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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Thanks Ladies.

COVID-stuff: I'm at this hotel thanks to a family friend for a week. I think Hubby just wants to be near family. He has a 2nd cousin our age and they are as paranoid as we are with the masks, sanitizer, health prevention...double masking. But lordt...it IS Central FL and people here are reluctantly masking up. There is a Cornhole event (well 'was' over the weekend) and all the tru mpers are out. They wear the masks because the hotel demands it. The staff are double masked but these folks are big mad. They have lots of cleaning and sanitizing in place so that feels good. Hilton brand is on it. The stores here are on it.

non-COVID stuff: I'm limiting the social media discussion aspect and just keeping my mind busy with non-important things since my boss insists that I DO NOT WORK and even threatened my whole unit to not say anything work-related to me. I'm just looking at interior design stuff, planning/journaling and keeping the kids busy. I have enough on my plate. We have the little one doing Digital from the Hotel and its been a good day so far. Rather than have her take a week off, I think that was best. Her teacher knows and was excited to see her. Her friends asked "where she was at" and they were all ooohs and ahhhs about her being at a hotel. Hubby's college friends have driven far and wide and took off work just to see him and check in on him and the siblings. So they're hanging around until the funeral Saturday. So we're all good here. Mentally we are good...just taking time. I'm cleaning but thats therapeutic for me. I appreciate all you guys' well-wishes.
 

Ms. Tarabotti

Well-Known Member
Sigh
We lost my father in law today. We think he passed in his sleep early in the morning. My brother in law went to check on him and he heard him coughing, but he settled down and he went back to snoring. Hours later when he went to get his breakfast going and to wake him (they had therapy later for him) he noticed he was cold.
My father in law was very sick. We don't think its COVID-19 related. He didn't really go anywhere. In 2016 he'd had a stroke hours before he was to walk his daughter down the aisle, and had been stabilized, wheelchair bound but was wearing away. He lived a full life for sure, and was a Vietnam Veteran. My husband is broken hearted. My 7 yr old daughter had to interrupt me to tell me between weeping with a client who was going through the wildest, saddest crisis of her own, and calling my staff on site to get this family some help. My own father was absolutely confused at me screaming into the phone because he and my husband just got off the phone 20 minutes prior--and he told MY dad, that HIS dad was fine as of last night......Between the military and some super rich family friends who went down to the funeral home to pay for everything, everything is done. Friend didn't have to pay for anything. They have purchased us a stay at one of their really nice hotels. They lost their mother in 2018 a few weeks after had our last baby. She was sick herself trying to be her husband's caretaker. I believe that loss slowed down his recovery really bad. He loved her deeply. They were married 47 years. I'm hurting for my husband who now has no parents on earth. Hurting for baby brother in law who found him and had to deal with having him moved (took 2 hours for them to come, so the Fire Dept stayed with him) and having to deal with it. Hurting for my sister in law who was the oldest. Pray for us.
:bighug::sad:

I'm sorry to hear about your loss, It's always hard to lose a loved one but it's doubly hard during this pandemic. Condolences to your family.
 

Ms. Tarabotti

Well-Known Member


Rep. Ron Wright Dies After Battling COVID-19, Cancer​


Ryan Grenoble
·National Reporter, HuffPost
Mon, February 8, 2021, 11:05 AM


Rep. Ron Wright (R-Texas) at a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on March 13, 2019. Wright, who had lung cancer, died this week after being diagnosed with COVID-19 in late January. (Photo: Bill Clark via Getty Images)

Rep. Ron Wright (R-Texas) at a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on March 13, 2019. Wright, who had lung cancer, died this week after being diagnosed with COVID-19 in late January. (Photo: Bill Clark via Getty Images)

Rep. Ron Wright (R-Texas) died Sunday after battling COVID-19, his family confirmed to The Dallas Morning News on Monday.
Wright, 67, tested positive for COVID-19 in late January. He said in a statement at the time that he was experiencing “minor symptoms.”

The Texas Republican was also diagnosed with lung cancer in 2018, and was admitted to a Dallas hospital in September 2020 due to complications from his treatment.

“As friends, family, and many of his constituents will know, Ron maintained his quick wit and optimism until the very end,” the congressman’s office said in a statement. “Despite years of painful, sometimes debilitating treatment for cancer, Ron never lacked the desire to get up and go to work, to motivate those around him, or to offer fatherly advice.”


The statement notes that Wright’s wife, Susan, was hospitalized with COVID-19 two weeks ago.

Wright is the first sitting member of Congress to die after being diagnosed with COVID-19. Rep.-elect Luke Letlow (R-La.), 41, died of the disease in late December, days before he was set to be sworn in.
Wright was reelected to his seat in November 2020.

CORRECTION: Due to an editing error, a previous version of this article misstated when Wright was diagnosed with cancer. It was 2018, not 2019.
Related...
Texas Republican Says Women Should 'Absolutely' Be Jailed For Having An Abortion
Congressman-Elect Luke Letlow Dies Of COVID-19 Complications
It's Not Just You. A Lot Of Us Are Hitting A Pandemic Wall Right Now.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost and has been updated.

So is Covid still just a hoax? No need to wear masks, right?
 

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
It seems covid-19 will no longer be a male dominated disease because of the UK-strain


UK study finds new variant may be up to 70% more deadly​

CORONAVIRUS
by: The Associated Press, Nexstar Media Wire
Posted: Feb 15, 2021 / 05:29 AM EST / Updated: Feb 16, 2021 / 07:26 AM EST

Healthcare volunteer Melissa Lowry prepares a COVID-19 vaccine at a regional vaccination site, Monday, Feb. 1, 2021, in Wakefield, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

LONDON — U.K. government scientific advisers say the COVID-19 variant now predominant in the country may be up to 70% more deadly than previous variants, underscoring concerns about how mutations may change the characteristics of the disease.

The findings from the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group, published Friday on the government’s website, build on preliminary research released Jan. 21. The group includes experts from universities and public agencies across the U.K.

The new report is based on analysis of a dozen studies that found the so-called Kent variant, named after the county where it was first identified, is likely 30% to 70% more deadly than other variants.

The studies compared hospitalization and death rates among people infected with the variant and those infected with other variants.

The results of the analysis are worrisome, said Dr. David Strain, a clinical senior lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School and the clinical lead for COVID at the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital.

“The higher transmissibility means that people who were previously at low risk of catching COVID (particularly younger fitter females) are now catching it and ending up in hospital,″ Strain said. “This is highlighted by the latest figures for hospitalization that now suggest almost 50:50 male to female ratio compared to this being predominantly in men during the first wave.″
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member

‘Tomorrow. Tomorrow I’ll start to feel better.’​


Kaitlin Denis, on approaching Year Two of living with covid-19​

I caught this virus before anyone had even died in Illinois. That was like a century ago, right? Now we’re talking about Year Two, vaccines, new variants, a new administration, but for me it’s still exactly the same. I’m always in this bed. I’m always in this room. I’ve been sick for the last 330 days. I force myself to keep track because otherwise time doesn’t move. I feel like I’m in jail and putting tally marks on the wall.

I used to go to sleep thinking: Tomorrow. Tomorrow I’ll start to feel better. I don’t really do that as much anymore. I’m trying to come to terms with the fact that this virus isn’t something I’m about to get over. This might be it. Maybe this is who I am.

I wake up every morning, and I brace myself. What’s it going to be today? I’m what they call a “long-hauler,” where covid takes over your body and won’t go away. Doctors think there might be tens of thousands of us, but nobody really knows. It’s a medical mystery. It’s like a random grab bag of symptoms. You reach in, and you never know what you’re going to get. How about some nausea and severe dizziness? Or would you prefer a migraine with a side of joint pain? Some issues are constant, like body aches and head-to-toe fatigue, but the weirder ones seem to randomly come and go: ringing ears, sore ribs, heart palpitations, ear popping, numbness in my fingers, excessive mouth watering, lightheadedness, brain fog. My memory loss is so bad sometimes that it’s like I have amnesia. The other day, I woke up and wanted to put on running clothes. In my head, I thought I was going for a jog and then heading in to work, but as soon as I stood up, my heart rate started spiking, and it was like: Oh yeah. I can’t even walk around the block by myself. I don’t have a job anymore. I’m on disability. What am I thinking?

A lot of times I hardly get out of bed. The day never starts or the night never ends. It’s a black hole. I wait for the hours to pass.

I’ve withdrawn from pretty much everyone. I get the feeling sometimes that people think I’m being dramatic. I can’t really explain what’s happening to me, and neither can doctors. Some of them want to put me on antidepressants or send me to counseling because medically, none of this makes sense. I’m barely 30. I just got married. Ten years ago, I was playing Division I college soccer, and now I can’t go to the grocery store unless I ride around in one of those scooters. It’s like: Really? Really? It seems pathetic to people. It seems pathetic to me.

Covid was barely on my radar when I first got sick in early March. Nobody wore masks. Chicago hadn’t locked down yet. I got a headache and a sore throat, but I tried to gut through it. I work in finance, and it’s that Wall Street culture of hand-to-hand combat. You’re either at work or you’re on your deathbed, and that suits me. I’m competitive. My husband jokes that I have that killer mentality. I don’t like to slow down. I practically go crazy waiting in line at Starbucks behind people who don’t know what to order. “Seriously? Let’s go! The menu is always the same!” I like a fast pace. I kept working the usual long hours until my fever spiked, and then my husband started having symptoms, too. I called the Northwestern University covid hotline. They told me to go to the ER, but the ER said they didn’t have any tests. They told me to assume that I had it. They gave me painkillers and sent me home.

It was rough for both my husband and me. We needed a steroid inhaler to help with our breathing. We ordered tons of Gatorade, and we didn’t leave the apartment for the first 20 days. We’d argue about who had to get out of bed to feed the dogs. But then after a few weeks, my husband started to feel better. He was going for runs again. He said: “Come on. At least come for a walk with me.” I tried. I tried to fake my way through. You get sick and you’re supposed to get better. That’s what happens. There was no other possibility in my mind. I went back to working remotely, but I couldn’t focus. I was so tired that I’d lie in bed and move my mouse so it looked like my computer screen was active. I’ve had concussions playing soccer, and it was that same kind of fogginess where your mind drifts off and you just stare at the wall. There was so much pressure in my head that it felt like I was hanging upside down. I was making a ton of silly mistakes in my job. Sometimes, when I would place large trades over the phone, I would forget what I was doing in the middle of the call. I’d mix up the day of the week. I was like: “Okay. Something’s seriously wrong. Why am I not getting better?”

I’ve seen more doctors these last six months than I did for the first 30 years of my life. There’s hardly anybody that specializes in these symptoms yet. I have to be my own advocate, and it’s exhausting. I do my own research in covid forums online. I think I might have something called dysautonomia, where your brain stops telling the body how to do normal functions, but only a few doctors study that, and the wait-list for an appointment is more than two years. I managed to get in to see an internist in Chicago, but he sent me back to the emergency room, so that didn’t help. I found a rheumatologist, and she referred me to another rheumatologist, who sent me to a specialist out of state, and then he referred me to a cardiologist instead. I’m going around in circles looking for any kind of answer, but mostly it seems like they’re guessing. I’ve been told I might have Lyme disease, or something called POTS syndrome, or chronic fatigue, or fibromyalgia, or anxiety and depression. I have this big pillbox now, and a lot of the medications are still experimental, so we have to pay for them out of pocket. I take two antidepressants, vitamin D and a whole bunch of other stuff. My husband keeps track of the medications because it’s too much for me. He worked a connection to get me in to see a neuro-infectious-disease doctor. He assessed me and gave me a cognitive test, which I failed. He said 10 percent of people who get covid might end up having long-lasting neurological effects from this virus. He said: “It might be years before we fully understand it.”

If nobody knows what’s wrong, how do I get better? My vitals are usually normal. My lung scans look fine. My bloodwork turns out to be okay.

It sounds crazy, right? Am I crazy? I definitely have that psychological battle where I start to doubt everything. Could it all be in my head? I’ll tell myself I need to try harder. I’ll force myself out of bed, but then I get in the shower and the hot water turns my hands purple. My heart rate spikes. I get so dizzy I have to sit down.

I need help with everything. I can’t really drive. My husband and I moved out to the suburbs to be near my parents, and I have this great support system, but honestly, I feel like a burden. My husband is the full-time worker, full-time caretaker, full-time housekeeper. He’s been amazing, but we’re supposed to be starting our lives together, and now he has a little walkie-talkie to remind me about my medicine. He checks on me every hour, and meanwhile, I’m like this helpless 10-year-old just lounging in bed. The boredom is constant. I play some video games. I look online at house decor. One doctor told me arts and crafts could be a good way to keep my hands active, so that’s how I got through the holidays. On Halloween, I sat in bed and decorated paper pumpkins. I drew little scarecrows and taped them up on the wall. “Good work, Kaitlin! You’re using your brain. You should be so proud!”

It’s guilt. It’s anger and self-loathing. I have therapy once a week, and it helps. We’ve talked a lot about acceptance. I’m trying to accept that I’m not going to wake up one day feeling all better. I’m trying to let go of my expectations, but there’s grief in that. It feels like surrender.
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
How was it?
How do you feel?
I’m okay. Went back home and slept. I had to wait around for 15 minutes for observation. Very slight soreness at site of injection. Of the 60 or so staff that got it today only one c/o of a side effect. She just rang in sick and said she is dizzy because of the vaccine. But I don’t believe her. She is off sick 8 out of every 10 shifts.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member

‘Tomorrow. Tomorrow I’ll start to feel better.’​


Kaitlin Denis, on approaching Year Two of living with covid-19​

I caught this virus before anyone had even died in Illinois. That was like a century ago, right? Now we’re talking about Year Two, vaccines, new variants, a new administration, but for me it’s still exactly the same. I’m always in this bed. I’m always in this room. I’ve been sick for the last 330 days. I force myself to keep track because otherwise time doesn’t move. I feel like I’m in jail and putting tally marks on the wall.

I used to go to sleep thinking: Tomorrow. Tomorrow I’ll start to feel better. I don’t really do that as much anymore. I’m trying to come to terms with the fact that this virus isn’t something I’m about to get over. This might be it. Maybe this is who I am.

I wake up every morning, and I brace myself. What’s it going to be today? I’m what they call a “long-hauler,” where covid takes over your body and won’t go away. Doctors think there might be tens of thousands of us, but nobody really knows. It’s a medical mystery. It’s like a random grab bag of symptoms. You reach in, and you never know what you’re going to get. How about some nausea and severe dizziness? Or would you prefer a migraine with a side of joint pain? Some issues are constant, like body aches and head-to-toe fatigue, but the weirder ones seem to randomly come and go: ringing ears, sore ribs, heart palpitations, ear popping, numbness in my fingers, excessive mouth watering, lightheadedness, brain fog. My memory loss is so bad sometimes that it’s like I have amnesia. The other day, I woke up and wanted to put on running clothes. In my head, I thought I was going for a jog and then heading in to work, but as soon as I stood up, my heart rate started spiking, and it was like: Oh yeah. I can’t even walk around the block by myself. I don’t have a job anymore. I’m on disability. What am I thinking?

A lot of times I hardly get out of bed. The day never starts or the night never ends. It’s a black hole. I wait for the hours to pass.

I’ve withdrawn from pretty much everyone. I get the feeling sometimes that people think I’m being dramatic. I can’t really explain what’s happening to me, and neither can doctors. Some of them want to put me on antidepressants or send me to counseling because medically, none of this makes sense. I’m barely 30. I just got married. Ten years ago, I was playing Division I college soccer, and now I can’t go to the grocery store unless I ride around in one of those scooters. It’s like: Really? Really? It seems pathetic to people. It seems pathetic to me.

Covid was barely on my radar when I first got sick in early March. Nobody wore masks. Chicago hadn’t locked down yet. I got a headache and a sore throat, but I tried to gut through it. I work in finance, and it’s that Wall Street culture of hand-to-hand combat. You’re either at work or you’re on your deathbed, and that suits me. I’m competitive. My husband jokes that I have that killer mentality. I don’t like to slow down. I practically go crazy waiting in line at Starbucks behind people who don’t know what to order. “Seriously? Let’s go! The menu is always the same!” I like a fast pace. I kept working the usual long hours until my fever spiked, and then my husband started having symptoms, too. I called the Northwestern University covid hotline. They told me to go to the ER, but the ER said they didn’t have any tests. They told me to assume that I had it. They gave me painkillers and sent me home.

It was rough for both my husband and me. We needed a steroid inhaler to help with our breathing. We ordered tons of Gatorade, and we didn’t leave the apartment for the first 20 days. We’d argue about who had to get out of bed to feed the dogs. But then after a few weeks, my husband started to feel better. He was going for runs again. He said: “Come on. At least come for a walk with me.” I tried. I tried to fake my way through. You get sick and you’re supposed to get better. That’s what happens. There was no other possibility in my mind. I went back to working remotely, but I couldn’t focus. I was so tired that I’d lie in bed and move my mouse so it looked like my computer screen was active. I’ve had concussions playing soccer, and it was that same kind of fogginess where your mind drifts off and you just stare at the wall. There was so much pressure in my head that it felt like I was hanging upside down. I was making a ton of silly mistakes in my job. Sometimes, when I would place large trades over the phone, I would forget what I was doing in the middle of the call. I’d mix up the day of the week. I was like: “Okay. Something’s seriously wrong. Why am I not getting better?”

I’ve seen more doctors these last six months than I did for the first 30 years of my life. There’s hardly anybody that specializes in these symptoms yet. I have to be my own advocate, and it’s exhausting. I do my own research in covid forums online. I think I might have something called dysautonomia, where your brain stops telling the body how to do normal functions, but only a few doctors study that, and the wait-list for an appointment is more than two years. I managed to get in to see an internist in Chicago, but he sent me back to the emergency room, so that didn’t help. I found a rheumatologist, and she referred me to another rheumatologist, who sent me to a specialist out of state, and then he referred me to a cardiologist instead. I’m going around in circles looking for any kind of answer, but mostly it seems like they’re guessing. I’ve been told I might have Lyme disease, or something called POTS syndrome, or chronic fatigue, or fibromyalgia, or anxiety and depression. I have this big pillbox now, and a lot of the medications are still experimental, so we have to pay for them out of pocket. I take two antidepressants, vitamin D and a whole bunch of other stuff. My husband keeps track of the medications because it’s too much for me. He worked a connection to get me in to see a neuro-infectious-disease doctor. He assessed me and gave me a cognitive test, which I failed. He said 10 percent of people who get covid might end up having long-lasting neurological effects from this virus. He said: “It might be years before we fully understand it.”

If nobody knows what’s wrong, how do I get better? My vitals are usually normal. My lung scans look fine. My bloodwork turns out to be okay.

It sounds crazy, right? Am I crazy? I definitely have that psychological battle where I start to doubt everything. Could it all be in my head? I’ll tell myself I need to try harder. I’ll force myself out of bed, but then I get in the shower and the hot water turns my hands purple. My heart rate spikes. I get so dizzy I have to sit down.

I need help with everything. I can’t really drive. My husband and I moved out to the suburbs to be near my parents, and I have this great support system, but honestly, I feel like a burden. My husband is the full-time worker, full-time caretaker, full-time housekeeper. He’s been amazing, but we’re supposed to be starting our lives together, and now he has a little walkie-talkie to remind me about my medicine. He checks on me every hour, and meanwhile, I’m like this helpless 10-year-old just lounging in bed. The boredom is constant. I play some video games. I look online at house decor. One doctor told me arts and crafts could be a good way to keep my hands active, so that’s how I got through the holidays. On Halloween, I sat in bed and decorated paper pumpkins. I drew little scarecrows and taped them up on the wall. “Good work, Kaitlin! You’re using your brain. You should be so proud!”

It’s guilt. It’s anger and self-loathing. I have therapy once a week, and it helps. We’ve talked a lot about acceptance. I’m trying to accept that I’m not going to wake up one day feeling all better. I’m trying to let go of my expectations, but there’s grief in that. It feels like surrender.
This is super sad:

I’m barely 30. I just got married. Ten years ago, I was playing Division I college soccer, and now I can’t go to the grocery store unless I ride around in one of those scooters. It’s like: Really? Really? It seems pathetic to people. It seems pathetic to me.
 

awhyley

Well-Known Member
Force of Nature clears the air REALLY well. Thank you to the poster that mentioned it is good for AIR.
It is comforting knowing COVID is airbourne.
I regularly mist the inside of my car and other spaces... it isn't toxic like Lysol.....

Lysol is toxic???
 

PatDM'T

Well-Known Member
I now feel like I have been punched in my arm by Muhammad Ali. It’s painful to touch and swollen. And my waste products smell like sickness and medicine ...

Oh dear!
Sorry you're
in pain.

But you feel
OK otherwise?
Like no malaise
or fatigue?
 

starfish

Well-Known Member
I got my first Moderna vaccination in January, and it made me really sick. Fever, aches, chills, headache, nausea and fatigue. Like I had the flu. I was sick for three days then on the fourth day it was like nothing had ever happened. I felt fine. I just got my second shot last week, and I had a headache, incredible fatigue and I couldn't lift my arm at all. It was killing me. That was two days, then on the third day nothing. I was worried about the second dose because I heard people get sicker but this was a breeze compared to January. It all is worth it. I'm a hypochondriac so Rona has really stressed me out. I feel so much better. I still practice social distancing and double mask because they're not sure if you can still be infectious and spread it even after the vaccine. My parents have been vaccinated too. I am going to wait 2-3 weeks for my antibodies to kick in then I'm going to hug them forever. It's been a long time.

Disclaimer: I get a strong reaction to vaccines, when my immune system kicks in. I get sick after flu shots.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I got my first Moderna vaccination in January, and it made me really sick. Fever, aches, chills, headache, nausea and fatigue. Like I had the flu. I was sick for three days then on the fourth day it was like nothing had ever happened. I felt fine. I just got my second shot last week, and I had a headache, incredible fatigue and I couldn't lift my arm at all. It was killing me. That was two days, then on the third day nothing. I was worried about the second dose because I heard people get sicker but this was a breeze compared to January. It all is worth it. I'm a hypochondriac so Rona has really stressed me out. I feel so much better. I still practice social distancing and double mask because they're not sure if you can still be infectious and spread it even after the vaccine. My parents have been vaccinated too. I am going to wait 2-3 weeks for my antibodies to kick in then I'm going to hug them forever. It's been a long time.

Disclaimer: I get a strong reaction to vaccines, when my immune system kicks in. I get sick after flu shots.
I noticed Biden and his team at an event and they were all double-masked. The CDC came out with it as "recommendations" months ago, and I adopted the change in December. I'm glad to see he takes it serious. I'm seeing more in my community wear a cloth like cover over medical or N95 masks.
 

awhyley

Well-Known Member
I noticed Biden and his team at an event and they were all double-masked. The CDC came out with it as "recommendations" months ago, and I adopted the change in December. I'm glad to see he takes it serious. I'm seeing more in my community wear a cloth like cover over medical or N95 masks.

He's 78. Can't take any chances. Cases over here are rising again. Gonna adopt this approach.
 

starfish

Well-Known Member
I got my first Moderna vaccination in January, and it made me really sick. Fever, aches, chills, headache, nausea and fatigue. Like I had the flu. I was sick for three days then on the fourth day it was like nothing had ever happened. I felt fine. I just got my second shot last week, and I had a headache, incredible fatigue and I couldn't lift my arm at all. It was killing me. That was two days, then on the third day nothing. I was worried about the second dose because I heard people get sicker but this was a breeze compared to January. It all is worth it. I'm a hypochondriac so Rona has really stressed me out. I feel so much better. I still practice social distancing and double mask because they're not sure if you can still be infectious and spread it even after the vaccine. My parents have been vaccinated too. I am going to wait 2-3 weeks for my antibodies to kick in then I'm going to hug them forever. It's been a long time.

Disclaimer: I get a strong reaction to vaccines, when my immune system kicks in. I get sick after flu shots.
Update: Now it’s Monday 2/22 and I don’t feel good again. Not sick. Just under the weather. Not 100%. Called my PCP and she said it’s normal and to take it easy for the first week since I’ve a strong immune response. Maybe I shouldn’t have gone for that 6-mile walk yesterday smh.
 

winterinatl

All natural!
I got my second Pfizer shot on Saturday. I felt some mild fatigue and injection site soreness. That’s it. Makes me wonder if that means it’s less effective bc less response.
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
Do you know which vaccine you got? Do we have both of them in Ontario?
Pfizer. Pfizer and moderna are both available in Ontario. My facility chose Pfizer because it’s easier to store/transportation. Moderna has more restrictions in regards to storage during transportation (cannot remember exactly what).
 

snoop

Well-Known Member
Pfizer. Pfizer and moderna are both available in Ontario. My facility chose Pfizer because it’s easier to store/transportation. Moderna has more restrictions in regards to storage during transportation (cannot remember exactly what).
Oh! I thought it was the other way around. Good to know.

In either case, thanks for your response and I hope that you're feeling better now.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
^^^I'm on the fence with these things. I know people who have done Disney successfully but these were people who are pretty good with it. My poor kids are so couped up. They were at the church for the wake of my father in law mingling with family with masks on but they look like kids who hadn't been out in a while. The church was darn near empty and NOBODY acted like they were judging me.
The kids ain't been out in a while though. I just made sure they didn't break their necks climbing on things and told them to sit down. I wish I could take them to Disney or Six flags. We did pretty good at a hotel. We may do it again. IDK....maybe Legoland on like a Monday when its empty.
 

B_Phlyy

Pineapple Eating Unicorn
We have been vaccinating essential workers and the elderly since December. We had the Pfizer at first but it turns out it is cost prohibitive to store and transport so we've switched exclusively to Moderna. I decided to wait to see of any side effect from my coworkers. Everyone said the first dose was fine but the second dose put them out for a few days. Not too bad so I've decided to get it.

My first dose was last Friday. The injection itself went fine. They monitored me for 15 minutes and then I was able to go home. During my drive home, my shoulder and upper arm started hurting like crazy. Felt like someone hit it with a bag of bricks. The pain was present all weekend. I had to take a nap once I got home but I'm not sure if that was a vaccine reaction or me just being stressed and overworked. On Monday, I felt good as new.

I'm scheduled to receive the second dose on 3/12. Everyone said this is the one to prep for. Some say take Benadryl before and others Tylenol. 3 days of sickness seems to be the norm and then everything is back to normal. I'm going to ask for a few days off from work just in case.
 
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