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I think my hair is breaking in the same area because of how I wear it

abioni

Well-Known Member
I was going to ask about how to prevent my hair from breaking in the same area due to dying my hair but it just occurred to me that it might be the way I wear it most of the time. I wear it in a ponytail at the top of my head. I think if it is caused by the dying of my hair, the breakage won't be in one area (I think? ).

My hair breaks around the APL area. I had to cut my hair two years ago because the middle of my hair in the back below shoulder length and around APL area broke off. I thought it was color (I was using Ion demi-permanent color) so I changed to Henna but it dries my hair. I decided to go back to colors, I currently use Clairol Natural Instincts, non-permanent color. (By the way, this dye rubs off around my hairline very fast so I would appreciate recommendations for a better dye)

My hair is beginning to look see-through in the same area. What ways can I wear my hair up and not get breakage?

Hair profile: I'm relaxed with grays in the front.

20210919_080347.jpg
 
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abioni

Well-Known Member
What area is it breaking in? What are you using to secure your pony?

Ive learned over the years to always vary the positioning of ponytails and other updos/protective styles. You don’t want to constantly stress the same area of your hair/scalp.


It's breaking at back. I use non-metal having ponytail holders. I just ordered satin ponytail holders.

Regarding switching positions, I'm learning to do that now. Today, I have it in two ponytails and I have switched the position twice today.
 

Theresamonet

Well-Known Member
It's breaking at back. I use non-metal having ponytail holders. I just ordered satin ponytail holders.

Regarding switching positions, I'm learning to do that now. Today, I have it in two ponytails and I have switched the position twice today.

Ok, when you say the back, are you referring to the nape area? If so, a good tip to cut tension at the nape (and front edges) is to not gather that area into the ponytail at all. Leave that area out until you have your ponytail secure. Then brush the nape hair up and just wrap that hair around the base of the ponytail.

I was going to suggest satin ponytail holders, so I’m happy you ordered some. I find that most elastic bands put too much tension on the hair. Even those without the metal. Anything that shows a demarcation line when I remove it, I don’t use. I prefer my Flexi 8 clips, hairzings, and banana clips to make up dos over elastic bands. They’re usually less tension and more stylish, imo.
 

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
I think everyone has given great suggestions. The only other thing I would add @abioni is to consider your "Break Point". This is a phrase I made up that I use to describe the point at which our afro-textured hair grows 'normally' right before it starts to break. I think APL is your "Break Point" length. That means that you may need to do something different to retain health and length at APL and beyond. For example, for me, I can retain length at around bra-strap with normal styles like a loose ponytail. But, if I want my hair to grow beyond that length, I have to wear different styles. Bra- Strap is my break point length. Once I learned what my hair needed to get past bra-strap length, I learned that my next 'Break Point' was around waist length. Thus, I had to re-adjust my processes to continue to gain length from that point. Now, I have scraggly hairs that hang past my tailbone. To continue to gain and retain length at this point I have to change my conditioner to ensure I put little or NO tension on that hair when I handle it. I changed over to a KeraCare product. It gives my hair a tremendous amount of slip.

I really do believe that the same head of hair can have very different needs at different lengths. The hard part is knowing those needs and how to satisfy them enough so that the hair continues to thrive.
 

LushLox

Well-Known Member
I had a bad W issue some years ago caused by wearing ponies in the back middle section of my nape. To try and rectify this I stopped using pony holders for a long period. However, I still wanted to bun so I would simply use hair pins and I would place the buns in different sections of my hair. Essentially there would be no pressure on my edges or my nape at all. It did not make for a pleasant aesthetic no, but it sure did solve that problem. Within 6-12 months my nape went completely back to normal. Wear your bun a bit lower and position it in different areas.

To this day I rarely wear pony tail at my centre nape. I will normally wear them on the side, quite loose, and I only use 100% silk for my scrunchies.
 
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abioni

Well-Known Member
Ok, when you say the back, are you referring to the nape area? If so, a good tip to cut tension at the nape (and front edges) is to not gather that area into the ponytail at all. Leave that area out until you have your ponytail secure. Then brush the nape hair up and just wrap that hair around the base of the ponytail.

I was going to suggest satin ponytail holders, so I’m happy you ordered some. I find that most elastic bands put too much tension on the hair. Even those without the metal. Anything that shows a demarcation line when I remove it, I don’t use. I prefer my Flexi 8 clips, hairzings, and banana clips to make up dos over elastic bands. They’re usually less tension and more stylish, imo.

Thank you for the hair holder ideas. I will look into them. I have attached a pic to show my breakage from two years ago.
 

abioni

Well-Known Member
I think everyone has given great suggestions. The only other thing I would add @abioni is to consider your "Break Point". This is a phrase I made up that I use to describe the point at which our afro-textured hair grows 'normally' right before it starts to break. I think APL is your "Break Point" length. That means that you may need to do something different to retain health and length at APL and beyond. For example, for me, I can retain length at around bra-strap with normal styles like a loose ponytail. But, if I want my hair to grow beyond that length, I have to wear different styles. Bra- Strap is my break point length. Once I learned what my hair needed to get past bra-strap length, I learned that my next 'Break Point' was around waist length. Thus, I had to re-adjust my processes to continue to gain length from that point. Now, I have scraggly hairs that hang past my tailbone. To continue to gain and retain length at this point I have to change my conditioner to ensure I put little or NO tension on that hair when I handle it. I changed over to a KeraCare product. It gives my hair a tremendous amount of slip.

I really do believe that the same head of hair can have very different needs at different lengths. The hard part is knowing those needs and how to satisfy them enough so that the hair continues to thrive.

I have never heard of the break point. That's very interesting. Thank you! Not sure if I'm having a break point issue, I attached a pic to show the breakage from two years ago. It was in the middle from neck down. But it did start breaking when I reached APL.
 

abioni

Well-Known Member
I had a bad W issue some years caused by wearing ponies in the back middle section of my nape. To try and rectify this I stopped using pony holders for a long period. However, I still wanted to bun so I would simply use hair pins and I would place the buns in different sections of my hair. Essentially there would be no pressure on my edges or my nape at all. It did not make for a pleasant aesthetic no, but it sure did solve that problem. Within 6-12 months my nape went completely back to normal. Wear your bun a bit lower and position it in different areas.

To this day I rarely wear pony tail at my centre nape. I will normally wear them on the side, quite loose, and I only use 100% silk for my scrunchies.


I used hair pins the night I made this post. I took them off the next day because I thought they will break my hair. Also they were uncomfortable to sleep in. They kept poking my scalp. Now that I know that they won't break my hair, I will try them again. Thanks for the tips.
 

LushLox

Well-Known Member
I used hair pins the night I made this post. I took them off the next day because I thought they will break my hair. Also they were uncomfortable to sleep in. They kept poking my scalp. Now that I know that they won't break my hair, I will try them again. Thanks for the tips.

Just looking at your pics, yeah the W issue is common OP, many of us have experienced the issue but you can very easily correct it. See this thread for more tips.


This is actually a really good post. I do occasionally put my hair in two plaits before I go to bed and put my cap on, which may be a contributor. I think I am Blessed is onto something here, particularly for those who are susceptible to the Wu problem.

Just don't splip your hair in the back FOR ANY REASON. When you comb, comb left back side, middle back, and right back side. Also when you sleep, make sure the back is gathered together, not split.
 
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Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
"Just don't splip your hair in the back FOR ANY REASON. When you comb, comb left back side, middle back, and right back side. Also when you sleep, make sure the back is gathered together, not split."




Thanks for adding the picture to your original post.

Now that you have posted your photo, I see, too. I agree with the above 100%. Please stop parting the hair down the middle in the back. Instead, add some hair from the left and add some hair from the right and make a braid that covers over that center part. You may have to stop wearing the [tight?] bun on top of your head for awhile, if not forever. Your hair is telling you that the way you are styling your hair may not be working for you. BUT, loosening buns at night and wetting the hair a bit remove any gel or other holding products can also alleviate the problem, in some cases.

@caribeandiva recently had that very same challenge. Maybe she can come in here and explain how she got her breakage and what she did to resolve her issue. I believe wearing a bun was what contributed to her issue as well.
 

Theresamonet

Well-Known Member
Just looking at your pics, yeah the W issue is common OP, many of us have experienced the issue but you can very easily correct it. See this thread for more tips.


This is actually a really good post. I do occasionally put my hair in two plaits before I go to bed and put my cap on, which may be a contributor. I think I am Blessed is onto something here, particularly for those who are susceptible to the Wu problem.

This is interesting. I almost always have my hair split down the middle. My everyday/in the house style is two Dutch braids pinned up. My hair has always grown in a U shape (so that area is the longest part of my hair).

Op, do you split your hair down the middle? I’m not sure why you’d have to in order to make a ponytail.
 

LushLox

Well-Known Member
This is interesting. I almost always have my hair split down the middle. My everyday/in the house style is two Dutch braids pinned up. My hair has always grown in a U shape (so that area is the longest part of my hair).

Op, do you split your hair down the middle? I’m not sure why you’d have to in order to make a ponytail.

I wear my hair exactly like that in the day time too. And I think that is okay, it's when you sleep with your hair like this, that may cause a problem, especially if you sleep on your back. But if you've never had a problem with thinness in the middle (which you don't) then I wouldn't change anything.

I'm just thinking of preventative action for myself as I've had issues before and I don't want them again.
 

Theresamonet

Well-Known Member
I wear my hair exactly like that in the day time too. And I think that is okay, it's when you sleep with your hair like this, that may cause a problem, especially if you sleep on your back. But if you've never had a problem with thinness in the middle (which you don't) then I wouldn't change anything.

I'm just thinking of preventative action for myself as I've had issues before and I don't want them again.

How do you change up your hair to go to bed? I do wear my hair that way to bed, and I try to sleep on my back (it’s better for the skin). Taking down my braids at night and redoing them each day seems like too much manipulation. I wear my braids wash to wash, unless I’m doing something special. I’m just asking for future reference, because never having had a problem doesn’t mean I never will.
 

abioni

Well-Known Member
I didn't split my hair in the middle to put it in the ponytail when I used to do it. I split in the middle yesterday and put it in two ponytails and I have changed the position several times since yesterday. Currently, they are in a low position, close to each ear. This allows me to lay down on my back until I fall asleep, then I lay on my side.

I have just also realized that I put it in ponytail while wet/damp before going to bed a lot. From my online research, this is a no no. I have been on this hair board for a long time and I'm still so clueless. It's so embarrassing. I thought I knew a lot about hair.

Thanks all for the tips!
 

caribeandiva

Human being
"Just don't splip your hair in the back FOR ANY REASON. When you comb, comb left back side, middle back, and right back side. Also when you sleep, make sure the back is gathered together, not split."




Thanks for adding the picture to your original post.

Now that you have posted your photo, I see, too. I agree with the above 100%. Please stop parting the hair down the middle in the back. Instead, add some hair from the left and add some hair from the right and make a braid that covers over that center part. You may have to stop wearing the [tight?] bun on top of your head for awhile, if not forever. Your hair is telling you that the way you are styling your hair may not be working for you. BUT, loosening buns at night and wetting the hair a bit remove any gel or other holding products can also alleviate the problem, in some cases.

@caribeandiva recently had that very same challenge. Maybe she can come in here and explain how she got her breakage and what she did to resolve her issue. I believe wearing a bun was what contributed to her issue as well.
The constant buns in the same spot probably contributed. My dermatologist told me that my breakage was caused by a seborrheic dermatitis flare up. A type of eczema of the scalp. I didn’t even know I had that. Putting gel and oils on my scalp must’ve caused it. I opted to big chop and start over. I kept the same regimen. I wear twist outs instead of buns and keep my scalp clear of everything except the meds he gave me if needed. No other oils, gels, or anything. I use oils on my hair just not my scalp. There is a difference. My hair has pretty much bounced back. I’ll get it straightened in December and I’ll do length check then. The breakage happened exactly 2 years ago.
8624F28E-AEEA-4631-8607-E372DEAE544D.jpeg
 

LushLox

Well-Known Member
How do you change up your hair to go to bed? I do wear my hair that way to bed, and I try to sleep on my back (it’s better for the skin). Taking down my braids at night and redoing them each day seems like too much manipulation. I wear my braids wash to wash, unless I’m doing something special. I’m just asking for future reference, because never having had a problem doesn’t mean I never will.

I always have my hair split in the middle when I sleep as well and I very rarely change it, just because it's convenient and easy. It just came as an epiphany when I was reading I am Blessed's (and Chicoro's) posts that got me thinking, was my previous nape thinning caused by splitting the hair and sleeping on it? Actually I think the cause was a mixture of things, the area (for me) is coarse but fragile, it doesn't necessarily get as much moisture as it needs because of the way a lot of people moisturise their hair, insufficient protein, and the ponytails and bunning.

I prefer sleeping on my back too; because of this thread, last night I just put my hair to the side in a low bun with no pins.I guess all you can do is carefully monitor if there is any problems that area. In the meantime I will alternate my hair, for when I sleep so low bun left to right and the occasional two plaits.

And yes and the bold is very true!

I didn't split my hair in the middle to put it in the ponytail when I used to do it. I split in the middle yesterday and put it in two ponytails and I have changed the position several times since yesterday. Currently, they are in a low position, close to each ear. This allows me to lay down on my back until I fall asleep, then I lay on my side.

I have just also realized that I put it in ponytail while wet/damp before going to bed a lot. From my online research, this is a no no. I have been on this hair board for a long time and I'm still so clueless. It's so embarrassing. I thought I knew a lot about hair.

Thanks all for the tips!

This works for a lot of people, but for many people it does not. This may be the issue for you, perhaps take a break from this and hopefully this will stop the issue.

Don't feel embarrassed - I surprise myself all the time about the things I am still learning about hair!
 
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starfish

Well-Known Member
I'm relaxed and wear a loose bun 5 days a week when I work out in the morning. Sometimes on the weekend. I wash my hair every Friday morning and just put it up on top of my head with a big clip. I vary the location of my buns and I use a satin hair band drenched in conditioner. Plus, sometimes I twist my hair to the right, sometimes I twist it to the left. When I go to bed I pin it up with a big clip and put the same hair band around the front of my hair to keep it smooth because I sleep really wild smh. Vary your buns and be sure to moisturize that area.
 
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