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Texturizer vs. Texlaxing

NOLA2NY

New Member
Can anyone tell me the difference between a texturizer and texlaxing. Pros and Cons. I am currently relaxed bone straight and I am contemplating a change. I'm in my 10th week of stretching. I'm trying to hold out until week 13. When that time approaches I want to have a plan of action. I'm open to any advice. Sorry if this is a repeat.:(
 

peacelove

Active Member
I think it is basically just the level of relaxing that you do to the hair. Texlaxing is one step down from relaxer, and texturizer one step down from texlaxing.

So it really just depends on the amount of curl you want to keep in your hair and then finding the right combination of product and application that gets you those results. I do think that your natural curl pattern sometimes plays a part in the choice. I get what could be considered "texlaxed" - I use Designer Touch texturizing relaxer, which leaves some of my curl pattern but still gets my hair straight with roller sets. I have parts of my hair in the front that have very little curl pattern and more of a "z" pattern. I have parts in the middle and back that have a very strong curl "s" pattern. When I get a relaxer, I get a looser curl/wave pattern in the middle and back, but the front can tend to just be frizzy. In other words, my front areas are better off all natural or bone straight. I find the in between is not ideal for that part of my hair. But since my hair is fine, I prefer using a milder relaxer, which is why I switched from Affirm.

So I would say base it on how fine your hair is, the curl pattern you want to acheive and pick your products and methods from there. :)
 

lonei

Well-Known Member
I have texlaxed hair, Peacelove describes this well. Mine is basically frizzy when wet, I would say underprocessed. Without the right products and tools I cant wear it straight. If you like straight styles, then maybe its not for you.
 

Legend

Trichological Alchemist
lonei said:
I have texlaxed hair, Peacelove describes this well. Mine is basically frizzy when wet, I would say underprocessed. Without the right products and tools I cant wear it straight. If you like straight styles, then maybe its not for you.
ITA. Underprocessed is a good term for texlaxing. Texturizers leaves more curl and/or waves in your hair. The boon is you can stretch much longer between touch-ups (many months) when you texlax or texturize.
 

NOLA2NY

New Member
Ladies thanks for the feedback. Lonei, can you wash and go with you texlax? I'm looking for versatility.
 

Amarech

New Member
I would have to disagree with the whole 'underprocessed ' term.

For all of 2005 I self texlaxed my hair. I could do the whole curly to straight thing and I had curls when wet, but it was obvious my hair was underprocessed.

When my hair dried it would be just like one of the posters described above: frizzy. I had good curl definition but after a month you really couldn't tell that I had a texlaxer. It was really dry and my last relaxer of 2005 reverted after 3 weeks!

This time around I took my time and let the relaxer do its thang and now I really have texlaxed hair.

The curl definition is awesome! My hair hangs and swings curly even when its dry and there is no frizz!!!
 

lonei

Well-Known Member
keishanell said:
Ladies thanks for the feedback. Lonei, can you wash and go with you texlax? I'm looking for versatility.
Yeah if I want to look a hot mess!! I wish I had that versatility but my hair just kind of swells and poofs if I try to wash and go.
 

Sistaslick

New Member
peacelove described it well. The one con is that my texlaxed hair is much harder to straighten and keep straight than when my has relaxed bone straight. Its good for me though, since I don't wear my hair straight very often.

My hair is fine stranded as well, so leaving a bit of the texture behind gives me fullness I would not otherwise have. Since I've been doing it for a long time, a good majority of my length is texlaxed with maybe the last 3 or so inches of ends bonestraight. The difference is striking when wet and if I let it airdry undisturbed.:ohwell: I can't wait to get rid of these stick straight ends.:perplexed

I don't think I'd be able to pull of a "wash n go"---I haven't tried as of yet though. With the last 3 inches being stick straight, I don't htink that would go over too well.
 
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