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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

lavaflow99

In search of the next vacation
This virus has no chill. :nono:

First Confirmed Cases of COVID-19 Reinfections in US
Brenda Goodman, MA
October 12, 2020





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Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center.
A 25-year-old man from Nevada and a 42-year-old man in Virginia experienced second bouts of COVID-19 about 2 months after they tested positive the first time. Gene tests show both men had two slightly different strains of the virus, suggesting that they caught the infection twice.
Researchers say these are the first documented cases of COVID-19 reinfection in the U.S. About two dozen other cases of COVID-19 reinfection have been reported around the globe, from Hong Kong, Belgium, the Netherlands, India, and Ecuador. A third U.S. case, in a 60-year-old in Washington, has been reported but hasn't yet been peer reviewed.
Until now, immunologists haven't been too concerned about these reinfections because most second infections have been milder than the first, indicating that the immune system is doing its job and fighting off the virus when it is recognized a second time.

Unlike most of those cases, however, the men in Reno, NV, and Virginia, and a 46-year-old man in Ecuador, had more severe symptoms during their second infections, potentially complicating the development and deployment of effective vaccines.
The U.S. cases are detailed in new studies published in The Lancet and the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.
"Coronaviruses are known to reinfect people — the seasonal ones — and so it's not very surprising to see reinfections occurring with this particular coronavirus," said Akiko Iwasaki, PhD, an immunobiologist at Yale University who was not involved in either study. "And the fact that there is more severe disease the second time around. It could a be a one-in-a-million event, we don't know. We're just becoming aware of the reinfection cases, and they are just a handful among millions of people infected."
The Nevada man originally got sick on March 25. His symptoms included a sore throat, cough, headache, nausea, and diarrhea. A test taken at a community event held on April 18 confirmed COVID-19. His symptoms gradually subsided and he reported feeling better on April 27. He tested negative for the virus twice after he recovered.


About a month later, the man went to an urgent care center with a fever, headache, dizziness, cough, nausea, and diarrhea. They sent him home. Five days later, he went to the doctor again, this time with difficulty breathing and low blood oxygen. They told him to go to the ER. He was admitted to the hospital on June 5. Lung X-rays showed telltale patches of cloudiness, known as ground-glass opacities, and a nasal swab test confirmed COVID-19. Gene testing of the two swabs, from April and June, showed key changes to the genetic instructions for the virus in the second test, suggesting that he'd gotten a slightly different strain the second time.
The Virginia man — a military health care provider — was infected the first time at work. He tested positive in late March after getting a cough, fever, and body aches. He recovered after 10 days and was well for nearly 2 more months. In late May, however, a member of his family got COVID-19, and he then got sick again with a fever, cough, difficulty breathing, and stomach upset. A chest X-ray confirmed pneumonia. His symptoms were worse the second time. Gene testing of the virus from each of his swabs indicated slight changes, suggesting he was infected twice.

There are other possibilities, including that the virus somehow went silent in his body for a few weeks and then became active again. The study authors think this is unlikely because it would mean that the virus is changing at a much faster pace than has been seen so far.

They also can't tell whether the severity of symptoms the men experienced the second time were related to the virus or to how their immune systems reacted to it. Were they sicker because they got a larger dose of the virus? Was there something about the gene changes to the virus that made it more damaging when the men caught it again? Or could their first COVID-19 infections have somehow primed their immune systems the wrong way, leading to more severe infections the second time — a phenomenon called enhancement?


Scientists are racing to try to understand all those things and more — what reinfection means and how common it may be. If it happens frequently, that could complicate efforts to reach a level of community protection known as herd immunity. Vaccines may need to be tweaked to keep up with the virus as it evolves, and people may need regular boosters to maintain their protection.


"We need more research to understand how long immunity may last for people exposed to SARS-CoV-2 and why some of these second infections, while rare, are presenting as more severe," study author Mark Pandori, PhD, of the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory, said in a news release.


"So far, we've only seen a handful of reinfection cases, but that doesn't mean there aren't more, especially as many cases of COVID-19 are asymptomatic," he said. "Right now, we can only speculate about the cause of reinfection."


Researchers stress that everyone should protect themselves from COVID-19 infection, even if they're sure they've had it before, by wearing a face mask in public, staying at least 6 feet away from others, and washing and sanitizing hands often.


SOURCES:


Akiko Iwasaki, PhD, Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.


The Lancet, Oct. 1, 2020.


Clinical Infectious Diseases, Sept. 19, 2020.
 

oneastrocurlie

Well-Known Member
Officially working from home until 12/31. I had a feeling it was coming but glad they finally called it. A friend's husband's job said they are out until March 2021. That would make it a full year. I can only hope we get the same news.

Meanwhile, I've seen a post for a halloween party and a sweetest day sip and paint this week. And these are being hosted in people's regular degular homes. Not even an event space.

Going to be a llllllooonnnggg winter man.
 

SoniT

Well-Known Member
I'm knowing more and more people personally who've had Covid-19. My niece and nephew's maternal grandfather had it and passed away last week. His sisters also have it and one is in the hospital. My husband's college friend was hospitalized for over a month. She spent some of that time in ICU and also had to go to rehab to regain her strength and mobility. She's home now but still not 100% back to her old self. This virus is no joke.
 

Shimmie

"God is the Only Truth -- Period"
Staff member
I'm knowing more and more people personally who've had Covid-19. My niece and nephew's maternal grandfather had it and passed away last week. His sisters also have it and one is in the hospital. My husband's college friend was hospitalized for over a month. She spent some of that time in ICU and also had to go to rehab to regain her strength and mobility. She's home now but still not 100% back to her old self. This virus is no joke.
:pray: For your family and everyone here on this Forum :pray:
 

BonBon

Well-Known Member

Covid-19 may cause sudden and permanent hearing loss, experts have found, adding that such problems need early detection and urgent treatment.

The coronavirus has been found to affect the body in myriad ways, from a loss of taste and smell to organ damage.
Now doctors have reported fresh evidence that Covid could also affect hearing.
Writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports, experts at University College London report the case of a 45-year-old man with asthma who was admitted to intensive care with Covid, ventilated, and given drugs including the antiviral remdesivir and intravenous steroids.
A week after leaving intensive care he developed a ringing sound – tinnitus – and then hearing loss in his left ear.
The team say none of the medications the man was given would be expected to cause damage to his hearing, while he had no problems with his ear canals or ear drums. Further investigation showed no sign of autoimmune problems, while he did not have flu or HIV – conditions previously linked to hearing loss. What’s more, the man had never had hearing problems before.
Subsequent tests revealed the man had sensorineural hearing loss in his left ear – a situation where the inner ear or the nerve responsible for sound is inflamed or damaged. This was treated with steroids with partial success.

The case is the first such incident to be reported in the UK, although a small number of similar reports have emerged from other countries.
Dr Stefania Koumpa, a co-author of the study, said it is not yet known how Covid might cause hearing loss, but there are possible explanations.
“It is possible that the Sars-Cov-2 virus enters inner ear cells and brings about cell death, and/or causes the body to release inflammatory chemicals called cytokines that can be toxic to the inner ear,” she said. “Steroids likely help by reducing inflammation and therefore production of cytokines.”
The team say Covid patients in intensive care should be asked about hearing loss and referred for emergency treatment.
“Even single-sided hearing loss has great consequences on one’s quality of life, if not promptly treated,” said Koumpa.
Kevin Munro, professor of audiology at the University of Manchester, who was not involved in the work, said it is known that other viruses, including measles and mumps, can affect hearing, while he has been contacted by a large number of Covid survivors reporting a change in their hearing or tinnitus.

Work from his team previously found that 16 of 121 patients admitted to hospital with Covid, and who completed a survey, reported hearing problems about two months after discharge.
Munro said his team is now investigating the prevalence and causes of such problems, noting it is unclear whether they are down to the virus itself, the immune system response, stress, or even treatments for Covid – or whether it could simply be that hearing problems become apparent in a noisy hospital where individuals wear masks.
“I think there’s likely to be lots of explanations for why people were reporting problems,” he said.
 

BonBon

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure we can automatically attribute reinfections just to personal behaviour.

I'm lucky to be a remote worker. They've sent teachers and lecturers back in my country and covid is running rampant among students. Not to mention customer facing, close contact jobs and medical.

I'm sure some of the people aren't bothered, but others are forced to go back into risky shared spaces/public transport even though they are fearful. I've definitely seen many irresponsible scenes, but I don't want to forget the people who follow the rules as much as they can, but still have a higher chance of infection and reinfection through their circumstances.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
No, because Big Pharma advertises on the news shows and will never promote that stuff. I am so glad we have the internet to do research ourselves.
True but I thought people would get into it on their own. You can't get the drugs he was on unless you're sick and, even then, you can't get the experimental stuff. But vitamin d, zinc, and all the stuff we've discussed here is available to everyone. I guess I thought that it would be "legitimized" since the president's doctors have him on it but it seems it was just glossed over. I'm disappointed but I guess I shouldn't be surprised.
 

awhyley

Well-Known Member
I'm knowing more and more people personally who've had Covid-19.
This is what I'm fearful about. Cases keep rising over here (5,000+), so hearing about persons close to home getting tested and fighting the virus makes this all too real. It was bad enough in the abstract but putting faces of people you know on it is horrifying and getting worse.

(Condolences to your family)

Dr. Fauci, in an interview with another one of his celebrity friends, Trevor Noah, says he takes 6,000 IUs of Vitamin D daily.
Whoa, but for his age (and hanging about Trump and the cronies), I can see why. He needs every protection he can get.
 

vevster

Well-Known Member
True but I thought people would get into it on their own. You can't get the drugs he was on unless you're sick and, even then, you can't get the experimental stuff. But vitamin d, zinc, and all the stuff we've discussed here is available to everyone. I guess I thought that it would be "legitimized" since the president's doctors have him on it but it seems it was just glossed over. I'm disappointed but I guess I shouldn't be surprised.
They initially mentioned it, then just focused on the Regeneron and Remdesivir. I just had a minor cold and did the Gundry 'Hammer'(3 days of 150,000 IUs vitamin D) and it resolved so quickly!
 
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vevster

Well-Known Member
Hi @vevster! Which vitamin D brand / where did you get yours? Thank you!
I love this brand by Dr. Berg. It contains other things that facilitates absorption. If you have ebates he gives 6% back!

 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
True but I thought people would get into it on their own. You can't get the drugs he was on unless you're sick and, even then, you can't get the experimental stuff. But vitamin d, zinc, and all the stuff we've discussed here is available to everyone. I guess I thought that it would be "legitimized" since the president's doctors have him on it but it seems it was just glossed over. I'm disappointed but I guess I shouldn't be surprised.
Half the population won't wear a mask. Even more aren't disciplined enough to maintain a vitamin regimen without a pandemic. The average person's medicine cabinet is a graveyard for vitamins whose containers will collect dust after being opened a few times.
 

BonBon

Well-Known Member
-_-

A manager at my DH's work has just found out his wife has Covid.

Yesterday he was all over the site talking to people and held a 2 hour, closed door meeting about a metre in front of the staff. DH's boss was trying to Kanye shrug it off but the staff complained and now they are buying tests for everyone.

DH's boss, who was not concerned about the risk, had shared a small meeting room with the potentially infected manager for hours. He tried to reassure the staff with stories about how his son shared a long car ride with an infected person and tested negative, so everything is just blown out of proportion....

He's called into today now saying he has symptoms and is getting tested -_- He never takes a day off, so it must be obvious covid.
 
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naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I have seen more masks pulled out of filthy pockets, purses, off car seats, car floors, with debris on them (probably both sides) that I just keep mine on my face all day until I get inside. I took my mask off once in the car and the next thing I knew it was on the floor. I'm not putting that next to my face but a lot of people do and while I got a pretty secure stash, I try to only use one mask a day.

Quite frankly, I officially became the person who wears my mask in my car by myself after this video. The only person I ride with is the old man but I would have the same reaction to putting on anybody else's mask. This is like sharing toothbrushes to me. Other people can do that. That's not what I do.

That 'pause' when realization hit. Lordt I almost burst my spleen.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Have you all been watching the numbers? NY was the epicenter, with one of, if not the, highest case rate per million population a few months ago. Now, 18 states have higher infection rates than NY. The state with the highest rate right now? North Dakota! :shocked:
I mentioned a few months ago it would move from urban areas to rural central states and here we are. Those same governors aren't claiming its fake anymore. Especially since cities in the central states are running out of ICU beds. tRump keeps LYING about NY...saying everyone is dying there when in reality the infection rate is down to 1%. Here in North florida SURROUNDED by rural counties, our county still has a 7-8% infection rate. Not to mention the fact that the graveyard next to my job has been digging holes overtime. Doggone DeSantis doesn't care about us. Just businesses. The sad part is...many of these businesses might not make it past Christmas.
 
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