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Moisture vs. Protein Conditioners (shampoos too)

Lucia

Well-Known Member
Just posting this so we can keep on top of our moisture/protein balance.

You can apply these ingredients to shampoos too, (if you use shampoo) there are protein and moisturizing ones but beware of SLS, cause they can cause severe dryness even if you're using a moisturizing shampoo and conditioner.

Moisture

source: http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/313072/how_to_select_a_moisturizing_conditioner.html?cat=69

For the best moisturizing result, your weekly conditioners should always be super moisturizing. Protein-based deep conditioners should only be used as the hair dictates. Please see my moisture/protein balancing article for more information. You may find that you can go quite a while without protein deep conditioning, and that is okay! Keep in mind that many moisturizing deep conditioners also contain some protein. Wheat and silk proteins are the most common gentle proteins in moisturizing deep conditioners. They tend to be extremely gentle and actually enhance the hair's elasticity by helping moisture bind within the cuticle. So, if you see this kind of protein in your moisturizing deep conditioner don't fret! You're still okay moisture wise!

So what should you be looking for in a moisturizing deep conditioner?
1.) Fat
When looking at moisturizing deep conditioners, you really want a conditioner with lots of "fat" in it! Okay, what do I mean by fat? You need a moisturizing deep conditioner that contains lots of fatty alcohols. Fatty alcohols are "hair friendly" alcohols, unlike the alcohols found in finishing sprays which are often drying to the hair. Common fatty alcohols include substances like cetyl alcohol, cetearyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and myristyl alcohol.

2.) Humectants, Emollients, and Conditioning Agents

Humectants are substances that draw moisture from the surrounding air to the hair! Common humectants, emollients, and conditioning agents you want in your moisturizing deep conditioner are propylene glycol, sodium lactate, sodium PCA, hydantoin, glycerin, polyquarternium, glyceryl stearate, centrimonium chloride, and other natural waxes and oils.

3.) Silicones (If you or your hair hates cones avoid the cones)
You also want a moisturizing deep conditioner formula with a few silicone ingredients, or "cones." Silicones have gotten a bad reputation in many healthy hair care circles as scalp clogging, hair coating, moisture defeaters. However, all "cones" are not bad and many are quite useful. "Cones" actually help with your ability to effectively detangle your wet hair. Much of the sleekness and softness we get from rinsing out our conditioners is thanks to those pesky "cones"! Now if you are conditioner-washing the hair regularly (or washing the hair without shampoo), you don't really want to deal with "cones" too much. Silicones will build up on the hair without your shampoo's surfactants there to assist with removal. If your moisturizing deep conditioner is silicone heavy, you should consider clarifying the hair at least once or twice per month.


Proteins

source: http://eternalvoyageur.xanga.com/688633302/how-to-tell-if-a-conditioner-has-protein-in-it-/

Here's some ingredients that will ID your conditioner as a protein conditioner, even if it's not Aphogee there are alot of light protein conditioners out there. Once you ID them then you'll understand why your hairs a little hard afterwards, unless you know to follow it up with a moisturizing conditioner. Another hint if it says repair or strengthening it's a protein. These ingredients are in protein shampoos too, so read your labels.

For those who didn't notice FYI: V05 moisture milks has soy milk protein in it, the extra body has collagen in it-so I classify them as light proteins cause they still have some moisture fats in them. Another simple way to tell is little to no slip even after rinsing really well.

These are the key words to look for= Protein ingredients:

Amino acids
Silk
Wheat
Hydrolized
Milk
Egg
Keratin
Collagen
 

bklyncurly

New Member
Thanks for the thread! I'm dealing with cottony hair with no curl definition in the front since I started working out daily and con-washing daily. So, I'm just rinsing my hair after a workout and hoping for the best. My hair looks good after clarifying, protein tx, and deep con, but I don't know if I should do this weekly. Too damaging? I'm thinking more protein, but not sure what to do. :nono:
 

ms.blue

Well-Known Member
I use to clarify my hair every week but that was b/c I was using heavy products on my hair now it's once in awhile when I feel like it. Also w/ the protein, if you don't use heat every week, there is no reason to do a protein treatment. I say do a moisturizing dc every week and do a protein treatment once or twice a month, if you feel your hair turning mushy.
 

bklyncurly

New Member
I use to clarify my hair every week but that was b/c I was using heavy products on my hair now it's once in awhile when I feel like it. Also w/ the protein, if you don't use heat every week, there is no reason to do a protein treatment. I say do a moisturizing dc every week and do a protein treatment once or twice a month, if you feel your hair turning mushy.

Sounds good. I did a quick protein tx this am after my workout (2 min Aphogee Keratin tx) and my hair does look and feel a little better. I'll do the moisturizing dc this weekend. Thanks!
 
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