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"Isn't it unusual for black women to have long hair"

SoforReal

Well-Known Member
Yep the same thing happened to me. After wearing my hair in a bun for 2 weeks I finally wore it down to work. This white lady at my job said, "Oh did you get your hair put in". I was like huh? This is my hair! I know she felt stupid then. :nono:
 

Kawaii1

New Member
Genes play a role in hair type, however i do not believe in the part about genes cause the hair to grow to a certain point. Implying their hair stops growing. Im going to insist on Hair Grows however what you retain is a different story. But weather can affect the retention due to dryness and sun damage. Now thats a different story. The sun can be murder on hair. But I refuse to believe that hair only grows to a certain point.


I think I agree with this comment. I'm sure that once your hair grows to sl it doesn't stop growing and hard does not grow to sl and then fall out in massive amounts so logically speaking hair continues to grow but you lose some from breakage, probably most of it from breakage even if you take very good care of your hair. There really is no way to prevent breakage. Low mani helps and so does proper moisture/protein balance but at some point you must sort your hair and some of it will break. It's just about how much you break off.

One point that I can't help but bring up whenever people discuss black women and weaves is whites were so much weave. Not just celebrities. Those weaves just look likr their hair. Sure you get black girls wearing it more often but white girls wear a lot of weave to. I'm ppretty sure the weave industry does not run off black folks alone. There are 303,824,646 people in america. 81% are white and 12% are black. Now I don't know how much money is made yearly in the hair care industry but I know it's billions. For some reasons the population numbers vs. hair care indusrty billions don't add up to me. I don't think all weave money is coming from black women.

Let the media tell it and only black children are on food stamps but we know the main sutomers for W.I.C and aid are white folks.
 

JustKiya

Well-Known Member
Genes play a role in hair type, however i do not believe in the part about genes cause the hair to grow to a certain point. Implying their hair stops growing. Im going to insist on Hair Grows however what you retain is a different story. But weather can affect the retention due to dryness and sun damage. Now thats a different story. The sun can be murder on hair. But I refuse to believe that hair only grows to a certain point.

No, I will get some info for you. If you research the science of how the hair grows you will find information explaining the maximum length hair is genetically determined. Evolution and environment play a role in the expression of these genes.

Genes play a serious role in how long your hair will grow, in two ways.

Your MAXIMUM hair length is determined by multiplying your monthly growth rate, by the length of your growth (anagen) cycle. The average anagen cycle for head hair is 4-6 years. Both maximums (the maximum possible hair growth rate and the longest possible hair growth cycle) are genetically determined.
So, it is completely true that genetics DO set an upper limit to how long your hair can grow.
However! For most people, RETENTION is indeed the issue, and instead of acknowledging the fact that maybe, just maybe, it's how they are treating their hair that causes it to stay so short, they push the responsibility off of themselves, and blame it all on genes. :rolleyes:
It's rather like losing weight - yeah, you might be genetically predisposed to be fat, but that isn't the ONLY reason that you are, ya know?

Also, a fro that APPEARS to be two inches long, could be BSL - it all depends on your shrinkage. *looks for mscocoface and her amazing shrinking hair!*
 

ButterflyBeauty

New Member
Genes play a serious role in how long your hair will grow, in two ways.

Your MAXIMUM hair length is determined by multiplying your monthly growth rate, by the length of your growth (anagen) cycle. The average anagen cycle for head hair is 4-6 years. Both maximums (the maximum possible hair growth rate and the longest possible hair growth cycle) are genetically determined.
So, it is completely true that genetics DO set an upper limit to how long your hair can grow.
However! For most people, RETENTION is indeed the issue, and instead of acknowledging the fact that maybe, just maybe, it's how they are treating their hair that causes it to stay so short, they push the responsibility off of themselves, and blame it all on genes. :rolleyes:
It's rather like losing weight - yeah, you might be genetically predisposed to be fat, but that isn't the ONLY reason that you are, ya know?

Also, a fro that APPEARS to be two inches long, could be BSL - it all depends on your shrinkage. *looks for mscocoface and her amazing shrinking hair!*

Thanks for the additional info. We were discussing almond eyes comment on the fact that many African ( not African American) women only grow their hair to a maximum length, which tends to be "short". This may be a protective fact due to the environment. Maybe the body, if born in ceratin African environment adjusts the length of the growing cylcle to accomodate the environment and the most benefical hair length to that environment.
 

RegaLady

New Member
Dear Ladies,

In Africa for centuries women wore wigs to protect the hair from lice and dust. Wigs were also seen as a sign of mobility. When othrodox Jewish women get married they shave their heads and wear wigs for the rest of their lives. Women who have cancer don wigs. I don't understand how wigs got such a bad rap or became synonomous with not taking care of one's hair. Women on a whole adorn their hair wigs, colour, relaxers, etc because utimately that is the way we show our beauty to the opposite sex kind of like peacocks.

I think the reason why black women on a whole are not seen as having long hair is not because we are not capable, it is because again historically having long hair (hair that hangs/bone straight hair) or hair worn out was not a sign of beauty in many parts of Africa mostly because of the climate which is extremely hot. The focus was on a woman's neck, the smoothness of a woman's skin, her body so African women kept their hair short, in a wig (for special ceremonies), wrapped or in braids. However, now because centuries later Western images have bombarded women as to what is beautiful, everyone including black/African women want straight long hair that hangs as a sign of beauty. I am not saying that it is wrong either to have such desires but it's important to know where those desires come from historically and that we as African peoples still are tied to our traditions even though some of it has been lost which is why we love our wigs and sometimes 'outrageous' hair styles.

While I have no problem with relaxers, once they became introduced into the mainstream society, the original formulas were very damaging and caused many black women breakage (not necessarily because of lack of care) which is how damaged hair became linked to black women. Some black women cannot wear relaxers no matter how well they take care of their hair and some black women cannot grow long hair no matter how well they take of it too. If you are able to grow long hair power to you but if not it does not mean that you are unable to take care of your hair.

Best,
Almond Eyes

:clap::clap::clap:I agree with everything you just said.
I am also half Nigerian, half American. My father is Nigerian. My mother is black with a bunch of things.:look: Being exposed to different cultures have taught me that not everyone, needs long hair, or feel it is an ideal. It is a Western culture thing, for black women to grow there hair realllllly long. It is not at all a bad thing, but we have a beauty that doesn't need it. I guess the Nigerian side of me always thought showing off your neck was a very sexy thing. It plays a part in why I wore my hair short for so long. And many African women have beautiful necks. If someone came to tell me that my hair was short, it wouldn't insult me. I just don't find it being a negative thing.:ohwell: Long hair is beautiful, but even if we couldn't grow it long, it shouldn't matter. Healthy hair a must, though! :lachen:Don't get me wrong, I wanna grow my hair out, just like the next gal on this board. I say it once, I will say it again, I don't think black women need to be so caught up in what people, men, different ethnicities, think about our hair. That's how we got into this hair abusing stuff in the first place!:ohwell:
 

ButterflyBeauty

New Member
:clap::clap::clap:I agree with everything you just said.
I am also half Nigerian, half American. My father is Nigerian. My mother is black with a bunch of things.:look: Being exposed to different cultures have taught me that not everyone, needs long hair, or feel it is an ideal. It is a Western culture thing, for black women to grow there hair realllllly long. It is not at all a bad thing, but we have a beauty that doesn't need it. I guess the Nigerian side of me always thought showing off your neck was a very sexy thing. It plays a part in why I wore my hair short for so long. And many African women have beautiful necks. If someone came to tell me that my hair was short, it wouldn't insult me. I just don't find it being a negative thing.:ohwell: Long hair is beautiful, but even if we couldn't grow it long, it shouldn't matter. Healthy hair a must, though! :lachen:Don't get me wrong, I wanna grow my hair out, just like the next gal on this board. I say it once, I will say it again, I don't think black women need to be so caught up in what people, men, different ethnicities, think about our hair. That's how we got into this hair abusing stuff in the first place!:ohwell:


I think you are right also. I am also American and Nigerian (Yuroba). This hair length thing is definately a western ideal. However, it is still pervasive in Africa. I don't know if you have been to Nigeria, but straight long hair is an ideal of beauty in the larger cities, not so much with people who still live in the Bush (country side)
 

ButterflyBeauty

New Member
Thanks for the additional info. We were discussing almond eyes comment on the fact that many African ( not African American) women only grow their hair to a maximum length, which tends to be "short". This may be a protective fact due to the environment. Maybe the body, if born in ceratin African environment adjusts the length of the growing cylcle to accomodate the environment and the most benefical hair length to that environment.

It is the age old debate of Nature vs. Nurture. I personally don't see anything wrong with a head full of healthy shoulder length hair. If your body only grows you hair to shoulder length, but you care for that shoulder length hair well who cares if society comments about black women having "short" hair.
 

RegaLady

New Member
I think you are right also. I am also American and Nigerian (Yuroba). This hair length thing is definately a western ideal. However, it is still pervasive in Africa. I don't know if you have been to Nigeria, but straight long hair is an ideal of beauty in the larger cities, not so much with people who still live in the Bush (country side)

I have been to Nigeria, Imo State, as I am Igbo!:grin: And it is an ideal there, however, it is greatly influenced by Beyonce, and alot of American celebrities! What can I say Western culture has taken over. It isn't a bad thing, but it's like nothing is preserved.:perplexed
 

RegaLady

New Member
It is the age old debate of Nature vs. Nurture. I personally don't see anything wrong with a head full of healthy shoulder length hair. If your body only grows you hair to shoulder length, but you care for that shoulder length hair well who cares if society comments about black women having "short" hair.
There is nothing wrong with having long hair,at all. Heck I want it, and I would like to have some now!:lachen: I think that we are soo caught up in what society says a black woman has, or doesn't have. All I'm saying is does it really matter, and should it? But, I hear ya!:grin:
 

almond eyes

Well-Known Member
Dear Ladies,

I think this is a healthy debate even if not everyone agrees with my viewpoint. And I enjoy different viewpoints because it forces me to think.

I guess it is like body hair, some people just don't have it and some do. And I am not saying that being mixed means one can grow hair because I know many mixed women who also have a hard time growing their hair past a certain length. I am also half-Nigerian and I still think that there are some black/African women who can only grow hair to a maximum length and some of it may be due to genetics and environment (over time). I have a Ugandan friend who has locks and it took literally six years before they started dropping and I have cousins who have had afros that stay the same length and even with the stretch thing it's still short. For many African women (non-mixed) growing what is considered long hair (SL) is not a reality or else many women in Africa would have shoulder lenght hair. It's just not in the genetic coding but it does not mean it is impossible or that there are no exceptions to the rule. And I have had other ethnic groups make comments to me not only about black women not being able to have long hair but also about features but it does not bother me as long as they are not denigrating. However, I would be amiss to say that straight long hair is a sign of beauty these days and nothing is wrong with wanting that look but at the same time we have to be honest in that the value of short hair is not on the same level as long hair.

Best,
Almond Eyes
 

Riverwalk

Active Member
Am I the only one who doesn't equate extensions with being bald? We're not the only ones who wear them so why is it that when others wear extensions its not seen as abnomal?

I am glad you stated that here. I was just thinking the same thing. I mean, yes, when we go out we may see mostly black women sporting weaves, wigs, braids, but you know, they may also have long hair as well, and may just be protecting their hair too!

Of course there are those that have the addicted to weave/braids syndrome (and, in turn, may not have long hair), but just like some of the women on the board that wear protective styles, they may just be protecting their hair with braids and weaves (who knows, some of them may even be members and we just don't know it!)
 

Crystalicequeen123

Well-Known Member
Dear Ladies,

I think this is a healthy debate even if not everyone agrees with my viewpoint. And I enjoy different viewpoints because it forces me to think.

I guess it is like body hair, some people just don't have it and some do. And I am not saying that being mixed means one can grow hair because I know many mixed women who also have a hard time growing their hair past a certain length. I am also half-Nigerian and I still think that there are some black/African women who can only grow hair to a maximum length and some of it may be due to genetics and environment (over time). I have a Ugandan friend who has locks and it took literally six years before they started dropping and I have cousins who have had afros that stay the same length and even with the stretch thing it's still short. For many African women (non-mixed) growing what is considered long hair (SL) is not a reality or else many women in Africa would have shoulder lenght hair. It's just not in the genetic coding but it does not mean it is impossible or that there are no exceptions to the rule. And I have had other ethnic groups make comments to me not only about black women not being able to have long hair but also about features but it does not bother me as long as they are not denigrating. However, I would be amiss to say that straight long hair is a sign of beauty these days and nothing is wrong with wanting that look but at the same time we have to be honest in that the value of short hair is not on the same level as long hair.

Best,
Almond Eyes


I don't know..... I'm trying to see both sides of the coin here. And I agree, some of what you all are saying does make a little bit of sense.

BUT!!! I've seen otherwise. Which is fine...we're all entitled to our own different opinions. :yep: It makes the world more interesting. I suppose maybe what I've seen is just not "the norm" I guess for African women. But I doubt it has anything to do with "genes". :rolleyes:

For example... I have 2 friends from....oh goodness...where were they from?? I want to say Ghana. Anyway, I had two friends from Ghana (sisters), and when I FIRST met them like over 10 years ago, their hair was SHORT. One sister's hair was so short it was cut like a Halle Berry type cut. The younger sister's hair was about neck length. Over the years of knowing them, one of the girls (the one I was closer friend's with) started going to the Dominican hair salons. In fact, she was the one who introduced me to them! Granted, I tried them out a few times, but I just realized that my fine type 4a/b hair couldn't take those hot dryers! :lol:

Anyway, by the time my friend graduated from college, her hair was now at least bra strap length. Her hair was at least boobie-length, so I know for sure that her hair had to be at least bra strap length! Not only that, but her older sister (remember her with the Halle Berry cut?) HER hair had grown too and was allllll the way down her back. Not quite as long as her younger sister's but it was LONG! When I saw them, I was like: :eek2: I couldn't believe it!! I never really asked them what they did really, except I just noticed that my friend's hair was just really healthy looking, thick, and was growing like a weed! And on TOP of that, they are *PURE* African (if there's such a thing :rolleyes: ), meaning, their mother AND father are BOTH African. I think even they lived in Africa/were born in Africa. So....what does that tell you?

I seriously think that either they found the LHCF, or they knew of some hair-growing tips because their hair did a complete turn around. You hear me?? :lachen: She and her older sister's hair grew something major. Don't get me wrong...their hair never looked unhealthy when it was shorter, it just wasn't as thick and long until some years later. I know my friend had a relaxer in her hair too, because she would talk about getting a "touchup", so I know they weren't natural. :yep: So, I dont' know what they did, but they definitely turned their hair around.

I don't know what they were doing...but they were doing something. :sekret:

I say this just to prove that in my experience, African hair DOES grow. Now, maybe they'll never have butt-length hair or what not, but I'm telling you, their hair is longer than mine has EVER been, and they are 100% African, while I'm half/half. Also, another thing...a friend of mine is also mixed african just like me, but she has never kept good care of her hair, and so her hair has never been longer than neck length. So...as you see...a lot of times it's not always "the genes". A lot of times it's what you do to your hair, and your habits.

Just a thought! :)
 

Barbara

Princess
i can see why she feels that way. many black women choose not to or dont know how to care for their hair. i have a friend who has a nice grade of hair. very soft and curly, think lisa bonet. anyway her hair never grew past nl and could barely fit into a ponytail. she recently got locks and its only been one year since her bc and she is a little past sl now. she uses great products now and she loves her hair. you have to know whats best for you inorder for it to grow and you to love your hair.


I've seen her name and avatar on this board several times. I guess she's a member now.
 

glamazon386

Well-Known Member
:ohwell:

There unfortunately is some truth to the statement. Many, many black women have short hair, can't grow their hair and wear wigs and weaves to cover it.

However, you've got to be pretty ignorant to think that we are incapable of growing long hair. Or that it's some astounding, amazing discovery to find a black woman with long hair.

I wouldn't get mad. We all know that's just how it is...

I would agree. I mean if that's all they see what are they supposed to think?
 

Hair Iam

Well-Known Member
Dear Ladies,

I am West African and long hair is not prized in the society though now with all of the Western images from the music videos, there is pressure for African women to have long hair. It's not offensive if someone says that most black women have short hair, though I understand I myself hate generalisations and it is the way that someone says something that makes a difference. So what if we have short hair, we have beautiful skin tones and features and we don't age quickly. I guess the issue of hair is such a sensitive issue for black women in the States and we have to prove that we are still pretty or feminine to other races. However, I have to say that while we black women are to a degree obsessed about our hair, white women talk about their weight issues constantly and they are also obsessed with hair colouring which I often bring to their attention.

Best,
Almond Eyes

Well stated:yep:
 

almond eyes

Well-Known Member
Dear Ladies,

Good points.

Yes, it is true that there are some exceptions to the rule but again very few compared to the majority. I know African women who have thick SL hair and they are not mixed; but then again we don't know for sure because having a certain complexion and features does not mean one cannot have mixed genes (Arab/African or African/Indian). But again, I know many black/African women who take very good care of their hair and still their hair does not grow past a certain length. I don't buy that African women have to come to America to learn how to take care of their hair. It's kind of like saying that Jewish women have prominent noses. This is true that many of them have prominent noses but there are some who are exceptions to the rule.

Best,
Almond Eyes
 

2Bossay

New Member
hmmmm...itz funny that u brought up the issue about *white women * obsessing with their weight all the time...while yez, itz true a lot of black women wear weavez, white women wear a hell of alot more of them then u can imagine...lol...most people would b surprised how many *white women* wear them...celebrities included...the only difference with them & black women iz that u just dont c them in the hood @ ur local BSS buying them...they're @ the high end beauty salonz getting theirs put in by their *stylists*...but i aint the 1 to gossip...so u didnt hear that from me...lol...:grin:
 

glamazon386

Well-Known Member
hmmmm...itz funny that u brought up the issue about *white women * obsessing with their weight all the time...while yez, itz true a lot of black women wear weavez, white women wear a hell of alot more of them then u can imagine...lol...most people would b surprised how many *white women* wear them...celebrities included...the only difference with them & black women iz that u just dont c them in the hood @ ur local BSS buying them...they're @ the high end beauty salonz getting theirs put in by their *stylists*...but i aint the 1 to gossip...so u didnt hear that from me...lol...:grin:

I would beg to differ. Yes we know a lot of white women wear extensions. Especially celebrities but that's not the same as nearly ALL the black women people encounter wearing weaves. There is no comparison. People just assume we're all bald. They don't assume that about white women whether they wear weave or not. And the majority of the time they're just adding not trying to cover up broken damaged short hair. I mean neither are all black women but the majority of us who wear weaves do not have long hair and that is why we wear the weave. It is what it is...
 

jamiss

Member
hmmmm...itz funny that u brought up the issue about *white women * obsessing with their weight all the time...while yez, itz true a lot of black women wear weavez, white women wear a hell of alot more of them then u can imagine...lol...most people would b surprised how many *white women* wear them...celebrities included...the only difference with them & black women iz that u just dont c them in the hood @ ur local BSS buying them...they're @ the high end beauty salonz getting theirs put in by their *stylists*...but i aint the 1 to gossip...so u didnt hear that from me...lol...:grin:

And they pay a lot for them. A LOT! I remember when the lady who used to braid my hair started doing weaves for ww- she was charging them 3 and 4 times what she charged bw because she could! Not because their hair was harder for her to do, they just didn't know any better.
 

2Bossay

New Member
wow itz ironic that u just responded 2 thiz post, bcuz i just posted a comment on ur blog...but um in response to what u said about the majority of black women wearing weavez bcuz of the length of their hair...well i 4 1 dont wear a weave bcuz of the length of my hair...my hair is a few inchez from APL...i wear it 4 convenience, it can b less time consuming, 2 definitely give my hair a much needed break from heat, & just bcuz i'm straight up lazy period!!!...lol...nothing more nothing less...regardless 2 what black women may wear their weavez 4, it doesnt give anyone the right to assume itz bcuz we're ALL bald & can't grow hair...that waz just an ignorant assumption 4 anyone 2 make...
 

2Bossay

New Member
And they pay a lot for them. A LOT! I remember when the lady who used to braid my hair started doing weaves for ww- she was charging them 3 and 4 times what she charged bw because she could! Not because their hair was harder for her to do, they just didn't know any better.

tru tru...they definitely don't kno any better...lol...& it doez tend 2 b a little harder 2 do their hair az opposed 2 *our* hair...but they definitely pay a grip for their weavez...lol...*high 5'z* Jaime...lol:grin:
 

bravenewgirl87

New Member
No, genes do play a role in hair length. Due to the environment in Africa it is not necessarily benefical to have loads of hair on your head. Adaptation to the climate may be one of the reasons that some African women and men have hair that grows to a certain point. I think AlmondEyes is right on point.

I am taking anatomy and we just studied the hair, skin and nails. Genetics have no influence on how hair grows. None.:nono: What texture it grows in? possibly. But not how hair can grow.
 

bravenewgirl87

New Member
Genes play a serious role in how long your hair will grow, in two ways.

Your MAXIMUM hair length is determined by multiplying your monthly growth rate, by the length of your growth (anagen) cycle. The average anagen cycle for head hair is 4-6 years. Both maximums (the maximum possible hair growth rate and the longest possible hair growth cycle) are genetically determined.
So, it is completely true that genetics DO set an upper limit to how long your hair can grow.
However! For most people, RETENTION is indeed the issue, and instead of acknowledging the fact that maybe, just maybe, it's how they are treating their hair that causes it to stay so short, they push the responsibility off of themselves, and blame it all on genes. :rolleyes:
It's rather like losing weight - yeah, you might be genetically predisposed to be fat, but that isn't the ONLY reason that you are, ya know?

Also, a fro that APPEARS to be two inches long, could be BSL - it all depends on your shrinkage. *looks for mscocoface and her amazing shrinking hair!*


no, it doesn't. Thats only one strand. A new one will pop right back in, so how can a limit be set? There is ABSO-POSITIVE-LUTELY NO LIMIT ON THE LENGTH YOUR HAIR CAN GROW nor does genetics affect it. Its the same for every single person.
 
I used to be ignorant and also think that our hair wouldn't grow that long. My hair and that of my family members was always "tore up from the floor up."

Since coming to this site, I've learned about protective styles (my favorite) and really how to maintain our hair. I can't believe how long my is now. :)
 

bravenewgirl87

New Member
I am glad you stated that here. I was just thinking the same thing. I mean, yes, when we go out we may see mostly black women sporting weaves, wigs, braids, but you know, they may also have long hair as well, and may just be protecting their hair too!

Of course there are those that have the addicted to weave/braids syndrome (and, in turn, may not have long hair), but just like some of the women on the board that wear protective styles, they may just be protecting their hair with braids and weaves (who knows, some of them may even be members and we just don't know it!)

I work at a gym with many bigwigs attend and I know more than enough of them wear weaves.
 

JustKiya

Well-Known Member
Genes play a serious role in how long your hair will grow, in two ways.

Your MAXIMUM hair length is determined by multiplying your monthly growth rate, by the length of your growth (anagen) cycle. The average anagen cycle for head hair is 4-6 years. Both maximums (the maximum possible hair growth rate and the longest possible hair growth cycle) are genetically determined.
So, it is completely true that genetics DO set an upper limit to how long your hair can grow.
However! For most people, RETENTION is indeed the issue, and instead of acknowledging the fact that maybe, just maybe, it's how they are treating their hair that causes it to stay so short, they push the responsibility off of themselves, and blame it all on genes. :rolleyes:
It's rather like losing weight - yeah, you might be genetically predisposed to be fat, but that isn't the ONLY reason that you are, ya know?

Also, a fro that APPEARS to be two inches long, could be BSL - it all depends on your shrinkage. *looks for mscocoface and her amazing shrinking hair!*

no, it doesn't. Thats only one strand. A new one will pop right back in, so how can a limit be set? There is ABSO-POSITIVE-LUTELY NO LIMIT ON THE LENGTH YOUR HAIR CAN GROW nor does genetics affect it. Its the same for every single person.

Let me see if I can be a little clearer.

Lets say, that you gain 1/2 an inch a month, and your growth cycle (anagen) is five years, then the hair enters catagen (rest stage) and then telogen (shed stage).
That means that every year, you gain 6 inches of hair, and that hair stays attached to your head for five years. Over that time, that one strand (because each strand acts the same, just with different start times), would become a total of 30 inches - because of your personal genetics, that's the longest any single strand of hair on your head will EVER grow - and each strand behaves the same way. Thus, the longest that your hair will get is 30 inches, because when that 'new' hair pops out - it's STILL only going to grow 1/2 inch a month, and it's STILL only going to stay on your head for 5 years. Period.

I'm sorry, but you are simply mistaken. Do a little research on the hair cycle, and you will see that. If after you do the research, you still don't believe that hair DOES have a genetic preset limit (also known as terminal length) - I'm sure there will be lots of people very interested in your findings. :rolleyes:
 

almond eyes

Well-Known Member
Dear Ladies,

All great points.

I have to play devil's advocate, what about body hair?. Many Black/African women are not capable of growing body hair so why can't the same be said about hair on the head?. When I say not capable of growing hair, obviously I don't mean that the person is bald or hairless but that it just doesn't grow long. I know of some African women who love hairy arms (in some parts of Africa like Senegal, Rwanda and Congo, hairy arms and legs is seen as sexy by men) and they use concoctions to grow it but it just doesn't.

Best,
Almond eyes
 

HairBarbie

Well-Known Member
Dear Ladies,

All great points.

I have to play devil's advocate, what about body hair?. Many Black/African women are not capable of growing body hair so why can't the same be said about hair on the head?. When I say not capable of growing hair, obviously I don't mean that the person is bald or hairless but that it just doesn't grow long. I know of some African women who love hairy arms (in some parts of Africa like Senegal, Rwanda and Congo, hairy arms and legs is seen as sexy by men) and they use concoctions to grow it but it just doesn't.

Best,
Almond eyes

I have never heard of black/African women not being able to grow body hair. 99% of black women can get up to at LEAST APL is they take great care of their hair.

I've also never heard of African women using concotions to grow body hair. Besides you can't really compare body hair to the hair that grows on your head.

ETA: Why do people question there being a 100% African person, but never question if all Europeans are 100% European/White.
 
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MizzBrown

Well-Known Member
Let me see if I can be a little clearer.

Lets say, that you gain 1/2 an inch a month, and your growth cycle (anagen) is five years, then the hair enters catagen (rest stage) and then telogen (shed stage).
That means that every year, you gain 6 inches of hair, and that hair stays attached to your head for five years. Over that time, that one strand (because each strand acts the same, just with different start times), would become a total of 30 inches - because of your personal genetics, that's the longest any single strand of hair on your head will EVER grow - and each strand behaves the same way. Thus, the longest that your hair will get is 30 inches, because when that 'new' hair pops out - it's STILL only going to grow 1/2 inch a month, and it's STILL only going to stay on your head for 5 years. Period.

I'm sorry, but you are simply mistaken. Do a little research on the hair cycle, and you will see that. If after you do the research, you still don't believe that hair DOES have a genetic preset limit (also known as terminal length) - I'm sure there will be lots of people very interested in your findings. :rolleyes:

PREACH!!!! :yep: ITA! I educated myself as well and you are right on point. I noticed that while being on these boards. How can some take care of their hair better than others, yet still can't retain length while others go from SL to MBL in like a year. WTF?

Genetics plays a HUGE part. Tis the reason why I am not going to go plumb fool trying to acheive WL hair and wonder what's wrong with me cause i can't get there after being a 10 yr LHCF veteran.:rolleyes:

You can try to retain all you want but when that Telogen phase rolls around and your genetics decide to keep you in that shedding phase LONGER than the next human being, then what can you do?

There are people out there who's hair can actually just stay in the anagen phase longer than others and who can have hair to the ground, thus them being in Guiness Book of Records and such...
 
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