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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I can’t see because of my glasses. It’s the glare it causes. But I’m getting a new script, so I will try them out again.
This is the style that I have and it fits over my glasses. It doesn't fog up but it also doesn't have that head band across the top

 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
This is our clue that the food chain is about to be disrupted. Thanks Nebraska.

I was just thinking that I wasn’t going to worry about stocking up because we had so much food before and are just now at a point where we’ve eaten enough that there’s room in the freezer for more. So much for that. I’m going to get meat this week and fill the freezer back up.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I have been wearing a face shield with mask since after Thanksgiving weekend. We had so many people test positive or come in close contact that we just shut everything down the last 2 weeks of the year. The only thing is that my face shield has the insert to cover my glasses but I really want one with that head band thing to seal off anything dropping between my face and the mask. Unfortunately I think wearing contacts might have me more likely to rub my eyes during the day and that's a no no.
The one with the blue stripe at the top and foam strip on your forehead is like $20.xxx for a pack of 8. But I'm sure there are some nicer ones with a nice seal out there. I see ppl wearing that more fashionable one but there is a huge space between it. All I see is airborne droplets falling through in my mind.

EDITED...I see you posted the more fashionable one. I wanted that one but that space in between. Nah I'm good. I need that foam.
 
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naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
People are so dumb. :I someone was arguing that lockdowns don't work, but, East Asia and Australia/NZ are doing okay comparatively. :/

Anyway.

I work in an office, but because of my dept I work in the office 4 to 5 days a week (have been this whole time.) Well, we brought people back in Sept - to Nov but covid spiked and most people went back home. But, now once again we're bringing them back as cases rise here and while a coworker is burying his brother bc of covid.

Why?

I know I'm going to be so stressed when they're back:( I have to cover for our receptionist I'm not looking forward to being out in the open
We still don't have people in the office but I went on and ordered some $400 4 ft glass shields for the counselors in the back offices and then I'm gonna spend a grip on those plexiglass shields like what you see in the banks for our staff who sit more at stations. I already ordered THEM some 6 foot cubicle partitions so they can have separation because they can't socially distance. (Imagine a bank area) and even though we keep a skeleton crew everyday, some people have issues remoting in and so they will come work in the office. So that will protect them. We still have approval from USDA to waive physical presence for our clients so that gives us time for the permanent plexiglass. So right now we are still masking up and really keeping ourselves from each other. We even just call the person in the next office over rather than walk over if it can be helped. I have another staff member who is currently DOWN with COVID-19 but thanks to remote work I haven't been near her in over a week.
 

brg240

Well-Known Member
I’m going to look into getting this style! Thank you!
I have this style too. And it works well worth my glasses
We still don't have people in the office but I went on and ordered some $400 4 ft glass shields for the counselors in the back offices and then I'm gonna spend a grip on those plexiglass shields like what you see in the banks for our staff who sit more at stations. I already ordered THEM some 6 foot cubicle partitions so they can have separation because they can't socially distance. (Imagine a bank area) and even though we keep a skeleton crew everyday, some people have issues remoting in and so they will come work in the office. So that will protect them. We still have approval from USDA to waive physical presence for our clients so that gives us time for the permanent plexiglass. So right now we are still masking up and really keeping ourselves from each other. We even just call the person in the next office over rather than walk over if it can be helped. I have another staff member who is currently DOWN with COVID-19 but thanks to remote work I haven't been near her in over a week.
Oh that's good that so many precations are being used. I hope your staff member recovers.


Thankfully i spend the majority of the time in my office but I cover for the receptionist during her break and when she's out (and she will be out for a 1-6 weeks bc of knee surgery.)

She only has plexi on one side of the desk so I'll def be wearing my mask and a shield.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
The one with the blue stripe at the top and foam strip on your forehead is like $20.xxx for a pack of 8. But I'm sure there are some nicer ones with a nice seal out there. I see ppl wearing that more fashionable one but there is a huge space between it. All I see is airborne droplets falling through in my mind.

EDITED...I see you posted the more fashionable one. I wanted that one but that space in between. Nah I'm good. I need that foam.
Trust me, it's not about the fashion. I have one with the foam strip but my glasses cause both a fit and fogging issue.
 

awhyley

Well-Known Member
Is anyone else feeling the need to have a supply of essentials on hand like; toilet paper, bleach, water, canned goods?

Someone just mentioned to me yesterday that production has not bounced back from last year and that shortages will resume again soon. I thought that he was crazy but now yall gat me concerned. *puts club pack toilet paper on the list*
 

Lylddlebit

Well-Known Member
"Don't follow my example" statements when the consequences are settling up don't really move me either but I do understand their use. The thing is there are usually a lot more people who are as foolish or unwise as the person giving the message and it can be an effective vehicle for whomever it reaches(No not everyone who is catching covid is being reckless and I know that but many people who get reflective and want to say "see my warning" realize they could have made better choices, after the fact) . Sadly, there are going to be a lot more people who need examples like this or let the consequences of their decisions teach those lessons than those who are prudent. Most of the time(I have my moments) instead of being annoyed I am just grateful that common sense isn't a revelation to me and the point can be received without the consequence. Hopefully people are paying attention to the examples in front of them as they weigh their own decisions. Life ruining, barely surviving, going through hell lessons ain't for me whenever I can at least try to avoid it. You can't prevent everything but the cognizance to try to avoid pitfalls is a gift.
 
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BonBon

Well-Known Member
They are lucky to be in this position and I would do the same. This is a guinea pig situaiton.

Why the delay? The nations waiting to see how Covid vaccinations unfold​

Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan and Japan are among those that won’t start vaccinating for months, in part to see how other populations react to the jab


Australia’s prime minister, Scott Morrison,
Scott Morrison, the prime minister of Australia, is in no rush to vaccinate the population against Covid-19. Photograph: Mike Bowers/The Guardian

They are the nations that have been held up as shining examples of coronavirus management. In Australia, New Zealand and Taiwan, daily Covid infections are in the single digits and outbreaks are quickly tamped down.
But there is one area where these nations lag well behind the pack: the rollout of vaccines. Countries with some of the most enviable health care systems in the world – including Australia, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea – will not begin their vaccine roll-outs until the end of February or later.
The delay is deliberate. The millions of people already being vaccinated against Covid-19 will provide valuable data to those countries who have – for various reasons – decided to wait for more information about the vaccine, its efficacy and side effects before rolling it out to vulnerable populations and the public.
Australia’s health minister, Greg Hunt, said on Thursday Australia was proud to be part of this group of “the most successful countries in the world in dealing with” Covid-19, and that he would not be pressured to bring forward the roll-out.

‘Lots of double checking and re-examining’​

A significant driver of the expedited roll-out in some countries is the severity of their situations. The US registered a record 3,900 coronavirus deaths on Wednesday, with numbers surging in almost every state. On Thursday the UK’s death toll rose by 1,162, its second-highest increase since the pandemic began. The urgency for the vaccine in those countries is palpable, with hospitals and morgues struggling to manage the number of deceased, and health care workers who were burning out months ago.

Why would you put people at risk when if you wait a bit longer, you can get more information?
Jennifer Martin
By comparison, most Australian states and territories have had no local cases of the virus for months, while there has been no community transmission in New Zealand since 18 November.
Professor of clinical pharmacology Jennifer Martin is a physician in Australia who is also a member of the Pharmacology and Therapeutics Advisory Committee of PHARMAC, the sole purchaser for pharmaceuticals in New Zealand. She said people often asked her about the pace of the roll-out.
“The reason it’s such a prolonged approval process in Australia and New Zealand is because there is lots of double checking and reexamining of the statistics, because if we make an error, it will become an error on a big scale by the time the drug is rolled out across a large population,” Martin said.
“It’s not that uncommon that the regulator might look at the data and say, ‘Well, it looks OK in terms of how it works in European people, but we’re quite worried about how this might affect Indigenous people, and the Asian population seem to respond differently too’.
“Australia and New Zealand are saying; ‘Why would you put people at risk when if you wait a bit longer, you can get more information?’”
 

sunshinebeautiful

Well-Known Member
They are lucky to be in this position and I would do the same. This is a guinea pig situaiton.

Why the delay? The nations waiting to see how Covid vaccinations unfold​

Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan and Japan are among those that won’t start vaccinating for months, in part to see how other populations react to the jab


Australia’s prime minister, Scott Morrison,
Scott Morrison, the prime minister of Australia, is in no rush to vaccinate the population against Covid-19. Photograph: Mike Bowers/The Guardian

They are the nations that have been held up as shining examples of coronavirus management. In Australia, New Zealand and Taiwan, daily Covid infections are in the single digits and outbreaks are quickly tamped down.
But there is one area where these nations lag well behind the pack: the rollout of vaccines. Countries with some of the most enviable health care systems in the world – including Australia, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea – will not begin their vaccine roll-outs until the end of February or later.
The delay is deliberate. The millions of people already being vaccinated against Covid-19 will provide valuable data to those countries who have – for various reasons – decided to wait for more information about the vaccine, its efficacy and side effects before rolling it out to vulnerable populations and the public.
Australia’s health minister, Greg Hunt, said on Thursday Australia was proud to be part of this group of “the most successful countries in the world in dealing with” Covid-19, and that he would not be pressured to bring forward the roll-out.

‘Lots of double checking and re-examining’​

A significant driver of the expedited roll-out in some countries is the severity of their situations. The US registered a record 3,900 coronavirus deaths on Wednesday, with numbers surging in almost every state. On Thursday the UK’s death toll rose by 1,162, its second-highest increase since the pandemic began. The urgency for the vaccine in those countries is palpable, with hospitals and morgues struggling to manage the number of deceased, and health care workers who were burning out months ago.


By comparison, most Australian states and territories have had no local cases of the virus for months, while there has been no community transmission in New Zealand since 18 November.
Professor of clinical pharmacology Jennifer Martin is a physician in Australia who is also a member of the Pharmacology and Therapeutics Advisory Committee of PHARMAC, the sole purchaser for pharmaceuticals in New Zealand. She said people often asked her about the pace of the roll-out.
“The reason it’s such a prolonged approval process in Australia and New Zealand is because there is lots of double checking and reexamining of the statistics, because if we make an error, it will become an error on a big scale by the time the drug is rolled out across a large population,” Martin said.
“It’s not that uncommon that the regulator might look at the data and say, ‘Well, it looks OK in terms of how it
works in European people, but we’re quite worried about how this might affect Indigenous people, and the Asian population seem to respond differently too’.
“Australia and New Zealand are saying; ‘Why would you put people at risk when if you wait a bit longer, you can get more information?’”
They are definitely lucky that the virus is mostly under control over there
 

vevster

Well-Known Member
Can I wear this instead of a mask?


I just want to wear the mask over my mouth. My glasses fog up!
 

vevster

Well-Known Member
Not happy when I went to visit my relative whose's spouse passed they had 4 church folk in there. We all had on masks but I know the masks dont filter out the virus. We were face to face in a small room. 7 of us. Then they left and another guy came in. I ran out of there...

I know my immune system is protected, but I don't want to be exposed uneccesarily to people I don't know like that.
 
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PatDM'T

Well-Known Member
Can I wear this instead of a mask?


I just want to wear the mask over my mouth. My glasses fog up!
I don't see
why not.

Or even the
ones with a
vent and filters.

This does not
fog up my glasses.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
Can I wear this instead of a mask?


I just want to wear the mask over my mouth. My glasses fog up!
It's not a perfect solution but fog is minimized for me when I have the top part of the mask sit under my frames instead of it being just high enough to cover my nostrils.

That's a clever workaround though.
 
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