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Over-the-counter Medicine Cannot Kill Super Lice

creolebombshell

Well-Known Member
The reason bp dont usually get it is because we put product in our hair. Lice dont like things like leave ins, grease, or Shea butter, gel or evoo. Lol.

My dd caught it from school last year because I neglected to put extra product in her hair. Imagine the hours combing those bastards out of waist length curly hair :nono:

And its not just the hair. You got to continuously sterilize everything : bed linens, toys, towels. Stuffed animals have to be secured away in plastic bags to starve them out for a cpl weeks. Annoying af!

I dont forget now. She gets some leave in AND gel AND oil throughout the week. Lol.
That is the truth right there . I remember when taking my youngest to the dermatologist for her ecezma and discussing with the dr, a white man, what I could do to make sure my kids didn't get lice. He explained that the product we put in our hair tend to make our hair resistant to getting lice. He finished it off as whatever we are doing just keep on doing.......I was obsessed with not getting lice so much that when my kids were in pre k and elementary I wouldn't let them in my room or on my bed till the end of the school week when I washed their hair. It got to a point where my oldest said there was a girl in her class who had lice and she didn't tell me till years later because I was so annoying with it:badgirl:
 

Weezy Jefferson

Lil' Mama apologist
From what I've read about head lice, it doesn't have anything to do with cleanliness or products used, but rather that the claws of the type of louse most common in the US are more adapted to grip the shaft of straight/straighter hair than kinkier hair.

From the CDC:
"In the United States, infestation with head lice is much less common among African-Americans than among persons of other races, possibly because the claws of the of the head louse found most frequently in the United States are better adapted for grasping the shape and width of the hair shaft of other races."

From UC Davis:
"Head lice found in the United States prefer hair that is round in cross section. Hair that is ovoid in cross section, such as the extremely curly hair of African Americans, is not as attractive to lice that are adapted to round hair shafts. While head lice infestations are common in Africa, as in all continents, African head lice have claws especially adapted for grasping oval hair shafts. The African variety of head lice is not common in North America and consequently African Americans are much less susceptible to infestations, but they can get head lice."

And a director of a medical entymology center says this about the common belief that lice prefer clean hair:
"The clean-hair myth was created in the 1970s to convince middle-class parents that it was not an issue only associated with poorer children."

Apparently in the 50s-70s, the public associated lice with poor, dirty children who were neglected by their parents. The classist aspect is pretty interesting, actually. Dirty, shameful, indicative of bad parenting and upbringing when "they" get it. But an unwelcome annoyance now that it's something for "everyone," with "everyone" being middle/upper middle-class whites. Imagine how they would frame it if the type of lice adapted to African hair were most common in the US and not the type adapted to straight hair.

Looking this up and seeing pictures is making me itch. :lol:
 
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PuddingPop

Well-Known Member
Yes. I had a black patient who's hair was infested with them to the point where you could see them moving in her head if you stood several feet away. She was severely mentally ill and had bad pneumonia. We had to sedate her because she refused to let us shave her hair off but we had no choice.
No Ma'am! . That would be the day I would consider surrendering my license. I can not even imagine.
 

brg240

Well-Known Member
How do lice fair worth relaxers bc I'd just try that tbh

Hmm but I see that would just make it attractive to lice

Well w/e this literally no worry of mine
 

luckiestdestiny

Well-Known Member
Yes. I had a black patient who's hair was infested with them to the point where you could see them moving in her head if you stood several feet away. She was severely mentally ill and had bad pneumonia. We had to sedate her because she refused to let us shave her hair off but we had no choice.
wait a minute. You had a choice. Shave her head? Why not just treat it?
 

BillsBackerz67

Well-Known Member
wait a minute. You had a choice. Shave her head? Why not just treat it?
No there was not a choice. If you are not aggressive you expose other patients and staff taking care of her. There was no treating that. It needed to be shaved off. It's like asking why not spray Raid when ur home is infested with millions of roaches. Raid ain't cutting it. Her scalp had deep sores, bite marks, and puss seeping out after all her hair was removed.
 

luckiestdestiny

Well-Known Member
No there was not a choice. If you are not aggressive you expose other patients and staff taking care of her. There was no treating that. It needed to be shaved off. It's like asking why not spray Raid when ur home is infested with millions of roaches. Raid ain't cutting it. Her scalp had deep sores, bite marks, and puss seeping out after all her hair was removed.
EWWW . Okay then :look:
 

LeftRightRepeat

Well-Known Member
You sure this applies to tightly coiled hair too? I can barely get a comb through my hair on a good day and I have like 100% shrinkage. I don't see how lice can climb it. :lol:
I grew up in a majority black country and from time to time there would be lice outbreaks. Maybe the lice had no choice as there's not a whole lot of straight hair to choose from...but i guarantee that the majority of the kids were type 4 of some sort.

Maybe in the US because they have more type 1,2 and 3 hair to choose from, the type 4s won't get it as easily.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
Between a hot comb and relaxer, you would think that lice ain't got a chance. It seems like natural hair would put you more at risk.

I knew from a previous thread that white folks lice couldn't hold on to type 4 hair. I get a mental picture of some random lice bug getting lost in type 4 hair looking around like this:

 

Sosa

Well-Known Member
My y-boss just got called to her daughter's school to pick her up cuz she has lice.:perplexed:
I have a meeting with my boss tomorrow. Can these things jump? Am I good as long as I don't come in close contact with boss?
 

meka72

Well-Known Member
I usually like when you provide real world examples. Not this time though. Lol.

No there was not a choice. If you are not aggressive you expose other patients and staff taking care of her. There was no treating that. It needed to be shaved off. It's like asking why not spray Raid when ur home is infested with millions of roaches. Raid ain't cutting it. Her scalp had deep sores, bite marks, and puss seeping out after all her hair was removed.
 

Autumn~Tint~Of~Gold

Rocking the Casbah
I got lice in elementary school and I had dirty hair. It wasn't washed much because I feared the water getting on my face. It sent me into hysterics when it happened.
I recall this girl named Julieth lol who sat near of me had a lot of white bits in her hair. I always though I got it from her and that maybe those white bits were nits :barf:. I remember being paranoid that she somehow deliberately gave me lice. She was kind of disturbed as I recall. She was overweight and I was underweight and she called me fat lol.
Anyway, the itching was so bad I remember crying about it one day :lol:
And even after thorough combing with RIT you'll never get every last nit out. They're attached to the hair shafts with some kind of glue :shudders:
My brother got the lice from me and he has much curlier hair than I do.
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
Mutant 'Super Lice' Outbreak Has Now Spread to Nearly Every State



Mutant 'Super Lice' Outbreak Has Now Spread to Nearly Every State


Country Living
August 4, 2016



From Country Living

Back to school season is upon us, which means it’s time for new school supplies, first day of school pictures, and that dreaded four-letter word: lice. But this year, it’s not just exposure to regular lice that parents have to worry about: There’s now a treatment resistant “super lice” that’s spreading across the United States.

A whopping 42 out of 48 states tested are overrun by this so-called super lice, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology. In these 42 states, according to NBC’s Today show, 100 percent of the lice tested were resistant to over-the-counter treatments.

In six other states - New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Oregon, New Mexico, and North Dakota - some, but not all, the lice tested were resistant to over-the-counter treatments.

Alaska and West Virginia were not part of the study.


The problem, according to the Today show, is that lice have mutated, making it more difficult for the chemicals in over-the-counter treatments to lock on to the lice and eliminate it.

Last August, a study made waves when it found that at least 25 states had developed treatment resistant lice. Kyong Sup Yoon, Ph.D., who worked on that study and this latest one, suggests that the only way to effectively treat these lice are with different chemicals, ones that are typically available through a prescription.

“If you use a chemical over and over, these little creatures will eventually develop resistance,” Yoon said last year. “So we have to think before we use a treatment. The good news is head lice don’t carry disease. They’re more a nuisance than anything else.”

Dr. Robin Gehris, the chief of pediatric dermatology at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburg, told Today that if your child has head lice, it is more likely resistance lice than not. Gheris recommends that parents try to get rid of the infection by using over-the-counter treatment twice.

“Treat the entire head and leave it on for a few hours and then repeat a week later,” she told Today. “If you still see things moving after the second treatment it’s time to call the doctor.”

There are countless home remedies to treat lice, including putting mayonnaise, olive oil, and lotion on the scalp, but Dr. Gehris cannot guarantee their effectiveness.

To parents gearing up to send their kids back to school, keep the suggested plan of action in mind: use over the counter treatment twice, and if the problem persists, pay a visit to your doctor for a prescription treatment.
 

sharifeh

Well-Known Member
Yeah I thought it was our hair texture that made us less likely to get lice not products

Maybe the lice in the US is more adapted to straight hair
I wonder if lice in a Black Country would be adapted to our hair ? Hmm
 
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