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It's Just Hair Isn't It? South African Doc sparks weave vs natural hair debate.

EssenceOfBeauty

Well-Known Member
3 rd Degree | It is just hair isn't it?

Part One
Part Two
Part Three

3rd degree makes waves over weaves

June 29 2012 at 07:15am
By Esther Lewis
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INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPERS
Theo Lethobane gets her hair braided at a stall at Cape Town station. Picture: Thomas Holder

Cape Town - Investigative television programme 3rd Degree has people questioning the motive behind its investigation into ethnic hair.
People on Twitter and women in salons on the station deck have been discussing the programme, which was aired on Tuesday evening.
In it, 3rd Degree’s Debora Patta looked into the world of weave versus natural hair.
Introducing the topic, Patta the described the issue as contentious and said it was “about race, Western versus African ideals”.
Patta featured TV presenter and poet Lebo Mashile and self-proclaimed weave queen Bonang Matheba on opposite ends of the debate.
Even before the show aired, people took issue with the content.
Debora Patta. Picture: Bongiwe Mchunu
INLSA

Many questioned why, in the midst of other serious issues, Patta would “investigate” this particular topic.
Mabine Seabe tweeted: “Debora Patta, eTV, and 3rd Degree MUST issue an apology for subjecting South Africa to nonsense masquerading as investigative journalism.”
But Patta said topics they chose for the show were always varied and that the show was about black women, identity and the understanding of beauty.
Theo Lethobane, getting her hair done at a Cape Town station salon, said she was not trying to be white by wearing a weave. “I’m just trying to look beautiful,” she said.
Lethobane said that she often wore her hair naturally, and put in extensions once a month.
Salon owner Ethel Shelove said more people preferred to keep their hair natural.
Many who wore weaves said they did so because they wanted variety and to keep their men happy.
Shelove said her customer base was not only black women and that many white and coloured women also had their hair done.
Some tweeters felt that white people shouldn’t deal with the topic.
@Thandoza tweeted: “Not sure if white ppl shd touch that subject.”
However, Patta said she was “infinitely acquainted with black hair”.
Patta said her daughter had black hair, and topics like afro combs to relaxers had come up.
“The fact that so many people are talking about it, shows that it struck a cord,” said Patta.
She felt that the response was not unusual. There was discussion around the show each week.
Some managed to see the light side.
Comedian and afro sporting Marc Lottering tweeted: “3rd Degree! Who knew hair would cause such a thing in SA?! Up until today I thought a blow was a good career move. I’m learning I’m learning!” - Cape Argus



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RegaLady

New Member
Interesting piece. I enjoyed watching it:yep:. No different then other documentaries and talks about hair, but still it was interesting to watch a perception outside of US.
 

Dellas

Well-Known Member
Have I ever seen an investigative report or even a movie on white women wearing wigs or dying their hair or people with curly hair making their hair straight ...trying to look less Jewish or whatever their ethnicity.

The hatred and disdain for black women is palpable from all....
 
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beana

Well-Known Member
I'm sure her "findings" are inaccurate and skewed since its impossible for her to fully understand our hair, culture, etc etc.

She's a typical ww though, sticking her long nose into our affairs and telling us how we should feel about things in our community.
 

MrsJaiDiva

Embracing the Light
I have to wonder...will we ever escape from this?? Will we ever be in a place where everything we do and say isn't examined, and discussed to the n'th degree? Can we just be in a place where we style our hair in a way that pleases us, and not have to worry about how that style is seen?

I'm natural. That doesn't mean I'm trying to reclaim a lost heritage.
I'm texturized/texlaxed/relaxed. That doesn't mean that I'm ashamed of my African heritage. It doesn't mean I'm ashamed of the hair that grows out of my head.

Ii feel like its too easy to pin weaves, wigs, and relaxers on race. I think it's now WP looking for absolution. If they can point out what they did in the past, they can apologize and "give us their blessings" to be ourselves....even though we already ARE ourselves. They can then throw up their hands and say "It's not us anymore! We WANT ou to look "natural"! Racism is a myth!"...and we all know that's BS. This isn't to say that there aren't people who wig/weave/relax for reasons with racial motivators...but I feel they are the vast minority. No matter how you slice it, im Black. Even with a blond weave, blue contacts, and white foundation..i am Black! And if I'm black, that means there is no being "not as black as"...because I'm Black! That's it!

I think this is just another example of hegemony....and I don't need Anyone telling me what I need to look like to be my most authentic self.
 

Maguerite

Well-Known Member
A lot of people in the world need a scapegoat, someone to point at, ridicule or just to feel they with all their issues; are better than. BW are filling in that gap and unless we fight it and refuse to play victim it will continue till some better scapegoat comes along. It's a shame BM are not vocal and decisive about speaking out against the way their BW are treated because when the men in a group stand together, defend their womenfolk and make it clear disrespect will not be tolerated most people back off. But BW are exposed & vulnerable as a collective so it's free for all.
 
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Ogoma

Well-Known Member
AnointedandAmazing

We don't have to be exposed or vulnerable or wait for black men. One of the reasons this continues is because a large number of black women participate in it. We should be able to do whatever the hell we want with our hair regardless of our reasons and be left alone. Where is the dissecting of white women's blonde obsession? Asian women's eye fold surgeries? We all know about it, but they refuse to make it a central part of their identity. Some black women are just excited to be getting attention they don't care what it comes with.
 

Maguerite

Well-Known Member
Ogoma said:
AnointedandAmazing

We don't have to be exposed or vulnerable or wait for black men. One of the reasons this continues is because a large number of black women participate in it. We should be able to do whatever the hell we want with our hair regardless of our reasons and be left alone. Where is the dissecting of white women's blonde obsession? Asian women's eye fold surgeries? We all know about it, but they refuse to make it a central part of their identity. Some black women are just excited to be getting attention they don't care what it comes with.

Sorry but this is the way it works in the real world. Yep we can go on all day about the strong-no man needing- super BW while the unmarried rate remains high, the OOW rates are out of control and because they are given a pass no one is holding absent Black fathers accountable. It has long been a trueism that the men of any group fight for & protect the women & kids jn the group; it's more subtly done in modern times but holds just much water today. This is why missing black girls are ignored & rappers bash BW without consequences, among other ills. No other group is bashed as often or cruelly as BW & though each group has issues which sometimes make headlines, none are quite in the same boat or truly share the same experiences & challenges as BW.
The usual derailing argument runs along the lines of 'well other BW do/say it too' or 'well White people also do such & such too' or 'well my life/friends/family are great so i have no idea what you're on about'.
The facts & reality remain the same and I for one do not shy away or make excuses for the social norms & trends before my eyes.
 
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