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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

meka72

Well-Known Member
I honestly wish the US was.... but we have a... let me shut my mouth...leader. This just aggravates me to no end. He has another opportunity to stop this, but I think he really does not see it. It is not on the radar. For a business man, he is terrible at numbers.
If you think about it, he’s handling the pandemic just like he handled his businesses: lying and scamming.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
Donald has NEVER been a businessman. He's ALWAYS been a con artist, a crook and a racist.
It's unfortunate for us that there are people in our country who admire him and feel he is deserving and capable to be the President of the United States. I despise him and I always have. When I awoke the morning after the election and saw he won, I was physically ill and almost four years later, I still feel ill.
I went to business school and all of the above is pretty consistent with the reason why businesses are regulated because they are usually run by con artists, crooks and racists. It's insane that people who punch a clock at companies that that :censored: them every paycheck thought that having a businessman run the country was a good idea.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I don’t understand the mentality of putting your progeny out there like this when the President is keeping his kid going to school remote. :confused:
People really believe it's a hoax or that the case numbers are overinflated. The hoax people are just stupid, however the people holding on to the overinflated numbers theory are depending solely on the odds of something that has affected less than 10% of the population to affect them. Normally, I would agree with math but the Big Joker in the Covid game of spades is not having any idea how many Asymptomatic carriers are in the population because those people will likely never get tested so the true percentage could be a big chunk of the population.
 

scarcity21

Well-Known Member
2 thoughts for the day:

  1. I think the media is focusing on the # of cases where we should also look at the death rate. The death rate in many European countries is in the double digits and in certain places like Florida is is much lower e.g. 1.4 %
  2. Chatting with folks online I'm finding, and a poster on this thread did mention that it takes MORE vitamin D to boost levels. This white guy was telling me that he boosted his levels to 60 plus by taking 1,000 IUs per day and I'm taking 30,000 per day and am only at 42 ng/mls.
@vevster wherecarecyiu buying 30,000 of vitD? Is it prescription?
 

vevster

Well-Known Member
Propaganda Alert!
https://www.nydailynews.com/coronav...0200805-odmsj5m4tzemlhhpuebhq3itxm-story.html


I've been hearing for weeks that ozone is being used successfully for corona virus treatment. But yet again it is another inexpensive treatment that Big Pharma can't make money out of hence these type of articles.

For the record, my dentist uses ozone and I've had IV ozone and treatments like the mayor had :lol: It works! Ozone kills EVERYTHING.


Brazilian mayor touts unproven ozone therapy — through anus — as ‘excellent’ coronavirus treatment

OK, now we’ve surely hit the bottom.

A mayor in Brazil is being widely ridiculed this week after promoting rectal injections of ozone as an “excellent” coronavirus treatment — an outlandish proposal with no proven effectiveness.

“It is a simple, fast application of two, three minutes a day,” said Volnei Morastoni, mayor of the southern city of Itajaí, in a since-deleted Facebook Live video on Monday.

“It will probably be a rectal application,” he said, “which is a very easy, very fast application... with a thin catheter and this gives an excellent result.”

Brazilian scientists quickly debunked Morastoni’s theory and urged him not to offer the treatment in his city.

A researcher and microbiologist from the country’s largest university told Brazil’s Folha de S. Paulo newspaper that ozone therapy is a “quackery that is said to cure cancer” with no scientific evidence.



 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
Propaganda Alert!
https://www.nydailynews.com/coronav...0200805-odmsj5m4tzemlhhpuebhq3itxm-story.html


I've been hearing for weeks that ozone is being used successfully for corona virus treatment. But yet again it is another inexpensive treatment that Big Pharma can't make money out of hence these type of articles.

For the record, my dentist uses ozone and I've had IV ozone and treatments like the mayor had :lol: It works! Ozone kills EVERYTHING.
Ozone is legit but why the anus?
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
:lol: LOL, It is an orifice that the ozone can permeate. I've used it in my sinuses too. My dentist loves it for gum issues... plus she uses it when doing fillings and other dentistry....

There is a clinical trial going on right now that I am watching. I just want to follow one to see what is what.
Thanks. Can you stare the link to the trial? I’m interested in learning more.
 

Maracujá

November 2020 --> 14 years natural!!!
In the chronicles of the pandemic lifestyle:

Me: * sees automatic alert asking me to delete emails I haven't read in aeons *
"Oh waw, this is the bomb! Artificial intelligence is the bomb. I have no idea what people are complaining about."

Also me: * tries to talk to a chatbot to find out about my package's whereabouts *
"Artificial intelligence is messence at best. Who thought of this? Who do I have to see about this?!"

Literally on the same day too
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I'm not posting this to be funny. The disgust factor aside, if her co-worker is asymptomatic, she just exposed herself by inhaling all the halitosis he spit in that mask. That her co-workers mask was in her car instead of on his face meant they were rendering wearing masks useless anyway. You ain't supposed to be mask free around nobody who ain't part of your household. This is what I'm talking about when I say I don't believe people who say they have no idea how they get the virus.

 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
Wasn’t sure where to put this. Heartbreaking story.


It was me. I know it was me.’
Francene Bailey, on passing the coronavirus to her mother



By Eli Saslow
MAY 30, 2020


They keep telling me it’s not my fault, and I’d give anything to believe that. The doctor called after my mom went to the hospital and said: “Don’t blame yourself. You didn’t do anything wrong.” The pastor said basically the same thing at her funeral. “Let it go. You had nothing to do with this.”

About this series
Voices from the Pandemic is an oral history of covid-19 and those affected.
I know they’re trying to make me feel better, but it’s a lie. I had everything to do with it. This virus doesn’t just appear in your body out of nowhere. It has to pass from one person to the next. It has to come from somebody, and this time I know it came from me.

I keep thinking: What if I’d stopped going to work when the first people started to get sick? What if I didn’t live with my mom? What if I’d stayed upstairs in my room like I’d been doing all week? What if I’d kept my mask on? What if I’d turned away when she reached out to hug me? We only had close contact that one time, and it barely lasted a few minutes, but that was all it took. A week later she was in the hospital. Ten days after that she was gone. That’s the timeline I have to live with, and it points right back to me. I got sick and then she got sick. I lived and she died. How am I supposed to let go of that?

The thing is, I was trying so hard to be careful from the very beginning. It’s not like I was one of those people who didn’t pay attention. I work at a nursing home. I knew how fast this virus could spread. As soon as a few of the residents started spiking fevers in March, I went online to buy extra masks. We didn’t have the right protective supplies, and you can’t social distance when you’re a nursing aide. I work on the lockdown unit. These people need a lot of help. We feed. We wash. We do everything. I came home one day with a slight headache, and then I started to cough. My mom said to me: “This doesn’t sound like your sinuses. This is different.”

I told her not to come too close to me. She was healthy for a 70-year-old lady, but I wanted to be safe. I called off work. I moved out of the bedroom I share with my daughter and her father so I had my own space upstairs. I started drifting away from everybody. I didn’t know for sure if I had corona yet because I was waiting on the test, but I had a good idea. My 5-year-old would stand outside the room for hours calling after me. She likes to cuddle underneath you. That’s the kind of person she is. She kept banging on the door. “Mommy. Mommy. Let me come in.” I begged for her to go away. “Please, baby. Pretend like I’m not here.” She wouldn’t leave. Eventually, I had to stop answering.

We’re a tight family, and all of us have been living on top of each other in this house for 20 years. That’s how we like it. It’s the Jamaican way. I’m upstairs with my kids and my sister is downstairs with hers, and my mom went back and forth. We share the bills and the child care. We rely on each other. Some days, we might have 15 people staying here, and my mom was always at the center. She wasn’t a person of so many words, but she would sit in the kitchen all day, watching and listening. She knew I had something bad. She had 10 children, and she’s a caretaker. I had to fight her from coming into the room. She told me to steam my head with orange and lemon. She started making this tea drink. It had turmeric, garlic, lime, honey and ginger. She would put it in a cup and leave it at the door five or six times a day. She stood outside in the hall and called me on the phone to make sure I was drinking it. “Put the phone where I can hear it go down.” When I lost my voice and couldn’t talk, she would stand out there and text me. “Did you drink it? All of it?”

Francene Bailey and her large family have lived at this house in Hartford, Conn., for 20 years. (Katye Martens Brier for The Washington Post)
Anytime I heard people moving around in the hall, I would never go outside. If I needed to leave the room, I waited until it was quiet. They say the average person gives this virus to three or four people, but I thought: This is going to die inside me. I drove myself to go get the test. I drove myself to the hospital a few days later. I drove myself to the pharmacy to get all the meds even though I was hyperventilating so bad I could barely hold onto the steering wheel. I took Clorox with me every time I went to the bathroom and tried to sanitize behind myself, but sometimes it got too hard to stand. I would text my mom and my sister: “I sprayed the bleach but I had to leave it.”

At night, I was like an animal. I couldn’t breathe, and lying down made it worse. I was running a fever and the doctor said I had pneumonia. I drank so much cough syrup that my body started to smell like it. I would pace in the bedroom all night, from the wall to the doorway and back, counting steps and watching the clock. My mom has the bedroom right underneath mine, so she could hear my feet on the floor, and she would call in the night. “Are you okay? Francene, you’re scaring me.”

One day, my back and my neck were on fire and I couldn’t keep walking. I tried to lie down, and it felt like the whole house was falling in on me. It felt like I was dying, and I started to have a panic attack. I took off running because I wanted to find air. I went downstairs, and I kind of tripped over my slippers. My mom heard me, and she came to the bottom of the stairs. I was gasping and sobbing. I couldn’t talk. She told me: “Take off your mask. Let the air in.”

I pulled my mask down around my neck, and she held me. I needed it, and she needed to help. Our faces were touching. I was breathing on her. I wasn’t thinking about anything. I leaned on her until I was calm again, and then I put my mask back on and went upstairs. I tried to forget about it. It was only two or three minutes. I didn’t even know for sure yet if I was positive for the virus. I tried to tell myself it would be fine.

A few days later, I heard her start to cough downstairs in her room. It was nighttime, and I leaned against the floorboards to listen. I said, “Oh God, no. No. Please, Jesus, don’t let her be sick.”

But I already knew. She sounded exactly like me.

She had diabetes, so maybe that’s why it went downhill fast. I don’t know. She was so out of it that she stopped taking some of her other medications. I talked to her once over the phone when she was at the hospital. She had a Z-pack mask on her face, and the doctors didn’t want her to do much talking. They were trying to get ready to put her on a ventilator. I told her she needed to listen to the doctors. I told her I was sorry. I didn’t have my voice back, so I was kind of whispering, and I’m not sure if she could hear me or understand me. She said: “Don’t worry about me. Focus on yourself. Are you drinking the tea? Please, drink the tea.”

I was still in isolation in the bedroom when her doctor called again. The Department of Health told me to stay up there until three days after I stopped having symptoms. It was 7 in the morning, and I was winded from taking a shower. Sometimes, it took two hours for me to recover from the shower and get dressed. The doctor said they were doing chest compressions, but she wasn’t going to make it. He said it wasn’t my fault — that the virus could have come from anywhere. I told him: “What do you mean? She never even left the house. It was me. I know it was me, and I killed her.” I threw the phone. I was so lost and so angry. I didn’t want to hear it.

The phone kept ringing. People started coming over to grieve, and I heard them downstairs, crying and consoling each other. A few of them knocked on my door. They were worried. Nobody was blaming me. My 19-year-old stood in the doorway and talked to me for like an hour, telling me it was okay, trying to get me to come out. I told him: “I’m not getting near anybody.” I closed the door and stayed upstairs by myself.

It’s been almost a week since the funeral, and I’m still afraid to go outside. I’m scared to be within 10 feet of anybody. I start shaking whenever I walk out the door. What if I catch it all over again, or what if I can still give it to someone else? The doctor told me that’s not factual, since they cleared me as recovered. He says it’s paranoia and anxiety. He wrote me a prescription and told me to take two tablets every time I leave the house, but it’s easier to stay here. If I’m by myself, nothing else can go wrong.
 

Shimmie

"God is the Only Truth -- Period"
Staff member
Wasn’t sure where to put this. Heartbreaking story.


It was me. I know it was me.’
Francene Bailey, on passing the coronavirus to her mother



By Eli Saslow
MAY 30, 2020


They keep telling me it’s not my fault, and I’d give anything to believe that. The doctor called after my mom went to the hospital and said: “Don’t blame yourself. You didn’t do anything wrong.” The pastor said basically the same thing at her funeral. “Let it go. You had nothing to do with this.”

About this series
Voices from the Pandemic is an oral history of covid-19 and those affected.
I know they’re trying to make me feel better, but it’s a lie. I had everything to do with it. This virus doesn’t just appear in your body out of nowhere. It has to pass from one person to the next. It has to come from somebody, and this time I know it came from me.

I keep thinking: What if I’d stopped going to work when the first people started to get sick? What if I didn’t live with my mom? What if I’d stayed upstairs in my room like I’d been doing all week? What if I’d kept my mask on? What if I’d turned away when she reached out to hug me? We only had close contact that one time, and it barely lasted a few minutes, but that was all it took. A week later she was in the hospital. Ten days after that she was gone. That’s the timeline I have to live with, and it points right back to me. I got sick and then she got sick. I lived and she died. How am I supposed to let go of that?

The thing is, I was trying so hard to be careful from the very beginning. It’s not like I was one of those people who didn’t pay attention. I work at a nursing home. I knew how fast this virus could spread. As soon as a few of the residents started spiking fevers in March, I went online to buy extra masks. We didn’t have the right protective supplies, and you can’t social distance when you’re a nursing aide. I work on the lockdown unit. These people need a lot of help. We feed. We wash. We do everything. I came home one day with a slight headache, and then I started to cough. My mom said to me: “This doesn’t sound like your sinuses. This is different.”

I told her not to come too close to me. She was healthy for a 70-year-old lady, but I wanted to be safe. I called off work. I moved out of the bedroom I share with my daughter and her father so I had my own space upstairs. I started drifting away from everybody. I didn’t know for sure if I had corona yet because I was waiting on the test, but I had a good idea. My 5-year-old would stand outside the room for hours calling after me. She likes to cuddle underneath you. That’s the kind of person she is. She kept banging on the door. “Mommy. Mommy. Let me come in.” I begged for her to go away. “Please, baby. Pretend like I’m not here.” She wouldn’t leave. Eventually, I had to stop answering.

We’re a tight family, and all of us have been living on top of each other in this house for 20 years. That’s how we like it. It’s the Jamaican way. I’m upstairs with my kids and my sister is downstairs with hers, and my mom went back and forth. We share the bills and the child care. We rely on each other. Some days, we might have 15 people staying here, and my mom was always at the center. She wasn’t a person of so many words, but she would sit in the kitchen all day, watching and listening. She knew I had something bad. She had 10 children, and she’s a caretaker. I had to fight her from coming into the room. She told me to steam my head with orange and lemon. She started making this tea drink. It had turmeric, garlic, lime, honey and ginger. She would put it in a cup and leave it at the door five or six times a day. She stood outside in the hall and called me on the phone to make sure I was drinking it. “Put the phone where I can hear it go down.” When I lost my voice and couldn’t talk, she would stand out there and text me. “Did you drink it? All of it?”

Francene Bailey and her large family have lived at this house in Hartford, Conn., for 20 years. (Katye Martens Brier for The Washington Post)
Anytime I heard people moving around in the hall, I would never go outside. If I needed to leave the room, I waited until it was quiet. They say the average person gives this virus to three or four people, but I thought: This is going to die inside me. I drove myself to go get the test. I drove myself to the hospital a few days later. I drove myself to the pharmacy to get all the meds even though I was hyperventilating so bad I could barely hold onto the steering wheel. I took Clorox with me every time I went to the bathroom and tried to sanitize behind myself, but sometimes it got too hard to stand. I would text my mom and my sister: “I sprayed the bleach but I had to leave it.”

At night, I was like an animal. I couldn’t breathe, and lying down made it worse. I was running a fever and the doctor said I had pneumonia. I drank so much cough syrup that my body started to smell like it. I would pace in the bedroom all night, from the wall to the doorway and back, counting steps and watching the clock. My mom has the bedroom right underneath mine, so she could hear my feet on the floor, and she would call in the night. “Are you okay? Francene, you’re scaring me.”

One day, my back and my neck were on fire and I couldn’t keep walking. I tried to lie down, and it felt like the whole house was falling in on me. It felt like I was dying, and I started to have a panic attack. I took off running because I wanted to find air. I went downstairs, and I kind of tripped over my slippers. My mom heard me, and she came to the bottom of the stairs. I was gasping and sobbing. I couldn’t talk. She told me: “Take off your mask. Let the air in.”

I pulled my mask down around my neck, and she held me. I needed it, and she needed to help. Our faces were touching. I was breathing on her. I wasn’t thinking about anything. I leaned on her until I was calm again, and then I put my mask back on and went upstairs. I tried to forget about it. It was only two or three minutes. I didn’t even know for sure yet if I was positive for the virus. I tried to tell myself it would be fine.

A few days later, I heard her start to cough downstairs in her room. It was nighttime, and I leaned against the floorboards to listen. I said, “Oh God, no. No. Please, Jesus, don’t let her be sick.”

But I already knew. She sounded exactly like me.

She had diabetes, so maybe that’s why it went downhill fast. I don’t know. She was so out of it that she stopped taking some of her other medications. I talked to her once over the phone when she was at the hospital. She had a Z-pack mask on her face, and the doctors didn’t want her to do much talking. They were trying to get ready to put her on a ventilator. I told her she needed to listen to the doctors. I told her I was sorry. I didn’t have my voice back, so I was kind of whispering, and I’m not sure if she could hear me or understand me. She said: “Don’t worry about me. Focus on yourself. Are you drinking the tea? Please, drink the tea.”

I was still in isolation in the bedroom when her doctor called again. The Department of Health told me to stay up there until three days after I stopped having symptoms. It was 7 in the morning, and I was winded from taking a shower. Sometimes, it took two hours for me to recover from the shower and get dressed. The doctor said they were doing chest compressions, but she wasn’t going to make it. He said it wasn’t my fault — that the virus could have come from anywhere. I told him: “What do you mean? She never even left the house. It was me. I know it was me, and I killed her.” I threw the phone. I was so lost and so angry. I didn’t want to hear it.

The phone kept ringing. People started coming over to grieve, and I heard them downstairs, crying and consoling each other. A few of them knocked on my door. They were worried. Nobody was blaming me. My 19-year-old stood in the doorway and talked to me for like an hour, telling me it was okay, trying to get me to come out. I told him: “I’m not getting near anybody.” I closed the door and stayed upstairs by myself.

It’s been almost a week since the funeral, and I’m still afraid to go outside. I’m scared to be within 10 feet of anybody. I start shaking whenever I walk out the door. What if I catch it all over again, or what if I can still give it to someone else? The doctor told me that’s not factual, since they cleared me as recovered. He says it’s paranoia and anxiety. He wrote me a prescription and told me to take two tablets every time I leave the house, but it’s easier to stay here. If I’m by myself, nothing else can go wrong.
Dear Father...please heal her broken heart. She didn’t catch the virus on purpose. This dear daughter needs healing in her soul and set free from torturing herself.

What a beautiful love her mother poured upon and into her... a Mother’s love that fears no sacrifice to embrace her child when they are hurting.

Her Mom, knelt, to hold her “baby”, as Mothers do, to kiss and make it better. Her loving words, that soft and gentle whisper... “breathe baby... breathe. Mommie’s here, don’t be afraid...just breathe...”

This Mother was ready to “rest in peace”. No price too great to bear, for love to share with her child. “Breathe”

:rosebud:
 

yamilee21

Well-Known Member
NYC offers free hotel rooms to people who cannot easily isolate or quarantine from members of their households, but it is such an underutilized program. Even though this happened in Hartford, and a hotel program might not have been available at the time, I wonder if publicizing more stories like that of this woman who lost her mother would help in getting people to be more willing to utilize the hotel program. People worry about the “inconvenience” of being stuck in a hotel room for two weeks (for free, with WiFi, cable tv, 3 meals and snacks every day, and nurses to check up on them), but don’t seem to think about the inconvenience to their parents, grandparents, siblings, cousins, etc., who are repeatedly exposed to Covid-19 by living with them while they are contagious.
 

Alta Angel

Well-Known Member
My county made the choice to go digital until the case numbers start decreasing. Parents are protesting and outraged because they insist that they did not have a voice. As a teacher, I was going to opt for virtual no matter what and my children were going to learn remotely. It sucked because my girls did not have an AAU season.

We have already had cases of teachers catching the virus during our 3 week planning. We also have had some students in the county contract the virus through football practice. Our schools start on Aug 17.


So we're asked to choose between blended and remote learning for NYC public school children. I chose remote for DD (she's tiiiiight about that) for her 6th grade year and blended for DS#2 who with my foot securely up his butt and God willing will be in the 12th grade. The blended option can be changed at anytime to fully remote.
What education options are you ladies using for the upcoming school year? What choices have you been presented with? How much risk are YOU taking with YOUR progeny?
 
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