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Protein treatments for overprocessed hair?

luvmesumhair

Well-Known Member
I think I may be overprocessed. In order for my hair to get back in shape do you think it is wise to give it protein treatments? Would'nt the protein make the hair drier and harder? Should'nt I concentrate on moisturizing conditioners?

After washing out the perm, A LOT OF HAIR WAS COMING OUT and it seems that my hair does not have a lot of elasticity (sp?) in it too. I am scared. I tried to do a corrective over my UNDERprocessed part and it did not ever get straighter. I am depressed. (you can check it out here...http://public.fotki.com/luvmesumhair/cathy-howse-method/2008/april/)

Yes my hair is breaking too. Anyone of you had overprocessed hair and was able to nurse it back to health? I am going to log off right now because I am about to go home but please do leave me some encouragement and so forth. I will try and log on tonight or tomorrow to read your responses and reply as well.

Thanks.
 

nomoweavesfome

Active Member
when mine was overprocessed, I was not able to nurse it back to it's original state of health, however protein helped in maintaining it's strength while growing. Unfortunately, with overprocessed hair, breakage will come. You will have to work extra hard as well, making sure you deep condition like all the time. Less manipulation as possible too.

I'm sorry ma. You will be fine tho.
 

luvmesumhair

Well-Known Member
when mine was overprocessed, I was not able to nurse it back to it's original state of health, however protein helped in maintaining it's strength while growing. Unfortunately, with overprocessed hair, breakage will come. You will have to work extra hard as well, making sure you deep condition like all the time. Less manipulation as possible too.

I'm sorry ma. You will be fine tho.
Thanks for responding.

Anyone else?
 
I'm so sorry that happened to you baby girl :nono:. I am sorry that I'm not qualified to give you proper advice but here's a :grouphug:. Bump
 

honeybadgirl

New Member
so so sorry that happened:sad:
i would think you would need to do moisturizing conditioners. maybe a few times a week. maybe others will come in and confirm and help you out
 

DaRealist

New Member
I suspect my hair is overprocessed too so I did a search and found the following tips.
The last time I know my hair was overprocessed was almost 10 years ago and I did nurse it back by staying away from all forms of heat, except when I DC'd. I would let my hair airdry and then wear it twisted back like cornrows. I also DC'd twice a week during that time.
Anyway, here are the tips I found
It isn’t hard to end up with over-processed [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]hair[/FONT][/FONT]. If you have permed, relaxed, dyed or bleached, and/or heat-styled your hair repeatedly then your hair might fall into this category. Here’s how to tell if your hair is damaged from over-processing:

Over-processed hair…
is dry at the ends
has split ends is coarse after processing but it hasn’t always been that texture
has lots of rebellious fly-away or frizzy strands

If your hair meets any one or more of these four standards, your hair is probably over-processed. If it is, follow these simple steps toward easy recovery.

1) Don’t use a harsh shampoo and [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]conditioner[/FONT][/FONT]. If your shampoo says on its label that it is for “oily hair” then you need a new [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]shampoo[/FONT][/FONT]. Don’t use products that are meant to strip your hair of its naturally occurring oils. Opt for a gentler, more nourishing shampoo and an intense moisturizing conditioner.
2) Because over-processed, chemically treated, dried out hair needs extra moisturization to stay healthy, start using a leave-in conditioner immediately. Leave-in conditioners are formulated to be light enough that they can be applied to hair everyday without giving a greasy look or feel to your hair, but they are just heavy enough to keep those dried ends and fly-away strands in check. Apply a [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]leave [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]in [/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]conditioner[/FONT][/FONT] to hair only after it has been shampooed and conditioned in the shower, and then towel dried. Leave-in conditioners can be found in [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]salons[/FONT][/FONT] and drug and grocery stores under just about every known label.
3) Deep condition your hair one time per week. Most people should do this anyway but if your hair is damaged it is particularly important that you don’t skip over this step. Remember that you need to do more than the minimum to keep your hair as healthy as those who don’t over-process. Deep conditioning products come in many forms, from thick mud masks for the hair, to oil treatments, to rich moisturizing conditioning creams that contain vitamins and [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]essential [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]oils[/FONT][/FONT]. Plan to leave the conditioner in for at least 5 minutes before rinsing it out for maximum effect, although you should read the label of the product you choose to find out specific instructions from the manufacturer.
4) Ease up on the harsh treatment you are giving your hair. If you want to dye your hair, go darker instead of lighter to avoid excessive bleaching. If you don’t know what color to use, talk to a stylist to get advice. If heat-styling is the main source of your hair’s problems, then it is time to cut back in a major way, but many people don’t know any other way to style their hair. If this is the case, again, consult a stylist for advice, tips, and product recommendations. Another option is to apply products, let your hair air-dry, and then find creative ways to pull it back. Experiment with the boring pony-tail or bun to come up with a few new looks.
5) Get your [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]hair [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]cut[/FONT][/FONT] every two months. Usually, split and dry ends start popping up more often after this point at a rapid pace and you will soon find that your hair just doesn’t look as good as it did after you first got it cut. When this happens, or even before it has a chance to happen, make an appointment with your stylist to get a trim.

Found Here



HTH
 
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DaRealist

New Member
Here's another article I found:

Article on How to Revive Overprocessed hair

Whether it was a bad dye job at home, heavy use of a curling iron, or too many products, overprocessed [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]hair[/FONT][/FONT] can happen to the best of us. No matter how bad the damage is, don’t go [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]hat[/FONT][/FONT] shopping just yet. A few small changes in your daily routine can help revive your dry, fragile tresses and maintain a healthy head for years to come.

Most people wash their hair far too often, not realizing that lathering up daily strips hair of its [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]essential [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]oils[/FONT][/FONT]. Frequent washings are even more harmful for overprocessed hair; since it is so brittle and dry, your hair needs those naturally conditioning oils more than ever. The solution is simple: lay off the [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]shampoo[/FONT][/FONT]. Limit your hair washings to a couple times a week, or every other day at the most. If you must shower daily, simply rinse your hair and work in a small amount of [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]conditioner[/FONT][/FONT].

After you have finished washing your hair, towel dry it thoroughly but carefully. Remember, those fragile tresses need to be handled as gently as possible. Blot your hair instead of rubbing it. It may take a little bit longer, but the result is well worth the extra effort.
There are a few other things you can do while that will help bring your locks back to life. First of all, you can purchase a showerhead with a built-in water filter. (And you thought filtered water was just for drinking!) Chlorine is often added to municipal water supplies as a purifying agent, but it can wreak havoc on hair that is already dry. These special showerheads, easily found in most hardware stores, will filter out the chlorine, and best of all you can install it yourself.

While you are at the hardware store, you might consider picking up a humidifier if you don’t already have one. Running it in your bedroom at night will help lock in the moisture that your [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]dry [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]hair[/FONT][/FONT] desperately desires.

Traumatized hair requires special care during styling. Appliances like hairdryers and [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]curling [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]irons[/FONT][/FONT] can easily damage a healthy head of hair, but pose an even greater threat to locks that have recently been overprocessed. When your hair is damaged, it is best to avoid heat styling altogether. If this is not a possibility, then use these appliances sparingly. Air-dry your hair if you have time. If you don’t, buy a styling product designed to protect hair from heat and work it through your hair thoroughly before you begin drying. Whenever you use a curling iron, make sure that your hair is bone dry before you begin styling. Low heat settings are always best.

Finally, you might consider trying a special conditioning treatment. There are plenty of [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]intensive [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]conditioners[/FONT][/FONT] available in the drug store and at the salon; buy a heavy daily conditioner, as well as a leave-on treatment that you can use every three or four days. If you’re on a tight budget, plain old olive oil is a cheap and highly effective conditioner. Comb a small amount through your hair and leave it on for a few hours (or even overnight). You may have to spend a little extra time washing it out.

Once you’ve nursed your overprocessed hair back to health, be sure to get regular trims (every eight to twelve weeks) to keep your dead ends under control. While you’re at the [FONT=verdana,sans-serif][FONT=verdana,sans-serif]salon[/FONT][/FONT], consult your stylist for even more tips for keeping your hair happy.
Found HERE
 

DaRealist

New Member
Based on these two articles, it seems that protein is the wrong way to go and you should be focusing more on adding moisture back to the hair. I am going to follow these steps because in looking at what constitutes overprocessed hair, mine surely is. :ohwell:
 

luvmesumhair

Well-Known Member
Based on these two articles, it seems that protein is the wrong way to go and you should be focusing more on adding moisture back to the hair. I am going to follow these steps because in looking at what constitutes overprocessed hair, mine surely is. :ohwell:
Thanks for the advice! Well last night I pooed with baking soda (to get the build up off for a really good dc. My hair came out really clean and SOFT!!!) and then dc'd with Aphogee 2 min then hopped back into the shower and rinse out and put in the Nexxus Keraphix and let that sit while I showered then rinsed. Afterwards, while I was letting it air dry, I put some coconut oil on my hair then when it was about 80-85% dry, I started detangleing my hair and put more coconut oil on. My hair turned out fabulous! I did not use anything but coconut oil! Not a lot of hair came out this time either!!!:grin: I will be doing this twice a week. My hair still needs to ger stronger but I can really tell you that it feels a lot different from this weekend!:yep:
 

DaRealist

New Member
This is so funny that you used nothing but coconut oil, because I did the exact same thing yesterday. Great minds... :yep:
I slept in a conditioner from Tuesday to Wednesday and then I rinsed that out in the morning.
I let my hair airdry in braids with nothing but coconut oil too.
I plan to do this once a week and maybe add a little coconut oil to my hair when I rollerset
 

miami74

New Member
Thanks for the advice! Well last night I pooed with baking soda (to get the build up off for a really good dc. My hair came out really clean and SOFT!!!) and then dc'd with Aphogee 2 min then hopped back into the shower and rinse out and put in the Nexxus Keraphix and let that sit while I showered then rinsed. Afterwards, while I was letting it air dry, I put some coconut oil on my hair then when it was about 80-85% dry, I started detangleing my hair and put more coconut oil on. My hair turned out fabulous! I did not use anything but coconut oil! Not a lot of hair came out this time either!!!:grin: I will be doing this twice a week. My hair still needs to ger stronger but I can really tell you that it feels a lot different from this weekend!:yep:

I'm glad to hear that worked for you. When my hair was breaking a lot (due to overprocessing from relaxing every 5 to 6 weeks), I was able to stop the breakage once I started alternating each wash with a mild/light protein DC and a moisture DC. I did the protein treatments as a prepoo and always followed up with a moisturizing DC. HTH.
 

nomoweavesfome

Active Member
Based on these two articles, it seems that protein is the wrong way to go and you should be focusing more on adding moisture back to the hair. I am going to follow these steps because in looking at what constitutes overprocessed hair, mine surely is. :ohwell:

I agree with the use of coconut oil to assist in correcting overprocessed hair because after all coconut oils is part of the fatty acid family and in fact fatty acids has a "high affinity for hair proteins and, because of its low molecular weight and straight linear chain, is able to penetrate inside the hair shaft" , however I beg to differ on no protein at all.
When relaxing hair or with any chemicals for that manner, the hair protein bonds are broken down. Using protien will assist in keeping the hair strengthened although overusage can make hair brittle and break therefore a balance will need to be enforced along with moisture. The opposite end of that is if you overmoisture the hair will be gummy and mushy. If there was no need for protein, then why are there so many products out there geared toward damaged overprocessed hair that are loaded with protein?

I believe like I said and in fact I know because I have been down this road that working hard at MOISTURIZING, DEEP CONDITIONING, PROTEIN, LOW MANIPULATION, NO HEAT WILL ALL CONTRIBUTE TO MAINTAINING HAIR ON YOUR HEAD WITH LESS BREAKAGE.
 

DaRealist

New Member
I agree that protein should still be included in ones regimen if their hair is overprocessed, but not overly so as overprocessed hair needs moisture to help combat the brittleness.

My regimen includes a light protein weekly (aphogee 2 min recon), but I have stepped up my moisturizing products to combat that dry and brittle feel of my overprocessed hair.
 
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