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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

Evolving78

Well-Known Member
OK ladies. My hair salon is opening back up but I have no intention on going. :drunk: But I really need to dye these grays.:cry3:Does anyone have any suggestions for a home dye brand that I should consider? I would be applying it by myself and am fully natural so there's no creamy crack residue that it would be interacting with.

Suggestions? Or even any brands to avoid? Thanks much!
Textures and Tones Jet Black.
And the semi permanent is good for touch ups. It doesn’t turn hair green.
I use the semi permanent in between perm applications.
The perm (box)gives a nice rich black color. It isn’t running and easy to apply.
If you have a lot of hair, just make sure you buy 2boxes.
 

OmbreLune

Well-Known Member
OK ladies. My hair salon is opening back up but I have no intention on going. :drunk: But I really need to dye these grays.:cry3:Does anyone have any suggestions for a home dye brand that I should consider? I would be applying it by myself and am fully natural so there's no creamy crack residue that it would be interacting with.

Suggestions? Or even any brands to avoid? Thanks much!
If you want something temporary until you are ready to visit the salon try Overtone. Its a color depositing conditioner. Even if you don't use it with every wash it lasts a few weeks, at least it did for me. I finally get to color my hair without damage, I love it!
 

Kanky

Well-Known Member
I don’t even know what to say:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cn...-arent-spreading-new-infections-who-says.html

Coronavirus patients without symptoms aren't driving the spread of the virus, World Health Organization officials said Monday, casting doubt on concerns by some researchers that the disease could be difficult to contain due to asymptomatic infections.

Some people, particularly young and otherwise healthy individuals, who are infected by the coronavirus never develop symptoms or only develop mild symptoms. Others might not develop symptoms until days after they were actually infected.

Government responses should focus on detecting and isolating infected people with symptoms, and tracking anyone who might have come into contact with them, Van Kerkhove said. She acknowledged that some studies have indicated asymptomatic or presymptomatic spread in nursing homes and in household settings.

More research and data are needed to "truly answer" the question of whether the coronavirus can spread widely through asymptomatic carriers, Van Kerkhove added.

"We have a number of reports from countries who are doing very detailed contact tracing," she said. "They're following asymptomatic cases. They're following contacts. And they're not finding secondary transmission onward. It's very rare.


If asymptomatic spread proves to not be a main driver of coronavirus transmission, the policy implications could be tremendous. A report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published on April 1 cited the "potential for presymptomatic transmission" as a reason for the importance of social distancing.

"These findings also suggest that to control the pandemic, it might not be enough for only persons with symptoms to limit their contact with others because persons without symptoms might transmit infection," the CDC study said.

To be sure, asymptomatic and presymptomatic spread of the virus appears to still be happening, Van Kerkhove said but remains rare. That finding has important implications for how to screen for the virus and limit its spread.

"What we really want to be focused on is following the symptomatic cases," Van Kerkhove said. "If we actually followed all of the symptomatic cases, isolated those cases, followed the contacts and quarantined those contacts, we would drastically reduce" the outbreak.

Correction: An earlier headline should have said most asymptomatic coronavirus patients aren't spreading new infections. The word "most" was inadvertedly omitted.

This article is attempting to clarify the difference between asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic spread and how common this is.


https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/09/heal...onavirus-spread-explained-wellness/index.html
 

ThirdEyeBeauty

Well-Known Member
At this point, I'm just hoping there is enough information out there to prove to people having a vaccine up and ready (some are already ready but they are waiting to finish phase 2 and 3 of clinical trials) is a for-profit gimmick. I cannot imagine a vaccine being ready for 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023 or even 2024 but there are companies sitting on vials right now.

It can be fact checked. However if still interested I'll have some for sell in a few months and I can post on LHCF when I am ready. I need to make sure vaccines are still exempt from liability before I make that money...I mean before I can help anyone.
 

vevster

Well-Known Member
Ohio state senator blames coronavirus pandemic on ‘colored’ people not washing their hands


The American Civil Liberties Union is calling for an Ohio Republican state senator to resign or be fired after he questioned whether “the colored population” contracted coronavirus because they do not wash their hands.

According to the Columbus Dispatch, state Sen. Steve Huffman, who is white, made the offending comments during a committee hearing on Tuesday while questioning Angela Dawson, the executive director of the Ohio Commission on Minority Health and a black woman.


“I understand that African-Americans have a higher incidence of prior conditions and that makes them more susceptible to COVID, but does not make them more susceptible just to get COVID?” Huffman, himself a doctor from suburban Dayton, asked.

“We know it’s twice as often, correct? Could it just be that African-Americans – the colored population — do not wash their hands as well as other groups? Or wear a mask? Or do not socially distance themselves? Could that just be maybe the explanation of why there’s a higher incidence?”


That is not the opinion of leading medical experts in this country," Dawson replied.

Huffman’s comments were immediately decried by his legislative colleagues.
 

gn1g

Well-Known Member
Ohio state senator blames coronavirus pandemic on ‘colored’ people not washing their hands


The American Civil Liberties Union is calling for an Ohio Republican state senator to resign or be fired after he questioned whether “the colored population” contracted coronavirus because they do not wash their hands.

According to the Columbus Dispatch, state Sen. Steve Huffman, who is white, made the offending comments during a committee hearing on Tuesday while questioning Angela Dawson, the executive director of the Ohio Commission on Minority Health and a black woman.


“I understand that African-Americans have a higher incidence of prior conditions and that makes them more susceptible to COVID, but does not make them more susceptible just to get COVID?” Huffman, himself a doctor from suburban Dayton, asked.

“We know it’s twice as often, correct? Could it just be that African-Americans – the colored population — do not wash their hands as well as other groups? Or wear a mask? Or do not socially distance themselves? Could that just be maybe the explanation of why there’s a higher incidence?”


That is not the opinion of leading medical experts in this country," Dawson replied.

Huffman’s comments were immediately decried by his legislative colleagues.
I watched that on the news last evening and was flabbergasted. I mean he really tried it!
 

TrulyBlessed

Well-Known Member
Ohio state senator blames coronavirus pandemic on ‘colored’ people not washing their hands


The American Civil Liberties Union is calling for an Ohio Republican state senator to resign or be fired after he questioned whether “the colored population” contracted coronavirus because they do not wash their hands.

According to the Columbus Dispatch, state Sen. Steve Huffman, who is white, made the offending comments during a committee hearing on Tuesday while questioning Angela Dawson, the executive director of the Ohio Commission on Minority Health and a black woman.


“I understand that African-Americans have a higher incidence of prior conditions and that makes them more susceptible to COVID, but does not make them more susceptible just to get COVID?” Huffman, himself a doctor from suburban Dayton, asked.

“We know it’s twice as often, correct? Could it just be that African-Americans – the colored population — do not wash their hands as well as other groups? Or wear a mask? Or do not socially distance themselves? Could that just be maybe the explanation of why there’s a higher incidence?”


That is not the opinion of leading medical experts in this country," Dawson replied.

Huffman’s comments were immediately decried by his legislative colleagues.
:toocool:

 

Reinventing21

Spreading my wings
I keep reading how leaders are so resistant to a second lockdown regardless of numbers dying....


I also read an article today written by a sixty year old white man who was angered at the idea of older citizens being culled (allowed to die).

Right now, people in this country believe Covid is only a serious problem for third world/developing countries, ghetto people, minorities, elderly, all of whom are expendable in the name of the economy meant for the success of rich whites.

The revolution thag is going on now needs to go even bigger and I am seeing more issues being tackled. But it needs to go even bigger. Way bigger.
 

vevster

Well-Known Member
Uh oh.... will LHCF need to change to MHCF or SHCF?

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/news...ronavirus-spread-says-top-stylist/ar-BB15usv6

Women set to cut their hair short due to coronavirus spread, says top stylist

A bob is being seen as the “safe” alternative to “lengthy” blow drys for longer locks, according to Tim Hartley, a former director at Vidal Sassoon.

The hairdresser fears that the coronavirus is more likely to spread in long, wavy hair which has dominated female styles for years.

Mr Hartley said: “We have to think about maximising hygiene. The sooner the long tresses of yesterday are dispensed with, the more hygienic it will be for us all.

"The hour-long blow dries in the salon are no longer safe for the stylist or the client. Research suggests the Covid-19 virus is transmitted much easier through a swift airflow.”

He thinks the shorter cuts, popularised by his former boss Vidal Sassoon, are the solution to the stricter hygiene required during the Covid-19 crisis, reports Devon Live.

The bob cut became popular when sported by Hollywood star Louise Brooks during the 'flapper' era.

It came back into fashion during the 1960s when Twiggy had the chop.

The bob remains in fashion thanks to award winning actresses including Charlize Theron, Cate Blanchett, Tilda Swinton and Rosamund Pike.

Tim, a famous industry trendsetter, said: “With the bob cut you can wash your hair everyday and not worry about it. It becomes part of your routine. It’s the glamour without the fuss.”

Vidal Sassoon revolutionised hairdressing in the sixties by devising a way of putting a permanent wave in the hair, allowing it to dry naturally whilst retaining the style, Tim explained.

He said: “The bob cut started with icons like Mary Quant, but is now back with modern-day stars like Tilda Swinton and Rosamund Pike.

"It is in vogue again now and is the only way for the industry to emerge from this Covid lockdown. It can be anything from shoulder length to below the ears, depending on how bold you want to be."

 

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
I dont wash my hair every day when I get off from work. Corona isnt easily transmitted though hair unless you are touching your hair and not washing your hands then eating or putting hair in your mouth etc

If you want a bob get a bob but dont do it because of Corona



Hair is porous and corona is a protein so my hair better be stronger :lachen:
 
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