards and to serve in the holy places in Jerusalem and Mecca during the Mamluk and Ottoman eras. And letʹs stop here at the notion of "service", since it is misleading. Qlaqshandi notes that it is a title which was bestowed by the Sultan. In "Lisan al-ʹArab", and subject to the specific role and task involved, it refers to "anyone who serves someone else, be they male or female, a young male or female slave." This begs the question: to what extent did this distinction among black Africans re-shape the cultural identity of the "Takruri" African?

THE PROBLEMATIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SKIN COLOUR, PROFESSION AND PLACE OF ABODE​


Yasser Qous
Yasser Qous | ©PrivatIn an attempt to connect skin colour with the African heritage and the impact of this on the cultural identity of African Jerusalemites, I recall from memory the words that my uncle Hajj Jibril Ould Shine, rest his soul, used to recite to me, "Weʹre not slaves, weʹre free." My uncleʹs words were a barometer to measure the extent to which the concept of cultural separation had come into being, thus creating an identity that was estranged from its African forebear. It emphasised the genealogical links with the Arabian Peninsula. "Weʹre originally from Jeddah," as the Mukhtar Mohammed Jiddah suggests in an interview with him in 1997.

If we look at the connection between profession, skin colour and physical traits, "being black, tall and well-built," as al-Aref puts it in his book, was the reason why African Jerusalemites were chosen for security jobs. Herein is another indicator that allows us to gauge the relationship and role of these three key elements in determining the social status of black Africans. They adhere closely to the stereotype i.e. work that requires physical effort, not mental.

The last link is the place of abode. In the case of Jerusalem, most Africans live in the African Quarter. It consists of two historical buildings, "Ribat al-Mansouri" and "Ribat al-Basiri", both of which were built during the Mamluk era in the 12th century near the Inspectorʹs Gate, which leads to the Haram al-Sharif. At the end of the Ottoman era, specifically between 1898 and 1914, the two ribats were used as prisons by the Ottoman authorities. Ribat al-Basiri was reserved for Arab prisoners on death row and was known as the "jail of blood", whilst Ribat al-Mansouri, the "ribat jail", was reserved for Arab prisoners given custodial sentences. After 1929, both ribats were used as homes for the African Jerusalemites. Since then, some local people began to call them "the slavesʹ prison", a name linked both to the buildingsʹ historical function and to skin colour, since the blacks were the slaves.

Some Jerusalemites try to soften the racist overtones of this labelling, with an over-idealistic view of Palestinian society: "weʹre all one, weʹre all brothers and weʹre all equals". Their use of this designation merely reflects their ignorance, and it doesnʹt imply any cultural or social racism towards black Africans. Indeed, in their scenario, racism does not exist in Palestinian society as we are all "Godʹs slaves" in a religious sense.
Yasser Qous (left) and Faisal al-Husseini, former PLO representative in Jerusalem, at the opening of the community centre, Jerusalem 1996.
Yasser Qous (left) and Faisal al-Husseini, former PLO representative in Jerusalem, at the opening of the community centre, Jerusalem 1996. | ©PrivatI wonder if we are really like that and whether itʹs true. After all, how can a utopian view explain or justify the continued use of a term such as "the slaves of Duyuk" when talking about the black-skinned population in northern Jericho near Ein al-Duyuk? Similarly, how can we still use the "slavesʹ quarter" as a label for those neighbourhoods inhabited mostly by black people in certain cities, towns and refugee camps inside the Green Line and in the West Bank?

In conclusion, the problems of differing definitions and a stereotype based on skin colour, profession and place of abode, are the cornerstones for understanding the status of black Africans in Palestinian society. On the one hand, the term ʹblack Africanʹ has been subject to a process of appropriation and cultural exchange (as in the case of the African Takruri). On the other hand, it referred to a specific time in history (to the spread of Islam in Africa), as if al-Aref is saying that African people had no culture until the Islamisation and Arabisation of African society. Notwithstanding this, I have tried in the above examples to show how the barriers between Jerusalemites and the African Takruri declined because they were all part of the Muslim community. At the same time, discrimination is based on ethnic parameters: whether they are called Takruri or otherwise, the African remains the "black slave" in the Arab cultural psyche.

AUTHOR​

Yasser Qous is a master’s student at the Department of History and Civilization of the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. His research interests revolve around the social history of Palestine, with a focus on the historical development of the Afro-Palestinian community in Jerusalem.

Certainly a case of the pot calling the kettle black.

You cannot under any circumstances try and speak about the racism experienced by Black Africans at the behest of Palestinians without also discussing the plight and ostracism of Ethiopian Jews by your beloved Israel.

Seeing that you wish to drop long articles in this thread, I implore you to also read and educate yourself on the discrimination experienced by Black Jews seeing that you conveniently chose to skirt around it to only point out the experiences of Africans in Palestine:

_83124842_hi027175557.jpg

"Growing up in Israel, Shay Sium became accustomed to being called a “n*gger”.

Sium, 32, has lived in Israel most of his life, but says he and other Ethiopian Jews are treated differently from other Israelis: factories do not want to employ them; landlords refuse them; and certain schools turn away their children.

"The word discrimination doesn’t describe what we experience. There is another word for it: racism. It is a shame that we still have to use this word today,” he told IRIN.

An estimated 125,000 Ethiopian Jews live in Israel, but while they are supposed to be full citizens with equal rights, their community has continued to face widespread discrimination and socio-economic difficulties, according to its leaders."


 
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Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
My mom doesn’t do Ramadan anymore because of her diabetes but this has been weighing on her mind. Mine too. My heart breaks for people who’ve lost their homes and their children. The Rohingya and the Uighrs, it’s heartbreaking and infuriating.

I'm trying to see ways in which I can utilize my legal experience to try and volunteer time for asylum applications. I know you're also an attorney, right sis? I refuse to just sit back and see this happen against other HUMANS.
 

ScorpioBeauty09

Well-Known Member
I'm trying to see ways in which I can utilize my legal experience to try and volunteer time for asylum applications. I know you're also an attorney, right sis? I refuse to just sit back and see this happen against other HUMANS.
I have a JD but the bar in California is ridiculously hard to pass. Bar exam results recently came out and 37% passed. It's crazy. I would happily volunteer my time to research case law or something. Research was always where I shone best and what I love doing. Especially in a situation like this. I'm uncomfortable sitting and doing nothing.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
I’m embarrassed to admit this but when these discussions come up I’m never sure who’s right because there’s so much history and people tend to have strong biases.

What are good sources (preferably by uninvolved third parties) of info to educate myself? Nothing against the articles posted in this thread but I’m trying to understand the conflict in general terms before examining it in terms of Black people.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
You cannot under any circumstances try and speak about the racism experienced by Black Africans at the behest of Palestinians without also discussing the plight and ostracism of Ethiopian Jews by your beloved Israel.

Seeing that you wish to drop long articles in this thread, I implore you to also read and educate yourself on the discrimination experienced by Black Jews seeing that you conveniently chose to skirt around it to only point out the experiences of Africans in Palestine:
Who are you talking to?

I have discussed with other Black Jews on this board and non black Jews off the board about the treatment of Ethiopian Jews. Not to mention that I broke bread with Ethiopian Jews and Afro Palestinians (everybody always wants to feed me) when I was merely living in Tel Aviv. Yet again, the tone of black people to other black people when it comes to anything related to this topic is fascinating.

Receipts from eleven years ago below.

https://longhaircareforum.com/threads/racist-treatment-of-ethiopian-in-israel.433412/post-9814174
No, it's not supposed to go down this way amongst Jews but at the same time there is no haven for black people anywhere on this planet including Africa. I can guarantee you that given the choice between staying in Israel and taking the shot vs going back to Ethiopia- the shot will win 100% of the time.

Anywhere black people are in the world without control of their own resources, this will happen.

So what do we do to combat this? Self sufficiency and getting from underneath the thumb of majority rule is difficult but not impossible and it's been done before - hell see Jewish history for a blueprint.
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I think that the claim that the Ashkenaz are treating the Ethiopians the way the Nazi's did them is not fair or rational. What they are doing is definitely racist, no argument there. But there is an ocean sized chasm between giving people birth control and exterminating them.

The shots are not mandatory, but an unplanned pregnancy means 'you' will have to figure out a hustle to support any additional children. We on this board have had the same debate about how many children someone could expect the state to support in this country.
 
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