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Planning To Use Hot Comb...

gabulldawg

Well-Known Member
I am currently texlaxed with overprocessed ends. Ever since I've become more texlaxed and less overprocessed I have been really having a hard time straightening my hair! :wallbash: I have been straightening with a flat iron. Either it will stay straight until I step out of the house, or it won't even pretend to get straight!

I really have been missing the straight look, SO, I thought about how when I was younger my mother would use the trusted hot comb and it would keep my hair relatively straight for about a week. I went to the BSS and bought an electric hot comb that you can adjust the tempterature on. I am planning on trying to use the hotcomb to straigthen my hair tonight or tomorrow morning.

Does anyone have any tips? My plan now is to go home and DC for about 30 minutes and then blow-dry in sections until completely dry and then flat iron in sections. TIA!
 

Zenobia61

Member
Hey, GD..is it your NG that won't get straight or all of your length? I used to hot comb my new growth in between relaxers with no probs, but I would be scurred to straighten your texlaxed length with a hot comb unless you do it on a very low temperature and really baby your hair before and after...
 

LushLox

Well-Known Member
I remember trying to hot comb my lengths back in the day, I was almost in shock when my hair started to break right before me - I never tried it again!!

It will fry your ends!
 

Cloud06

New Member
A good heat protectant and DC will help. Although I wouldn't press the ends (Overprocessed part.) And use a low to medium heat. It all depends on how your hair responds to heat. Some peoples hair love heat and others hair hates it, so proceed with caution and use good judgment. I would start off with a little heat, meaning just press and pincurl, no flat-iron afterwards, then maybe next time increase to find a balance. Have you pressed before?

It'd be best to start with 1 inch sections start at the root pull the comb down close to scalp without burning yourself, making sure the bar part to the comb reaches the roots then slowly but steadily drag it thru and take it out just before you reach the overprocessed ends. When I pressed I would not blowdry but then I found I broke more hair at the line of demarcation. So make sure hair is well detangled from root to tip. Since if you use low heat going slow won't do much but straighten better. Don't use grease or heavy product unless you are natural or have thick hair and don't press before it's time for a touch up or right after a touch up.

Have you ever thought about a corrector relaxer? Re-relaxing the underprocessed hair?
 

gabulldawg

Well-Known Member
A good heat protectant and DC will help. Although I wouldn't press the ends (Overprocessed part.) And use a low to medium heat. It all depends on how your hair responds to heat. Some peoples hair love heat and others hair hates it, so proceed with caution and use good judgment. I would start off with a little heat, meaning just press and pincurl, no flat-iron afterwards, then maybe next time increase to find a balance. Have you pressed before?

It'd be best to start with 1 inch sections start at the root pull the comb down close to scalp without burning yourself, making sure the bar part to the comb reaches the roots then slowly but steadily drag it thru and take it out just before you reach the overprocessed ends. When I pressed I would not blowdry but then I found I broke more hair at the line of demarcation. So make sure hair is well detangled from root to tip. Since if you use low heat going slow won't do much but straighten better. Don't use grease or heavy product unless you are natural or have thick hair and don't press before it's time for a touch up or right after a touch up.

Have you ever thought about a corrector relaxer? Re-relaxing the underprocessed hair?

I actually haven't thought of that. I'm a little frightened of it actually. I am trying my best to have healthy hair. My hair was overprocessed for so long that I know I don't want to go back there. The only thing I miss about overprocessed hair was how straight it would get with minimal heat. :ohwell: Is a corrector something I can ask my stylist to do?
 
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