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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
 

Evolving78

Well-Known Member

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
This is interesting. My PCP's policy on appointments is so strict I assumed he was vaccinated. I'm confident at a minimum he's tested regularly if he's not vaccinated but I plan to ask soon. They won't even open the door to let you in if you don't have proof of vaccination or a recent negative covid test performed by their office.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I already know my kid's PCP is vaccinated and they don't even accept non-vaccinated children. My kid's daycare doesn't accept non-vaccinated children OR waivers (its private). When ppl ask if my kid's Peds office is good, I tell them, they are excellent and in high demand. But I tell them straight up if you are considering not vaccinating, you will need to go elsewhere. They will spread them out to a point.

I will ask my own new PCP if she is vaccinated. I see my OB more and I already know she and most of her staff are.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
This is interesting. My PCP's policy on appointments is so strict I assumed he was vaccinated. I'm confident at a minimum he's tested regularly if he's not vaccinated but I plan to ask soon. They won't even open the door to let you in if you don't have proof of vaccination or a recent negative covid test performed by their office.
Our offices here (IN FLORIDA) don't require a vaccine or negative test but they DO require a mask even though the mandates are removed.
 

lavaflow99

In search of the next vacation

My hospital system (MedStar) reports 80% of their workforce is vaccinated is growing. So it will be easy to mandate it and relieve folks of their positions if they choose not to be vaccinated.

Healthcare positions should be mandatory. We are around vulnerable patients and the last thing an already sick person with a weakened immune system needs is to be exposed to an unvaccinated infected employee. That is sacrilege and goes against the oath to do no harm.

Careers that have less person interaction and don’t involve taking care of the health of another individual makes sense if there is no mandate and is understandable. Though I won’t be mad if other businesses do for their bottom line

Once the FDA fully approves Pfizer and Moderna, the mandate flood gates are going to open. So buckle up folks!
 

lavaflow99

In search of the next vacation


In first federal ruling on vaccine mandates, judge sides with Houston hospital, dismissing claims from staff resisters​

HOUSTON – In the first federal ruling on vaccine mandates, a Houston judge Saturday dismissed a lawsuit by hospital employees who declined the COVID-19 shot – a decision that could have a ripple effect across the nation.

The case involved Houston Methodist, which was the first hospital system in the country to require that all its employees get vaccinated. U.S. District Judge Lynn N. Hughes said federal law does not prevent employers from issuing that mandate.

After months of warnings, Houston Methodist had put more than 170 of its 26,000 employees on unpaid suspension Monday. They were told they would be fired it they weren't vaccinated by June 21.

The hospital already had made it clear it means what it says: It fired the director of corporate risk – Bob Nevens – and another manager in April when they did not meet the earlier deadline for bosses.


In recent weeks, a few other major hospitals have followed Houston Methodist's lead, including the University of Pennsylvania, University of Louisville, New York Presbyterian and several major hospitals in the Washington, D.C. area.

Houston Methodist's CEO Marc Boom predicts more hospitals soon will join the effort. Many hospitals and employers were waiting for legal clarification before acting.

“We can now put this behind us and continue our focus on unparalleled safety, quality, service and innovation," Boom said after the ruling. "Our employees and physicians made their decisions for our patients, who are always at the center of everything we do."


The lawsuit was filed by 117 workers led by Jennifer Bridges, a nurse at Houston Methodist's Baytown hospital who declined the vaccine because she considers it experimental and dangerous. The judge disagreed, writing: "This claim is false, and it is also irrelevant."

Jennifer Bridges, a nurse at Houston Methodist Hospital, is among 178 workers suspended for refusing to get vaccinated.


Learning of the dismissal from USA TODAY, Bridges vowed not to give up. She has initiated a change.org petition that as of Saturday had drawn more than 9,000 signatures and a GoFundMe to pay for the lawsuit that has raised $130,000.

"This doesn't surprise me," she said

“Methodist is a very large company and they are pretty well protected in a lot of areas. We knew this was going to be a huge fight and we are prepared to fight it."
The lawsuit claimed that federal law prohibits employees from being required to get vaccinated without full U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of the vaccines. Currently, the FDA has authorized the Moderna, Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson vaccines under a special provision for emergencies.

The judge dismissed this argument as well, saying that law does not apply to private employers. He also dismissed an argument that anyone who gets the vaccine is effectively a human subject in an experimental trial.

“The hospital's employees are not participants in a human trial," he wrote. "They are licensed doctors, nurses, medical technician, and staff members. The hospital has not applied to test the COVID-19 vaccines on its employees."

The lawsuit originally was filed in Texas state court but was moved to federal court at Houston Methodist's request. The federal judge ruled Saturday that Texas state law only protects workers from being fired if they are forced to commit a crime.
 

january noir

Sunny On a Cloudy Day
^^^ I'm torn. I respect their right not to be vaccinated, but I also think that if you are a healthcare worker in close proximity to sick and contaminated individuals from a highly contagious virus, you should be vaccinated or at least work where you cannot become a threat to others. They'd have to be covered with PPE their entire shift just like before vaccines were available. Are they willing to do that at least? I only skimmed the article. Did it say what their options are?
 

lavaflow99

In search of the next vacation
^^^ I'm torn. I respect their right not to be vaccinated, but I also think that if you are a healthcare worker in close proximity to sick and contaminated individuals from a highly contagious virus, you should be vaccinated or at least work where you cannot become a threat to others. They'd have to be covered with PPE their entire shift just like before vaccines were available. Are they willing to do that at least? I only skimmed the article. Did it say what their options are?

Full PPE these days is reserved for going into patient rooms of confirmed COVID positive patients. Now it's only surgical masks and maybe eye protection when we go into regular patient rooms.

If all health care providers are vaccinated, then that will minimized the use of N95 masks unnecessarily. And I can see hospitals see this as a cost efficient move. PPE shortages were real early in the pandemic!

The only options presented in the article by the hospital are be vaccinated or get fired.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I didn't know this bit of disgusting virus history.

Weighing the risks, on February 5th of 1777, George Washington finally committed to the unpopular policy of mass small pox inoculation by writing to inform Congress of his plan. Throughout February, Washington, with no precedent for the operation he was about to undertake, covertly communicated to his commanding officers orders to oversee mass inoculations of their troops in the model of Morristown and Philadelphia (Dr. Shippen's Hospital). At least eleven hospitals had been constructed by the year's end.
George Washington and the First Mass Military Inoculation (John W. Kluge Center, Library of Congress) (loc.gov)

The process was simple. A physician lanced one of the infected patient’s pustules with a knife or scalpel and then inserted the infected blade under the skin of a healthy person. Generally the inoculated person contracted the disease, but in a much milder form.
Washington Inoculates an Army | American Battlefield Trust (battlefields.org)
 

Lylddlebit

Well-Known Member
They are doubling down that folks actually want to be around them huh? lol. I tell ya I am not tripping about folks shouting from the rooftops vaxxed versus not vaxxed...masked versus not masked...invited versus not invited...when, the large majority of folks aren't worth the effort to be around when it would be an inconvenience let alone a danger. Carry on...
 
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naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member


In first federal ruling on vaccine mandates, judge sides with Houston hospital, dismissing claims from staff resisters​

HOUSTON – In the first federal ruling on vaccine mandates, a Houston judge Saturday dismissed a lawsuit by hospital employees who declined the COVID-19 shot – a decision that could have a ripple effect across the nation.

The case involved Houston Methodist, which was the first hospital system in the country to require that all its employees get vaccinated. U.S. District Judge Lynn N. Hughes said federal law does not prevent employers from issuing that mandate.

After months of warnings, Houston Methodist had put more than 170 of its 26,000 employees on unpaid suspension Monday. They were told they would be fired it they weren't vaccinated by June 21.

The hospital already had made it clear it means what it says: It fired the director of corporate risk – Bob Nevens – and another manager in April when they did not meet the earlier deadline for bosses.


In recent weeks, a few other major hospitals have followed Houston Methodist's lead, including the University of Pennsylvania, University of Louisville, New York Presbyterian and several major hospitals in the Washington, D.C. area.

Houston Methodist's CEO Marc Boom predicts more hospitals soon will join the effort. Many hospitals and employers were waiting for legal clarification before acting.

“We can now put this behind us and continue our focus on unparalleled safety, quality, service and innovation," Boom said after the ruling. "Our employees and physicians made their decisions for our patients, who are always at the center of everything we do."


The lawsuit was filed by 117 workers led by Jennifer Bridges, a nurse at Houston Methodist's Baytown hospital who declined the vaccine because she considers it experimental and dangerous. The judge disagreed, writing: "This claim is false, and it is also irrelevant."

Jennifer Bridges, a nurse at Houston Methodist Hospital, is among 178 workers suspended for refusing to get vaccinated.


Learning of the dismissal from USA TODAY, Bridges vowed not to give up. She has initiated a change.org petition that as of Saturday had drawn more than 9,000 signatures and a GoFundMe to pay for the lawsuit that has raised $130,000.

"This doesn't surprise me," she said

“Methodist is a very large company and they are pretty well protected in a lot of areas. We knew this was going to be a huge fight and we are prepared to fight it."
The lawsuit claimed that federal law prohibits employees from being required to get vaccinated without full U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of the vaccines. Currently, the FDA has authorized the Moderna, Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson vaccines under a special provision for emergencies.

The judge dismissed this argument as well, saying that law does not apply to private employers. He also dismissed an argument that anyone who gets the vaccine is effectively a human subject in an experimental trial.

“The hospital's employees are not participants in a human trial," he wrote. "They are licensed doctors, nurses, medical technician, and staff members. The hospital has not applied to test the COVID-19 vaccines on its employees."

The lawsuit originally was filed in Texas state court but was moved to federal court at Houston Methodist's request. The federal judge ruled Saturday that Texas state law only protects workers from being fired if they are forced to commit a crime.
They still have a right to not be vaccinated. They just have to find a job that doesn't require it.

INSTALAWYERS were fighting online last week talmbout "they gone sue."

Okay.

And Trump supporters are laughable. Ya'll hitched ya'll wagon to pro-capitalist policy makers and policies. What you think they gonna do? Businesses are people now and can make their own decisions.

And please don't worry about a nursing and health care worker shortage. If you are following my hiring woes post in the Career section, you'll see I discuss that they've been pulling RNs from the Philippines here in FL for the better part of a year. Ain't gone be no shortage. Keep playing games.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I didn't know this bit of disgusting virus history.

Weighing the risks, on February 5th of 1777, George Washington finally committed to the unpopular policy of mass small pox inoculation by writing to inform Congress of his plan. Throughout February, Washington, with no precedent for the operation he was about to undertake, covertly communicated to his commanding officers orders to oversee mass inoculations of their troops in the model of Morristown and Philadelphia (Dr. Shippen's Hospital). At least eleven hospitals had been constructed by the year's end.
George Washington and the First Mass Military Inoculation (John W. Kluge Center, Library of Congress) (loc.gov)

The process was simple. A physician lanced one of the infected patient’s pustules with a knife or scalpel and then inserted the infected blade under the skin of a healthy person. Generally the inoculated person contracted the disease, but in a much milder form.
Washington Inoculates an Army | American Battlefield Trust (battlefields.org)
I mentioned this in another thread. It was so nasty.

 

Evolving78

Well-Known Member
They still have a right to not be vaccinated. They just have to find a job that doesn't require it.

INSTALAWYERS were fighting online last week talmbout "they gone sue."

Okay.

And Trump supporters are laughable. Ya'll hitched ya'll wagon to pro-capitalist policy makers and policies. What you think they gonna do? Businesses are people now and can make their own decisions.

And please don't worry about a nursing and health care worker shortage. If you are following my hiring woes post in the Career section, you'll see I discuss that they've been pulling RNs from the Philippines here in FL for the better part of a year. Ain't gone be no shortage. Keep playing games.
I saw it for myself when I went to the hospital. It was like out of an apocalyptic movie! No supplies, clinical staffing shortages, etc.. I don’t understand why people are not getting it?!?? The government decided if you don’t get this shot, you are on your own. This is all the help we are gonna get.
 

BrownBetty

Well-Known Member
My sister was
walking into Ross
with a mask on.
Some white guy
beaming called
out to her,
"You don't need
to wear a mask
anymore..."
and as if this
underscores it,
he added,
"...Trump said so!"

I'ma need Bugs
to fix this STAT

View attachment 472961

I was out the other day and some white man said something similar to my friend sans the trump part. I wish I would of heard him cause the cussing he would of received phew.
It cost nothing to mind your business. If you don't want to wear a mask that is on you why are you worried about what I do with my face? I wear a mask indoors and outdoors where there are crowds.

I know some folks who refuse to get the vaccine that's on them. I am not arguing with you about your choice BUT I am making decisions about our relationship based on your choice. We are not doing anything indoors, I am not eating out with you, just to name a couple of things.

I know folks have dropped off on testing. I watch the postivity rate, the hospitalizations, and the death rates just to get a sense of what is happening in the streets.

I've eaten at restaurants, all outdoors. I'm not comfortable doing much else. I would love a outdoor day party though.
 
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