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Kira Johnson Spoke 5 Languages, Raced Cars. She Still Died In Childbirth.

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Black women in the US, in general, are high context. That means that we like a lot of detail and information, especially from the doctor. I know I can't speak for you, but asking a lot of questions is very common for black woman.
So true but its not translating to assertiveness in the appropriate setting where it would save us....
For me and my reality---yep. My sisters, my mom, my aunts, my cousins are very high context (I love this term!)

The women I work with make me want to scream. I spend much time begging and encouraging them to speak up and to have an advocate or two who will speak up on their behalf.

Cause my husband is like Kira's husband and tends to step back some....so I had my boss and sister on speed dial and my doula there (an HBCU student and sista) to be there as my second. Having a doula there will make ALL the difference.

In my field of Public health for low income women and families of young kids/babies, and many are the educated ones who are first generation college grads, first generation real money, real jobs....they don't speak up enough. My MIL is DEAD because of the quiet and just refusal to think of herself over all others. I have met MEDICAL doctors who clam up because while they are medical doctors in other fields...something about going through childbirth (especially a non-ideal labor and delivery) just sends them back to a meekness you have never seen. One doctor (a Pediatrician) said EVERYONE ASSUMED she'd have no problem nursing. She struggled so bad, never asked for extra help and was supplementing within a week and stopped shortly after. She regrets not speaking up and not admitting that she needed help. Me: I'm a WHOLE lactation counselor and demanded a lactation nurse be at my bedside when I finally got up the next day. I didn't want the floor nurse who had "basic training" in breastfeeding, I wanted that expert.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
There is a real dynamic that affects a significant subset of black women that is really the OPPOSITE of what we are accused of being: Loud, brash, and angry/bitter...we talk about it a lot: Its that "save everyone" mentality we've developed to our demise. And its 10000% unfair cause I'm not victim blaming AT ALL. I think there needs to be conversation about the CULTURE of the American BW....to have a desire to help all others....society's disgusting demand that we basically be mules (mammies), while low-key fetishizing us (even WW), that creates this BS and disgusting belief that we are super strong and don't need/REQUIRE help and if we are asking for help, we must be some kind of outlier that needs to be 1) ignored or worse 2) discouraged from being so needy and then basically ignored, not getting the help we need.

This will only change if medicine changes. it will but it will be a while.
The ONLY solution/CURE is self-empowerment:
1) creating a village of like-minded women and mothers who empower each other
2) Getting more BW to be doulas, birth workers, CLC's (its a quick easy course) anyone can take it---(I'll post information in another comment)
3) Encouraging ALL women of all backgrounds to have a doula or extra birth worker attending all births until it becomes the norm.
4) If you are in a non-health field but want to become a mom, take an online training, or encourage a friend who is interested in this stuff to take the training (see my next comment). I don't care if you are in the financial sector, a teacher, whatever....a simple online investment may save your life bc it will give you a language and a verbiage you need to be able to pull a Serena and ask for the stuff you need. We already know our sisters (WE) are vulnerable and we can no longer lay down).
4. Getting an advocate in the birthing room and stop making it a celebration. You don't need a whole bunch of look-a-whoers in the birthing room. In ancient times several people attended the birth, but all the attendees had a skill set that could be tapped in the event of a problem. Other than hubby, everyone else is an ONLOOKER. My husband attended and did skin to skin...but he wasn't MY DOULA. She knows the language of the medical issues and can speak quickly and directly to nurses, CNAs, the doctor, staff, etc. Its not instinctual for hubby nor my mom.
5. We need to get back to the attention and understanding that risk to the mom is a problem and care for the mom is important. Doctor is there for baby....doula is there for me.
6. Post partum care is needed. We now have "Post partum doulas' that can be hired to basically take care of thins after birth. I'm a runner and walker for exercise, but at day 8 post partum, hubby didn't realize I cannot walk around the block even though he insisted I get up and going. My bleeding was subsiding until that little walk. I showed him my heavy pad and he was shocked. But he needed to see it so he could STFU and humble himself to the awe of post partum. The post partum care is them doing chores, cleaning, cooking, etc. Stuff our mamas and aunties and grannies used to do. Stuff Japanese mothers have built an industry out of since about 20 years ago (a desire to get back to their own roots), and African and Arabic mothers and aunts have been doing for centuries---that ol' 40 day shut in time people ignore these days. I did it except for attending doc appointments and the breastfeeding support. I broke my rule 1-2 times then quickly sat on down. Many women don't have people in their lives willing to do this. Even I temporarily bought into the BS of being superwoman. Temporarily.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
If you are reading this and plan to have a baby soon: I'm talking to YOU. You are a black woman and are at risk. You NEED to invest in a GOOD DOULA who will advocate for you. If all you can find is a white one: Hire her and here is why: Doula's are trained the same and are in the field because they don't think like traditional practitioners. Black or white they are like-minded and basically are not stuttin the doctor they are worried about you. Interview her. The white doulas in my community are sending these articles around about Kira as we speak. They get it and I let them shut down their white counterparts who attempt to say its not real. In the interview, if she is aware and believes the issue with black women is real, she should be on your short list.
If you are educated IDGAF take the Lamaze class, the prenatal course, you tube and talk to your OB. I had 7 years of education on all things baby before I conceived. I still had a preemie at 23 weeks. But at 6 weeks I called my insurance wondering what I was looking at financially if I had one. what benefits (hospital grade pump) would I get for having one? what is needed. I'm crazy but in the chaos of her birth, a lot of things fell into place because I knew the language and what to do if you have a preemie. So she survived and thrived despite a 95% chance that she wasn't supposed to. Pregnancy is beautiful but its a huge risk and the ancestors wasn't playing about being close to death. Closest to death.

I am working with Doulas for a barter and trade system so that the poorest mamas can afford her services. They need them THE MOST.
In a perfect world, insurance will cover their services. Soon come I hope.
 

Sarabellam

Well-Known Member
If something is going wrong get as many people notified as possible. Call the nurse, doctor, even get on the phone and call the umbudsman office right then.

Unfortunately people in important positions are still people and their work can suffer from everything from laziness, work dissatisfaction, simple mistakes, and of course racism and sexism.
 

Shula

Well-Known Member
If you are looking for a Doula:
The National Black Doula Association.
DONA www.dona.org to become trained as one or encourage a friend who is possibly pre-med, pre-lactation consultant, a student interested in social work, a student interested in health, a nurse, or just interested in working in ANY capacity of the health/maternal health, infant health field.


Thank you so much! These posts are gold. I would print them out if I were still in child bearing age. I love the health field because of being forced to be around it and I would LOVE to become a doula. Your timing on this is so odd because I just read the Jamilah Lemieux is going through the training a few days back and I discussed it with my girls. If I can get my health stabilized enough, I'm going for it. Thanks for the org info and always invaluable posts.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Thank you so much! These posts are gold. I would print them out if I were still in child bearing age. I love the health field because of being forced to be around it and I would LOVE to become a doula. Your timing on this is so odd because I just read the Jamilah Lemieux is going through the training a few days back and I discussed it with my girls. If I can get my health stabilized enough, I'm going for it. Thanks for the org info and always invaluable posts.
No problem.
I love ya'll.
I want the best for us. We may be the only village for someone here.
Erykah Badu is a Doula. So yeah----anyone can and should if its feasible.

Imagine it, a friend from your community, she may be a singer by trade, a banker by trade, but she attends YOUR BIRTH....That's what the ancients did.
 

DeepBluSea

Well-Known Member
Ya know Serena Williams said they didn’t want to listen to her when she said something wasn’t right. And she has a history of clotting!

Pregnant black women are at higher risk than other women. Even accounting for higher socioeconomic status, education, etc. we are more likely to have issues like preeclampsia.

The US medical system is flawed. There are great support staff, nurses and doctors working in a flawed system. Ask anyone whose worked in a hospital about press Ganey (sp?) or other satisfaction surveys. People become jaded and forget they are taking care of real people.

As someone who has been on both sides of the fence, never leave a loved one at the hospital alone. Most US hospitals are understaffed. You may or may not get a person whose heart in is their job. Be the annoying family member that asks questions. “I know you are busy but. ..” that takes medical staff off their guard and reminds them this a person, not a consumer.

Be persistent. If that doesn’t work, be more persistent. If that doesn’t work take it up a notch accordingly. Tell anyone who will listen. Ask for a patient advocate.

I’m not asking for an extra juice or blanket, I’m asking for healthcare.
 

UmSumayyah

Well-Known Member
Ya know Serena Williams said they didn’t want to listen to her when she said something wasn’t right. And she has a history of clotting!

Pregnant black women are at higher risk than other women. Even accounting for higher socioeconomic status, education, etc. we are more likely to have issues like preeclampsia.

The US medical system is flawed. There are great support staff, nurses and doctors working in a flawed system. Ask anyone whose worked in a hospital about press Ganey (sp?) or other satisfaction surveys. People become jaded and forget they are taking care of real people.

As someone who has been on both sides of the fence, never leave a loved one at the hospital alone. Most US hospitals are understaffed. You may or may not get a person whose heart in is their job. Be the annoying family member that asks questions. “I know you are busy but. ..” that takes medical staff off their guard and reminds them this a person, not a consumer.

Be persistent. If that doesn’t work, be more persistent. If that doesn’t work take it up a notch accordingly. Tell anyone who will listen. Ask for a patient advocate.

I’m not asking for an extra juice or blanket, I’m asking for healthcare.
When my mom was in the hospital we showed up in force and let it be known.
 

madamdot

Well-Known Member
I remember this and it broke my heart. It was about a year after I gave birth and totally understand.

Ladies, let me tell you. If your doctor is not advocating for you - leave. I swear this is one of 2 or so jobs that people don’t perform well and we don’t fire them on the spot.

When I pregnant with my son, I changed OB 3 times. The first person was good but she was a nurse practitioner and I was 95% sure I was going to need a c-section. I knew this before I got pregnant but wanted to explore all possibilities. She agreed this was likely the case and that I needed to see an OB who could do that. The NP was lovely and had worked with me through medical another issue. She did my regular woman check up.

Anyway, I ended up with a guy who I could tell didn’t give a $hit. He was older and very matter of fact, which I didn’t like. I need my doctors to talk to me. He had me come in for an appointment. I thought it was a regular prenatal check up but the sonogram tech asked why I was there since this wasn’t a week for a regular check up. The tech went to talk to the doctor who told her what he was looking for. I was LIVID! How dare he not tell me he was concerned about something. I am not a child. I did the sonogram and went and saw someone else. On the recommendation of another mom friend I went to another OB who ended up delivering both my kids.

Let me tell you I was so happy cause things could’ve easily gotten out of hand. For scheduled C-sections you have to go in a few days before and get blood work done. The morning my son was born I checked into the hospital and they asked me my blood type. I told them. They told me that I was wrong. That they had something else on file. I said absolutely not. I know my blood type.

My doctor came in and stopped everything and demanded that they redo the bloodwork and make sure they got the correct information on file before she would do the C-section. She wanted to be 100% sure the information was correct because one of the major things she was worried about was complications from bleeding from fibroids. Basically the same thing that the previous doctor was concerned about but didn’t tell me. I think if I had gone with that guy he would have just accepted the hospital’s information.

To this day almost all my doctors are women and most of them are people of color (black, Indian, Trini). We have to find the people who will fight for us and fire the ones who don’t. This was a hard learned lesson for me. Thankfully not life or death, but years of misdiagnosis.
 

Evolving78

Well-Known Member
I remember this and it broke my heart. It was about a year after I gave birth and totally understand.

Ladies, let me tell you. If your doctor is not advocating for you - leave. I swear this is one of 2 or so jobs that people don’t perform well and we don’t fire them on the spot.

When I pregnant with my son, I changed OB 3 times. The first person was good but she was a nurse practitioner and I was 95% sure I was going to need a c-section. I knew this before I got pregnant but wanted to explore all possibilities. She agreed this was likely the case and that I needed to see an OB who could do that. The NP was lovely and had worked with me through medical another issue. She did my regular woman check up.

Anyway, I ended up with a guy who I could tell didn’t give a $hit. He was older and very matter of fact, which I didn’t like. I need my doctors to talk to me. He had me come in for an appointment. I thought it was a regular prenatal check up but the sonogram tech asked why I was there since this wasn’t a week for a regular check up. The tech went to talk to the doctor who told her what he was looking for. I was LIVID! How dare he not tell me he was concerned about something. I am not a child. I did the sonogram and went and saw someone else. On the recommendation of another mom friend I went to another OB who ended up delivering both my kids.

Let me tell you I was so happy cause things could’ve easily gotten out of hand. For scheduled C-sections you have to go in a few days before and get blood work done. The morning my son was born I checked into the hospital and they asked me my blood type. I told them. They told me that I was wrong. That they had something else on file. I said absolutely not. I know my blood type.

My doctor came in and stopped everything and demanded that they redo the bloodwork and make sure they got the correct information on file before she would do the C-section. She wanted to be 100% sure the information was correct because one of the major things she was worried about was complications from bleeding from fibroids. Basically the same thing that the previous doctor was concerned about but didn’t tell me. I think if I had gone with that guy he would have just accepted the hospital’s information.

To this day almost all my doctors are women and most of them are people of color (black, Indian, Trini). We have to find the people who will fight for us and fire the ones who don’t. This was a hard learned lesson for me. Thankfully not life or death, but years of misdiagnosis.
Black doctors (women) and black healthcare professionals (women) have been extremely problematic, insensitive, and come off highly jaded in my personal experience.
 

Everything Zen

Well-Known Member
Yeah I tried to keep black doctors but it’s not always the case. I love my young Indian PCP. I tried two black doctors before that. One was an older woman who had a great bedside manner but her staff was ghetto and always had her running 2 hours late and were always having me run out of my medications to the point where I threatened to leave the practice. Before that I tried a black male doctor who was treating me for an acute case of bronchitis. The first thing he told me was I was going to have to get rid of my pets. :look: He questioned my birth control pills and told me I didn’t need to drink water after I proudly told him I try to drink a gallon daily. Never went back.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Yeah I tried to keep black doctors but it’s not always the case. I love my young Indian PCP. I tried two black doctors before that. One was an older woman who had a great bedside manner but her staff was ghetto and always had her running 2 hours late and were always having me run out of my medications to the point where I threatened to leave the practice. Before that I tried a black male doctor who was treating me for an acute case of bronchitis. The first thing he told me was I was going to have to get rid of my pets. :look: He questioned my birth control pills and told me I didn’t need to drink water after I proudly told him I try to drink a gallon daily. Never went back.
I have had run-ins with bad black doctors--one who just had bad bedside manner--a Sister who I knew from college. She was in med-school and I was in undergrad in that medical school's tutoring program for those pursuing science degrees. She and I spoke all the time and she was just a little standoffish for no reason. The old white guy who treated me in that same practice for the same thing months later was an absolute dream. The second was a young black guy in the ER when my one year old was sick with high fever and low O2 sats. It was an ear infection and he noted breastfeeding as the cause bc she was 1. I could have ripped him a new one with facts and research but I just gave him a death stare. It was 3 AM and my husband touched my hand cause he knew.


My kids' Ped are white and the back up Pediatrician is middle eastern. They've been great. I love them and I'ma stick beside 'em.

My OB is a sister, an AKA and she is my boo. She got out of bed in the middle of the night to bring my princesses earthside and I have the best memories of her and my black doula shooting the wind, chit chatting after the delivery (my OB patiently teaching, and my doula asking questions like an intern) and my black and latina nurses cooing over my new minutes-old princess and attending to me and husband helping him do skin to skin. Having all that melanin attending me is the best memory ever.

The point is doctors can go either way. Color matters until it doesn't....behaviors are the most important thing. Vibes and attitudes matter.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Black doctors (women) and black healthcare professionals (women) have been extremely problematic, insensitive, and come off highly jaded in my personal experience.
I wish you had my OB. She really is sweet. People literally clear the halls for her, she is so respected and revered. I watched her in action and she easily takes charge but is never mean or disrespectful to staff or patients.
There is a Nigerian OB in town. An older gentleman. People be fighting over him. The white ladies love his bedside manner. They will wait more weeks than they need to be just to be squeezed onto his busy schedule. He let me come right on in when a friend of mine delivered and he was almost like her uncle or grandad. Just as gentle and encouraging her to give breastfeeding a try.
 

Evolving78

Well-Known Member
I wish you had my OB. She really is sweet. People literally clear the halls for her, she is so respected and revered. I watched her in action and she easily takes charge but is never mean or disrespectful to staff or patients.
There is a Nigerian OB in town. An older gentleman. People be fighting over him. The white ladies love his bedside manner. They will wait more weeks than they need to be just to be squeezed onto his busy schedule. He let me come right on in when a friend of mine delivered and he was almost like her uncle or grandad. Just as gentle and encouraging her to give breastfeeding a try.
My second and fourth (found her when I left a non-caring, not doing her job butt OB at 32 weeks) OBs were great, but they left their practices to be SAHMs. My primary is black and is a demon..
 

Jmartjrmd

Well-Known Member
Yessss! We did shift work when my mom was in the hospital. The nurses are overworked. They have few aides to help patients. Her dr trying to dip in and out. Her nurse forgot her meds. She would had to wait for help going to the bathroom. And this was a “good” hospital.
Sadly this is true
I know this is older but the problem is the administration. They choose to run hospitals the way they do. There are plenty of nurses out there but not plenty who are willing to work. I saw a Stat that in the current climate 30 to 40 percent of new grads are leaving the profession all together by year 2! That's sad and troubling.
Nursing should be a wonderful, fulfilling profession and it can be but it also sucks.
Ratios are terrible, conditions are terrible, pay sucks, morale is low, respect is low, bullying is high and Satisfaction surveys are more important than actual patient care.
When I was in undergrad I should of seen the writing on the wall and got OUT. I worked as a cna on a med surg floor. There were two of us cna's and 2 nurses 1 RN and 1LPN for the entire floor. We had 36 patients which mean each nurse had 18 patients! 18! And 1 had 18 and the other cna 18. To make it worse i was only doing 3p to 12p because of school so after 11 my nurse was on her own. This wasn't a nursing home where that's common this was in a hospital. I remember making rounds and finding one patient dead. I got my nurse and yeah that lady had been gone for who knows how long so now my nurse had to stop and deal with the death while trying to manage 17 other patients plus what work the LPN couldn't do.

Most non medical people know hospitals are understaffed but not just how bad it is. 1:4 in the icu ( 2 icu patients should be max some need to be 1,:1) 1:8 on the floor. Patients are sicker than ever with multiple, complex issues.
When ( if) safe Staffing laws are proposed in your area vote for them. It's not perfect but it could help. California has safe Staffing laws, the only state with a real law, but even they are not always perfect. If you followed my story I was in Cali at the time of my HA and the care I received initially was subpar.
I did have to do a lot of telling them what I wanted done when I was finally awake but Thank God my sister and my husband both were around and both medically trained.
My nephew could of been saved had Doctors listened to my sister but he loss his life to lack of care at just 19 years old.
Sigh
I love my job working with babies but even in baby world there are hospitals that do 1:5 and when understaffed 1:6 or 1:7...nobody can give competent care trying to do total care on 7 sick babies.
When does nurse get to eat, break, pee. It can take 1.5 to 2 hours to properly assess, feed monitor 3 how the heck can you do 7? Cutting corners is the only way and dangerous.
It's tough out there and only going to get MUCH worse.
 

Evolving78

Well-Known Member
@Jmartjrmd
The hospital where I had my first baby wasn’t understaffed. They had poor performance issues that led to a quality improvement initiative which got the nurses and the rest of the clinical team on track. They also implemented a survey given to patients for each nurse they came into contact with and displayed the chart in the hallway showing nurses where they fall in the metrics. When I had my 3rd baby there, The nursing staff provided quality care, therefore leading to better patient outcomes. At the time the hospital was also in transition of merging with a healthcare organization that could easily replace staff. There is a catch 22 when healthcare facilites and other organizations that serve the black community or an underserved population are managed by a black administration.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Sadly this is true
I know this is older but the problem is the administration. They choose to run hospitals the way they do. There are plenty of nurses out there but not plenty who are willing to work. I saw a Stat that in the current climate 30 to 40 percent of new grads are leaving the profession all together by year 2! That's sad and troubling.
Nursing should be a wonderful, fulfilling profession and it can be but it also sucks.
Ratios are terrible, conditions are terrible, pay sucks, morale is low, respect is low, bullying is high and Satisfaction surveys are more important than actual patient care.
When I was in undergrad I should of seen the writing on the wall and got OUT. I worked as a cna on a med surg floor. There were two of us cna's and 2 nurses 1 RN and 1LPN for the entire floor. We had 36 patients which mean each nurse had 18 patients! 18! And 1 had 18 and the other cna 18. To make it worse i was only doing 3p to 12p because of school so after 11 my nurse was on her own. This wasn't a nursing home where that's common this was in a hospital. I remember making rounds and finding one patient dead. I got my nurse and yeah that lady had been gone for who knows how long so now my nurse had to stop and deal with the death while trying to manage 17 other patients plus what work the LPN couldn't do.

Most non medical people know hospitals are understaffed but not just how bad it is. 1:4 in the icu ( 2 icu patients should be max some need to be 1,:1) 1:8 on the floor. Patients are sicker than ever with multiple, complex issues.
When ( if) safe Staffing laws are proposed in your area vote for them. It's not perfect but it could help. California has safe Staffing laws, the only state with a real law, but even they are not always perfect. If you followed my story I was in Cali at the time of my HA and the care I received initially was subpar.
I did have to do a lot of telling them what I wanted done when I was finally awake but Thank God my sister and my husband both were around and both medically trained.
My nephew could of been saved had Doctors listened to my sister but he loss his life to lack of care at just 19 years old.
Sigh
I love my job working with babies but even in baby world there are hospitals that do 1:5 and when understaffed 1:6 or 1:7...nobody can give competent care trying to do total care on 7 sick babies.
When does nurse get to eat, break, pee. It can take 1.5 to 2 hours to properly assess, feed monitor 3 how the heck can you do 7? Cutting corners is the only way and dangerous.
It's tough out there and only going to get MUCH worse.
I wanted to let you know Starting May 5th I'll be working in the hospital. I'll be working with very sick children, infants, women. So you know I will be taking my fight over there!
 

Jmartjrmd

Well-Known Member
@Jmartjrmd
The hospital where I had my first baby wasn’t understaffed. They had poor performance issues that led to a quality improvement initiative which got the nurses and the rest of the clinical team on track. They also implemented a survey given to patients for each nurse they came into contact with and displayed the chart in the hallway showing nurses where they fall in the metrics. When I had my 3rd baby there, The nursing staff provided quality care, therefore leading to better patient outcomes. At the time the hospital was also in transition of merging with a healthcare organization that could easily replace staff. There is a catch 22 when healthcare facilites and other organizations that serve the black community or an underserved population are managed by a black administration.
I'm happy you had a better experience!
I know satisfaction scores are tied to reimbursement and the ability of the hospital to get and retain new and old patients. They make $$$ when you come back and tell your friends and family you had a good experience so then they go too. Especially in larger cities people have choices so what they say about xyz hospital matters. But still there are some really scary places out there where the people that can make a difference are more worried about appearances and their bonuses than providing good care and the basics of what people need to do their job. Covid stripped a lot of these places naked so people could finally see the truth. Not much has changed.
In my experience administration doesn't care until it affects profit. I learned that as a manager when we were severely understaffed and had to provide less than stellar care and my patient population can't handle that. I can only really speak to the pedi and NICU units and what I saw around the country and the whole point of my job was to go to where Staffing was an issue. Poor staffing directly affects quality care. And usually the answer isn't lets find another nurse it's lets add those patients to a nurse that already has a full assignment. Then admissions come and she gets yet another patient.
Patients get sicker during your shift which means the nurse needs more time to care for that patient but they are already short so who can help her and steer the ship or throw her a life jacket as she's drowning. Can't provide quality care that way. It's a domino effect.
I could talk all day about healthcare politics and administration and staffing what drives them to do better. It's Benjamin or some major lawsuit etc....see what just went on at Vanderbilt.
And nurses get blamed for everything. But we also don't speak up for ourselves.
Healthcare is a mess and I'm scared for myself everytime I have to go in and these are my peers and colleagues.
If I knew then what I know now I wouldn't advise anyone to go into nursing specifically and like I said I love what I do but I wouldn't chose it again if I had a do over.
 

Jmartjrmd

Well-Known Member
I wanted to let you know Starting May 5th I'll be working in the hospital. I'll be working with very sick children, infants, women. So you know I will be taking my fight over there!
Yes! I know you'll fight for what's right! Every aspect of healthcare needs to speak up and change our system.

I know there's a million nurses march planned but I'm not sure about how organized it is currently but they still plan to go through with it. Actually there are 2.
 
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