• Forum Upgraded: https://longhaircareforum.com/threads/recent-forum-upgrade.849851/

The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

TrulyBlessed

Well-Known Member
I received dose 1 of the Pfizer vaccine yesterday. Symptoms have been injection site arm pain which is feeling much better now and about 28 hours later the low grade fever, muscle aches and headache has kicked in. My cycle started yesterday too so that could be a contributing factor. I’m just taking it easy with soups, fluids and rest. Will probably pop a Tylenol before bed. I react similarly to flu shots so I expected to have some side effects. Also, I felt slightly nauseous right after receiving the vaccine but that lasted no more than 20-30 minutes. My parents received the same vaccine a day before me and they’re feeling great.

Eta: 72 hours later I’m feeling good as new.
 
Last edited:

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
We are nearly 1/3 into 2021 and there is still no let up. I don’t watch the news and just concentrate on work and renovating my new home. I am really trying not to get sick again mentally. But last night during shift change I was updated by my coworkers after they started talking about the latest developments in Ontario and elsewhere. So i decided I needed to tune in to the news for one hour and I already feel depressed. Watching the protest of Daunte Wright on the news. So tired of this crap. A virus is threatening humanity’s very existence and they are still obsessed with killing black people. Never ending nightmare.

So I am reading that the vaccine may only give us 6 months protection? I’m glad I had the opportunity to get a vaccine other than JJ but the fact that it may only work for 6 months and it does not work against the new strains is really pissing me off due to the fact that there may already be unknown risks with the vaccines due to how rushed the development was. Now this. So I guess we will have to be taking COVID vaccines for the rest of our lives?!
 

Evolving78

Well-Known Member
I put my kids in golf and tennis for Spring because it is easy to social distance while playing.
It might be too late for tennis, but I will look into golf. I wanted to put my youngest in soccer, but it’s too much contact with others. My kids and I haven’t been around anyone, accept when I go to the store or accept deliveries.
But my main issue is the attitudes, the behavior of others that only think of themselves, and that’s not something I want to expose myself or my children to. I feel people that won’t fully lock down and allow this thing to die down are self-centered and dangerous.
like will the Tennis instructor practice social distancing when they leave the tennis court? I’m a woman one band, you may have others to fall back on if you or your children get sick, I don’t have that, so I have to be much more cautious than you.
 
Last edited:

snoop

Well-Known Member
We are nearly 1/3 into 2021 and there is still no let up. I don’t watch the news and just concentrate on work and renovating my new home. I am really trying not to get sick again mentally. But last night during shift change I was updated by my coworkers after they started talking about the latest developments in Ontario and elsewhere. So i decided I needed to tune in to the news for one hour and I already feel depressed. Watching the protest of Daunte Wright on the news. So tired of this crap. A virus is threatening humanity’s very existence and they are still obsessed with killing black people. Never ending nightmare.

So I am reading that the vaccine may only give us 6 months protection? I’m glad I had the opportunity to get a vaccine other than JJ but the fact that it may only work for 6 months and it does not work against the new strains is really pissing me off due to the fact that there may already be unknown risks with the vaccines due to how rushed the development was. Now this. So I guess we will have to be taking COVID vaccines for the rest of our lives?!

You are lucky that you got vaccinated. The rollout is so terrible (here in Ontario -- Golden Horseshoe) I don't know why they're even bothering. One pharmacist friend and his colleagues qualified for early vacs. They got their first dose. Their second dose has been postponed indefinitely.

Another person I know is high risk with a terminal illness. She has been sent notification that she can sign up to be notified of when she can sign up for the vaccine list.

Less than a week after they made teachers high priority, they shut the schools down.

I've heard the rumours that it lasts for around 6 months as well. At this rate our province will be on permanent lockdown.
 

sunshinebeautiful

Well-Known Member

“I Do Not Trust People in the Same Way and I Don’t Think I Ever Will Again”​

Workers are really, really not ready for offices to reopen​


I feel seen.

I know it's a privilege to be able to work from home all this time, but on multiple levels, I don't trust people and their foolishness. My job has me in contact with a lot of people every day, not just a few folks in the office. Hopefully folks will be vaccinated? Who knows? Add to that having been somewhat insulated from YT on-the-job foolishness all this time, and yeah, I'm not exactly raring to go back in.

Whew and this quote right here: "I do not trust people or institutions in the same way and I don’t think I ever will again. Even as we “go back to normal” (and since much of the world is not vaccinated, it is not even close to over yet) I will not forget how our societies treated vulnerable people and essential workers as expendable, minorities as scapegoats, facts and public health as suggestions or lies."

I'll continue to be double-masked up for a long while. Article below:

As COVID-19 vaccinations continue to run ahead of schedule, many workplaces that went fully remote last year are starting to set timelines for bringing people back to the office—and their employees are not happy.

As reopening initiatives gather steam, I’ve been flooded with letters from people viewing these plans with deep suspicion. Many of them are wondering whether they should even tell their employers once they’re vaccinated, since they fear that knowledge will be used to compel their return to work.

This person and her co-workers got vaccinated back in January but still fears returning:

My grandboss mentioned us going back a few weeks ago and I could almost immediately feel my panic response. I realized I haven’t been around anyone for more than two hours at a time in a year (except for three short occasions), I’m dreading having to wear a mask for multiple hours at work, I’m nervous to be back in spaces with lots of other people (even though I know our spaces are immaculately clean, we’ve still had a few positive cases). I don’t feel like me being there will do any good vs keeping my germs at home and away from people who are immunocompromised. It’s all so fraught and anxiety-inducing.

But bringing people back once they’re vaccinated has been the plan all along, as this manager points out:

I have felt like I am the one taking crazy pills the way some of our staff has reacted to my three-month warning that we will be reopening the office at the start of June. I am impressed we have held it together this long, but it has been a LOT of work and we just can’t afford to keep paying fees for missing things and losing time for development/training.

Part of the problem is one of timing. It’s one thing to plan on reopening in the late summer—Labor Day has been a popular target—but employers talking about bringing everyone back in May or June are ignoring that it’s unlikely we’ll have reached herd immunity by then (and kids definitely won’t be vaccinated yet, which is a concern for many parents).

Workers have also seen over the past year that even when employers claim they’ll implement safety measures, the reality is often very different. Social distancing requirements often go unenforced, and many people report colleagues going unmasked without any consequences. So employees are primed to be incredulous.

Plus, some people just prefer working from home and would rather not give it up. They’re quite happy to have no commute, a more flexible schedule, pets lounging nearby, more casual dress, and easy access to their own kitchen. A lot of us have even found we’re more productive at home, without the interruptions of chatty colleagues.

As COVID-19 vaccinations continue to run ahead of schedule, many workplaces that went fully remote last year are starting to set timelines for bringing people back to the office—and their employees are not happy.

As reopening initiatives gather steam, I’ve been flooded with letters from people viewing these plans with deep suspicion. Many of them are wondering whether they should even tell their employers once they’re vaccinated, since they fear that knowledge will be used to compel their return to work.

This person and her co-workers got vaccinated back in January but still fears returning:

My grandboss mentioned us going back a few weeks ago and I could almost immediately feel my panic response. I realized I haven’t been around anyone for more than two hours at a time in a year (except for three short occasions), I’m dreading having to wear a mask for multiple hours at work, I’m nervous to be back in spaces with lots of other people (even though I know our spaces are immaculately clean, we’ve still had a few positive cases). I don’t feel like me being there will do any good vs keeping my germs at home and away from people who are immunocompromised. It’s all so fraught and anxiety-inducing.

But bringing people back once they’re vaccinated has been the plan all along, as this manager points out:

I have felt like I am the one taking crazy pills the way some of our staff has reacted to my three-month warning that we will be reopening the office at the start of June. I am impressed we have held it together this long, but it has been a LOT of work and we just can’t afford to keep paying fees for missing things and losing time for development/training.

Part of the problem is one of timing. It’s one thing to plan on reopening in the late summer—Labor Day has been a popular target—but employers talking about bringing everyone back in May or June are ignoring that it’s unlikely we’ll have reached herd immunity by then (and kids definitely won’t be vaccinated yet, which is a concern for many parents).

Workers have also seen over the past year that even when employers claim they’ll implement safety measures, the reality is often very different. Social distancing requirements often go unenforced, and many people report colleagues going unmasked without any consequences. So employees are primed to be incredulous.

Plus, some people just prefer working from home and would rather not give it up. They’re quite happy to have no commute, a more flexible schedule, pets lounging nearby, more casual dress, and easy access to their own kitchen. A lot of us have even found we’re more productive at home, without the interruptions of chatty colleagues.

But the real problem, I suspect, is that in the past year, we’ve experienced a massive loss of trust in our institutions and in one another. After watching the government mislead and fail us on such a massive scale, with hundreds of thousands of people dying as a result of those failures, of course people are skeptical now. We’ve spent the past year not being protected by the institutions that were supposed to protect us and learning that we’d have to protect ourselves. So even at companies that have acted responsibly throughout the pandemic, employees are naturally anxious. When you’ve spent months watching businesses reopen while case numbers rose and governors giving that their blessing, as unsurprising new waves of infections followed, it’s pretty understandable to feel apprehensive of any new timelines for a return to “normalcy."

This person who wrote me speaks for a lot of others:

I do not trust people or institutions in the same way and I don’t think I ever will again. Even as we “go back to normal” (and since much of the world is not vaccinated, it is not even close to over yet) I will not forget how our societies treated vulnerable people and essential workers as expendable, minorities as scapegoats, facts and public health as suggestions or lies.

The world, frankly, just feels different now:

Even when things are as safe as possible, there’s a sense that we’ve been torn apart.
Maybe I was naive, but I always assumed in a crisis, we’d come together as a society and have each other’s back. It’s been over a year of being proven wrong about that over and over again. Knowing that the people I serve at work and the ones I run into in my life may or may not be willing to throw me overboard for their own personal benefit and comfort makes it hard to be around people.
I feel differently about how I view the world and how much I want to interact with it. And I need to work on that, but I think the impact of this will linger.

All of this is true despite the very good news around us—like the rapidly increasing vaccine supply and new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showing vaccinated people are unlikely to carry or spread the virus to others. For many people, that doesn’t change the reality that the past year has been a trauma, one that’s still unfolding. You can’t just turn that off when your office says it’s time to come back. (I also want to acknowledge the millions of people who won’t be “returning” to work because they’ve been working on site all along or have lost jobs that might not be coming back. In some ways, this anxiety about returning is the province of the privileged.)

So what can employers do? First and foremost, when possible, plan your reopening for further out than May or June. Think late summer or early fall. Give people plenty of notice, so they have time to get used to the idea, line up child care, and make any other arrangements. And consider a phased-in return: Rather than expecting workers to resume full-time on-site work overnight, bring people back for one or two days a week at first and then gradually increase that if it’s necessary. (It may not be! Many people have concluded that their jobs could be done most effectively with a hybrid setup, working from home some days and in the office others.) This person describes a system that worked well for her employer:

My facility has been closed to the public for basically a year. We did WFH for a while, then a mostly-WFH hybrid for the whole workforce, and then back into the still-closed-to-the-public office since the new year. We are just now opening up for limited programming, which I’ve had some surprising anxieties about even though I just got my second shot. Being able to ease back into things, and having things like mask guidelines, plexi barriers, and sanitizers everywhere has helped.
Coming back online a little bit at a time has allowed people to readjust. And it has given people with health concerns the flexibility to continue working from home, while letting those of us who feel able take care of the physical stuff that has to get done. I can’t imagine doing a year (or months) of WFH then returning to what is basically my pre-pandemic normal, just with masks on. If there is any way to make this a gentle transition, I think that would be the right call for everyone.

But employers should also recognize the significant break in trust between individuals and institutions, and know that won’t be repaired overnight. That doesn’t mean employers can’t bring people back when it’s truly safe to do so, but there’s going to be anxiety in their ranks for a long time—and the more they can be sensitive to and patient with that, the better reopenings are likely to go.

Full link: https://slate.com/human-interest/20...y-fear-mistrust.html?utm_source=pocket-newtab
 

Kanky

Well-Known Member
It might be too late for tennis, but I will look into golf. I wanted to put my youngest in soccer, but it’s too much contact with others. My kids and I haven’t been around anyone, accept when I go to the store or accept deliveries.
But my main issue is the attitudes, the behavior of others that only think of themselves, and that’s not something I want to expose myself or my children to. I feel people that won’t fully lock down and allow this thing to die down are self-centered and dangerous.
like will the Tennis instructor practice social distancing when they leave the tennis court? I’m a woman one band, you may have others to fall back on if you or your children get sick, I don’t have that, so I have to be much more cautious than you.
The instructors wear masks the entire time and the rules are that the kids and parents must wear them unless they are six feet apart from others. Most of the time they are at least that far apart and Covid is harder to catch outdoors. Soccer was a no go for me for the same reason.

I understand the caution because I had a hard time with this. We haven’t seen anyone indoors since this mess started. It is difficult to balance the kids need for social interaction and exercise with safety.
 

Peppermynt

Defying Gravity
These quotes really stood out to me:

But the real problem, I suspect, is that in the past year, we’ve experienced a massive loss of trust in our institutions and in one another. After watching the government mislead and fail us on such a massive scale, with hundreds of thousands of people dying as a result of those failures, of course people are skeptical now. We’ve spent the past year not being protected by the institutions that were supposed to protect us and learning that we’d have to protect ourselves. So even at companies that have acted responsibly throughout the pandemic, employees are naturally anxious. When you’ve spent months watching businesses reopen while case numbers rose and governors giving that their blessing, as unsurprising new waves of infections followed, it’s pretty understandable to feel apprehensive of any new timelines for a return to “normalcy."

and

Even when things are as safe as possible, there’s a sense that we’ve been torn apart.
Maybe I was naive, but I always assumed in a crisis, we’d come together as a society and have each other’s back. It’s been over a year of being proven wrong about that over and over again. Knowing that the people I serve at work and the ones I run into in my life may or may not be willing to throw me overboard for their own personal benefit and comfort makes it hard to be around people.
I feel differently about how I view the world and how much I want to interact with it. And I need to work on that, but I think the impact of this will linger.

I'm an introvert to begin with so I naturally don't want to be around y'all for any more time than absolutely necessary :giggle: but it didn't feel like life or death.

Maybe its my age but I no longer have any illusions about how ruthless most people are. Between the loss of 95% of any trust in the police (my dad was a retired Philly cop so I grew up feeling relatively safe around them - especially since my car had his FOP - fraternal order of police tags on it :look: and even after his death my mom's car still has his FOP tags), and a feeling the government (republicans primarily) couldn't care less about black people and blatantly, proudly show it now makes me really miss those naive days.

More and more I want to leave the U.S. (retire in 2020 and travel was the original plan, but 2020 had different ideas) but given the state of affairs where would I go? And I know I have a modicum of privilege compared to a huge percentage of the rest of the world so I try to be grateful for what I've been given, but sometimes I really feel defeated overall. :cry3:
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
You are lucky that you got vaccinated. The rollout is so terrible (here in Ontario -- Golden Horseshoe) I don't know why they're even bothering. One pharmacist friend and his colleagues qualified for early vacs. They got their first dose. Their second dose has been postponed indefinitely.

Another person I know is high risk with a terminal illness. She has been sent notification that she can sign up to be notified of when she can sign up for the vaccine list.

Less than a week after they made teachers high priority, they shut the schools down.

I've heard the rumours that it lasts for around 6 months as well. At this rate our province will be on permanent lockdown.
I only got one dose too. Only because I am a nurse. I cannot believe they closed the schools. i don’t know how parents are coping.
 

snoop

Well-Known Member
I only got one dose too. Only because I am a nurse. I cannot believe they closed the schools. i don’t know how parents are coping.

I hope that they keep your schedule and that you get your full dose on time. I have a nurse acquaintance who managed to get fully vaccinated before they really started to stretch the timelines out. You guys really should be prioritized.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I had a temp start working today. I spoke with her yesterday to give directions and let her know that the company complies with all state issued covid guidelines and let her know that she couldn't enter the building without a mask on. She came in this morning with a mask on and I showed her to her cubicle and told her to get situated and I'd come back to show her around. I get a call 2 minutes later that the temp is out there with no mask on. Apparently, she's been unemployed for most of the pandemic and didn't know that she needed to wear a mask all day except for eating and drinking breaks. Her first hour was spent with preventing Covid in the office training but the gag is after it was done she told me she knew all that yet the first thing she did was take her mask off when people were walking through her space with masks on. What is that? I also gave her a disposable mask since the cloth one she wore kept slipping down her nose. We will see how tomorrow goes.
 

snoop

Well-Known Member

One side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine could be a heavier period​


Katharine Lee got her COVID-19 vaccination early on in the United States’ rollout. So did a friend of hers — they got their shots on the same day. They compared notes, curious to see what the side effects would be. Lee, a research fellow in the Division of Public Health Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, says that they both had one surprising symptom: they both started their period soon after they took the vaccine.

“It wasn’t a symptom that was on the list,” she says. “I expected that my arm would be sore, or that I might have a fever or a headache, but this just wasn’t on the list.”

Lee reached out to Kate Clancy, who studies the menstrual cycle at the University of Illinois, to share the observation. When Clancy got her vaccination, she also had an unusual period. So she posted on Twitter asking if other people did, too — and watched dozens of responses roll in.

“It made us want to capture those experiences,” Lee says. So this week, the pair launched a formal study to collect data about the relationship between the COVID-19 vaccines and the menstrual cycle. It’s not a side effect that clinical trials checked for, and it’s not included on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s vaccine health check-in.


Full article here
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
This lady who has a prolapsed uterus was told her whole uterus would have to fall out before they will operate because of Covid. I shuddered. Poor woman. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-...ick-sherrie-hudson-woodstock-uterus-1.5983688


I know someone who as a trach and her throat needs stretching and they keep cancelling her appointment (over a year now) and now she can barely swallow her food. I feel so bad for so many people in these dire situations.
 

TrulyBlessed

Well-Known Member

Pfizer CEO says third Covid vaccine dose likely needed within 12 months​

Published Thu, Apr 15 2021 1:23 PM EDT
Updated Thu, Apr 15 2021 3:13 PM EDT
GP: Albert Bourla Joe Biden Pfizer Kalamazoo 210219

President Joe Biden listens to Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla speak at the Pfizer Kalamazoo Manufacturing Site February 19, 2021, in Portage, Michigan.

Brendan Smialowski | AFP | Getty Images

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said people will "likely" need a booster dose of a Covid-19vaccine within 12 months of getting fully vaccinated. His comments were made public Thursday but were taped April 1.
Bourla said it's possible people will need to get vaccinated against the coronavirus annually.
"A likely scenario is that there will be likely a need for a third dose, somewhere between six and 12 months and then from there, there will be an annual revaccination, but all of that needs to be confirmed. And again, the variants will play a key role," he told CNBC's Bertha Coombs during an event with CVS Health.
"It is extremely important to suppress the pool of people that can be susceptible to the virus," Bourla said.
The comment comes after Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky told CNBC in February that people may need to get vaccinated against Covid-19 annually, just like seasonal flu shots.
Researchers still don't know how long protection against the virus lasts once someone has been fully vaccinated.
Pfizer said earlier this month that its Covid-19 vaccine was more than 91% effective at protecting against the coronavirus and more than 95% effective against severe disease up to six months after the second dose. Moderna's vaccine, which uses technology similar to Pfizer's, was also shown to be highly effective at six months.
Pfizer's data was based on more than 12,000 vaccinated participants. However, researchers say more data is still needed to determine whether protection lasts after six months.

Earlier Thursday, the Biden administration's Covid response chief science officer, David Kessler, said Americans should expect to receive booster shots to protect against coronavirus variants.
Kessler told U.S. lawmakers that currently authorized vaccines are highly protective but noted new variants could "challenge" the effectiveness of the shots.
"We don't know everything at this moment," he told the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis.
"We are studying the durability of the antibody response," he said. "It seems strong but there is some waning of that and no doubt the variants challenge ... they make these vaccines work harder. So I think for planning purposes, planning purposes only, I think we should expect that we may have to boost."
In February, Pfizer and BioNTech said they were testing a third dose of their Covid-19 vaccine to better understand the immune response against new variants of the virus.
Late last month, the National Institutes of Health started testing a new Covid vaccine from Moderna in addition to the one it already has, designed to protect against a problematic variant first found in South Africa.
Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel told CNBC on Wednesday that the company hopes to have a booster shot for its two-dose vaccine available in the fall.

 

Rastafarai

Well-Known Member

Pfizer CEO says third Covid vaccine dose likely needed within 12 months​

Published Thu, Apr 15 2021 1:23 PM EDT
Updated Thu, Apr 15 2021 3:13 PM EDT
GP: Albert Bourla Joe Biden Pfizer Kalamazoo 210219

President Joe Biden listens to Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla speak at the Pfizer Kalamazoo Manufacturing Site February 19, 2021, in Portage, Michigan.

Brendan Smialowski | AFP | Getty Images

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said people will "likely" need a booster dose of a Covid-19vaccine within 12 months of getting fully vaccinated. His comments were made public Thursday but were taped April 1.
Bourla said it's possible people will need to get vaccinated against the coronavirus annually.
"A likely scenario is that there will be likely a need for a third dose, somewhere between six and 12 months and then from there, there will be an annual revaccination, but all of that needs to be confirmed. And again, the variants will play a key role," he told CNBC's Bertha Coombs during an event with CVS Health.
"It is extremely important to suppress the pool of people that can be susceptible to the virus," Bourla said.
The comment comes after Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky told CNBC in February that people may need to get vaccinated against Covid-19 annually, just like seasonal flu shots.
Researchers still don't know how long protection against the virus lasts once someone has been fully vaccinated.
Pfizer said earlier this month that its Covid-19 vaccine was more than 91% effective at protecting against the coronavirus and more than 95% effective against severe disease up to six months after the second dose. Moderna's vaccine, which uses technology similar to Pfizer's, was also shown to be highly effective at six months.
Pfizer's data was based on more than 12,000 vaccinated participants. However, researchers say more data is still needed to determine whether protection lasts after six months.

Earlier Thursday, the Biden administration's Covid response chief science officer, David Kessler, said Americans should expect to receive booster shots to protect against coronavirus variants.
Kessler told U.S. lawmakers that currently authorized vaccines are highly protective but noted new variants could "challenge" the effectiveness of the shots.
"We don't know everything at this moment," he told the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis.
"We are studying the durability of the antibody response," he said. "It seems strong but there is some waning of that and no doubt the variants challenge ... they make these vaccines work harder. So I think for planning purposes, planning purposes only, I think we should expect that we may have to boost."
In February, Pfizer and BioNTech said they were testing a third dose of their Covid-19 vaccine to better understand the immune response against new variants of the virus.
Late last month, the National Institutes of Health started testing a new Covid vaccine from Moderna in addition to the one it already has, designed to protect against a problematic variant first found in South Africa.
Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel told CNBC on Wednesday that the company hopes to have a booster shot for its two-dose vaccine available in the fall.


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

So now its 3 shots needed if taking Pfizer. Next it will be 5. After that, they will need two fingers and two toes. I'm telling ya'll - we are the guinea pigs.
 
Last edited:

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

So now its 3 shots needed if taking Pfizer. Next it will be 5. After that, they will need two fingers and two toes. I'm telling ya'll - we are the guinea pigs.
The adults in the room told us what to do a year ago to avoid the high infection and mutation rate. But wearing a mask and staying out of each other’s faces was too much like right, so here we are with a vaccine that now needs to fight the original virus and all subsequent mutations.

I’ve spent the last couple of days asking people if armed with the knowledge they have today, would they have done things differently even if it saved peoples lives and the overwhelming answer is no.

As a collective, we reap what we sow. It took a year to usher in creating a guinea pig situation all over the world.
 

Rastafarai

Well-Known Member
The adults in the room told us what to do a year ago to avoid the high infection and mutation rate. But wearing a mask and staying out of each other’s faces was too much like right, so here we are with a vaccine that now needs to fight the original virus and all subsequent mutations.

I’ve spent the last couple of days asking people if armed with the knowledge they have today, would they have done things differently even if it saved peoples lives and the overwhelming answer is no.

As a collective, we reap what we sow. It took a year to usher in creating a guinea pig situation all over the world.

Now they're saying it will likely be a yearly requirement, similar to the flu shot. The "adults" in the room can't seem to make up their minds.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
Now they're saying it will likely be a yearly requirement, similar to the flu shot. The "adults" in the room can't seem to make up their minds.
I don't know what part of they told us what to do a year ago to avoid the situation we are in today isn't clicking. This comes down to a basic math problem:

Mask compliance + social distancing + shutdowns = little to no need for shots

Masks optional + running to breathe on each other + optional shutdowns = need all the shots

The children in the room keep doing what they want and wondering why the hole they refuse to stop digging keeps getting wider and deeper.
 
Top