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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I hate that Nikki Minaj jumped into this discussion. Now she is playing victim.

I would never tell people that the vaccine is the FIX or the shield. But she is talking about her "cousin's friend" as if she can verify this is what happened for real. She needs to understand that in a public sphere of influence, you need to verify what you hear.
I hate that she's playing dumb or is actually dumb enough to act like people are paying more attention to "do your own research" statement as opposed to the giant testicle old wives tale she told.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I’m getting tired of some black women getting angry at other black women who have expressed disappointment and anger at Nicki’s irresponsible statements by saying that we are not “protecting black women”.

Ok…so does protecting black women now mean going along with anything that comes out of someone’s mouth even if it’s ignorant, as long as it is said by a black woman :confused:. One could argue that pushing back on Nicki’s statements is what is actually protecting black women!!

I don’t agree with people attacking her by calling her a coon or Uncle Thomasina because some of those folks calling her names making her 20+ million followers angry or disengaged could really use that opportunity to try to reach some of them who are willing to listen and offer up facts and clear up misconceptions.
The bolded is why I'm like naw, this nonsense cannot stand unchallenged. What's extra crazy is whether cousins friend and his STD ridden balls really exists or not, Nicki put whatever was left of her credibility on the line in the name of testicles. Not even women's fertility or health but some jilted dude with swollen nuts.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I just got the call that my antivax, hotep adjacent, rapper, nephew with 8 kids who apparently distrusts vaccinations as much as he distrusts condoms got the Rona as well as his gf. He been running from state to state doing club promotions so I figured it was only a matter of time. He has visited multiple elderly but thankfully vaccinated relatives in the last 2 weeks. Don't nobody listen to me when I tell them not to let these fools in they house but I digress.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I think it is a given that vaccines alone won’t stop Covid, since Israel generally has been like Florida - everything opened without masks or social distancing - the minute they had a majority of eligible people vaccinated. Why is this even a question? If the numbers were looking bad in Israel already, just wait until the post-Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur numbers come in. Those holidays marked the beginning of the second wave in New York City last fall.
You ain't said nothing but a word. The Orthodox everywhere they can be found will not use electricity on the High Holy Days which means in person services only. They will pack themselves inside or outside a venue like little circumcised sardines and breathe all over each other.

This is a gathering outside in Australia last month, a year and change deep into a pandemic. Even though it's outside, how safe does this look? This isn't even for a holiday. Multiply this time everywhere Orthodox are in the world and the outbreak rules write themselves. Meanwhile, yesterday I was watching services from the comfort of my bed live and direct on the Tube of You.

 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
Every morning when I settle in with my coffee I go directly to the Herman Caine Awards on the Reddits because there's always new entries and this "be careful what you ask for " cautionary tale had me smdh. Remember how I said I don't know why I keep trying to understand stupid but I would really REALLY love to see the research that told her Covid was like food poisoning. I mean cuz obviously she got that very specific comparison between the outcome of eating bad fajitas and death by lung/kidney failure from "research".
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
What bothers me about these women fighting the hostess... well one of the things that bothers me is that common sense should've told you this ain't it. You can fight somebody on the street and get your way but not at a business where you expect to be served. The best case scenario would be for them to be kicked out. Worst case is charges. There was no scenario where they'd beat down the hostess and sit down to a lovely meal. I understand emotions getting the best of you but I reserve that level of crazy for situations where I'm personally wronged ie cheated on, stolen from, etc.
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
I got Pfizer and I wonder what a Moderna booster would do lol :scratchchin:

Hmm I have to wonder if that has to do with the availability of the each brand in some areas. Because most of the places around here had Pfizer (in my experience) and we are the unhealthiest state out there, so it seems like more of our people would just naturally end up in the hospital.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
What bothers me about these women fighting the hostess... well one of the things that bothers me is that common sense should've told you this ain't it. You can fight somebody on the street and get your way but not at a business where you expect to be served. The best case scenario would be for them to be kicked out. Worst case is charges. There was no scenario where they'd beat down the hostess and sit down to a lovely meal. I understand emotions getting the best of you but I reserve that level of crazy for situations where I'm personally wronged ie cheated on, stolen from, etc.
I hear you. They paid to travel cross country in a pandemic just to act a damn fool over .

I kind of feel some kind of way about the following:

The very wording of Upper West Side and Upper East Side indicates $$$$$. I've heard of Carmine's but I've never been there but somehow I know it's a siddity restaurant. Why in that video did I stare at this big ole chitlin eatin negroes drawers and booty crack hanging out sweat pants at the siddity eating spot? Didn't nobody wanna see his lower South Side and I am unanimous in that. :mad:
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Everything Zen

Well-Known Member
You ain't said nothing but a word. The Orthodox everywhere they can be found will not use electricity on the High Holy Days which means in person services only. They will pack themselves inside or outside a venue like little circumcised sardines and breathe all over each other.

This is a gathering outside in Australia last month, a year and change deep into a pandemic. Even though it's outside, how safe does this look? This isn't even for a holiday. Multiply this time everywhere Orthodox are in the world and the outbreak rules write themselves. Meanwhile, yesterday I was watching services from the comfort of my bed live and direct on the Tube of You.

I wonder what the numbers look like down the street in Skokie? :scratchchin:
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
Cliff notes:
Reporter for Guardian Media contacts Nicki's family in Trinidad to get the story. Says CNN is looking for them and will reveal where he and his gf live but they (Guardian Media) won't do that if he talks to her. Nicki posts screenshots and then doxxes the reporter and somebody else at the Guardian. Instagram takes down the posts and Nicki plays the victim again. Reporter deletes her accounts (presumably her professional and personal accounts) and says she plans to sue.

ETA: Another reporter claimed one of the social media accounts attributed to the reporter Nicki's targeting isn't actually hers so the part about her planning to sue may not be accurate.



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Not sure who this guy is since everything else I've seen is focusing on a different reporter.

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She threatened the reporter

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Then she posted her phone number

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And sent this DM to the reporter

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And posted this for everyone to see

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King of Sorrow

Well-Known Member
She's an international star who married and had a child with a sex offender at the height of her fame. That her comments have had the life they've had regarding a public health matter ...

I found out today that a coworker (who has been walking maskless around the office for the last few months) is not vaccinated and believes that because he had COVID (not hospitalized but admitted that at times he didn't think he would make it) earlier this year his antibodies are better than vaccine antibodies. Yet, lately he's been looking like refried doodoo and has taken the last few days off because he's worried it might be COVID again. Will probably never know if it was a reinfection or something else.

Meanwhile, my company has today decided to issue a vaccine mandate after over a year of lax enforcement of its own mask and social distancing policies and after holding company-wide events (to their credit, held outdoors), where masks were not required, among vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. Most of us could do, and for the first three months of the pandemic did, our jobs remotely but they insist on everyone being in the office 5 days a week. Every other person I know who works in this sector will be working remotely until at least 2022.

I need a new job.

Didn''t nobody wanna see his lower South Side and I am unanimous in that.
Mary Elizabeth Jennifer Rachel Abergavenny "Betty" Slocombe?
 

galleta31

Well-Known Member
This is really happening, we have tents again at 2 of the hospitals here. The people are ignorant too, entitled and demanding and want you at their beck and call. I can't give you what we don't have. :(

View attachment 475903

I feel so sorry for the healthcare workers impacted from this past year in a half. I feel like this current wave is even worse because of all the "covid protocols" on the web that patients are now demanding. Between the patients and hospital administrations, I feel like nurses get the shortest end of the stick.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
This isn't directly about covid but covid exacerbated the situation. Crime rates increasing and covid have strained the resources of the facility and now they're releasing some with technical parole violations. It's interesting how covid is impacting so many different areas.


Hochul Orders Release of 191 Detainees as Rikers Crisis Deepens​

The New York governor signed a bill on Friday that authorized the release of the detainees, but the population of the city’s notorious jail will remain far higher than it was last spring.​

Sept. 17, 2021


By Rebecca Davis O’Brien and Chelsia Rose Marcius

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Friday ordered the release of nearly 200 detainees from New York City’s Rikers Island jail complex, underscoring the growing alarm about violence and unbridled disorder at the notorious facility.

Ms. Hochul’s move came amid increasing calls for federal or state intervention at the city-run jail, which officials and detainees say has plunged into chaos — Ms. Hochul described it as a “pressure cooker” — and is rife with health and safety risks for inmates and employees alike. Ten detainees have died there since December, including several from suicide.

But the plan will not significantly reduce overcrowding, and it may do little to address two continuing crises at Rikers, one rooted in an acute staff shortage at the complex, the other in an increase in coronavirus cases there in recent weeks.

In addition to the release of the 191 detainees she announced Friday, Ms. Hochul also said she would transfer 200 others to state prisons in the coming days. Even with those moves, Rikers will be far more crowded than it was in spring 2020, when a wave of releases during the pandemic lowered the population below 4,000. On Friday, more than 6,000 people, the vast majority of them awaiting trial, were being held there.

The release of the detainees was based on a new law that Ms. Hochul signed on Friday that seeks to reduce jail populations by ending the practice of incarcerating people who commit certain technical parole violations.

But the law does not tackle what a court-appointed federal monitor has described as the widespread absenteeism among correction officers that has contributed to a deterioration of security and health conditions at the complex. With hundreds or thousands of guards not showing up to work daily, officials and detainees alike say that basic jail functions have ground to a halt: Gangs patrol hallways, detainees are held in showers repurposed as stalls and some incarcerated people are going without water, food or medical care for days.

On Friday, some local officials suggested that the federal authorities might seek to wrest control of the crisis from the city. Eric Gonzalez, the Brooklyn district attorney, urged the monitor to ask a federal judge to order authorities to increase staffing levels. The monitor was appointed in 2015 under a settlement between the city and the Justice Department that was meant to resolve a class-action civil rights lawsuit that detailed abuses at Rikers.

“About a month ago, the federal monitor overseeing Rikers stated that for the time being the situation was best dealt with by the City and the Department of Correction,” a spokesman for Mr. Gonzalez said on Friday. “That time is now over, and an immediate action plan to increase staffing and safety is required.”

At a meeting on Friday with the leaders of the unions that represent Rikers officers, Vincent Schiraldi, the correction commissioner, mentioned several ideas that he said were being considered to address the crisis, according to Joseph Russo, the president of the union that represents assistant deputy wardens and deputy wardens.

Those ideas include transferring officers in from state juvenile facilities and hiring private security guards to handle some duties at the complex. A Correction Department spokesman confirmed that bringing in private firms had been discussed but that the jobs in question would not involve interacting with people in custody.

Mr. Russo said that the unions would fiercely resist any plan to privatize jobs held by uniformed correction employees.

“We are circling our wagons and discussing what we can do to stop it,” he said.

Benny Boscio, the president of the Correction Officers’ Benevolent Association, said in a statement on Friday that the jobs being discussed did require significant contact with incarcerated people and that any move to privatize them would be illegal.

He said that Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has come under harsh criticism for his response to the problems at the complex was trying “to cover up years of intentional neglect, failing to hire any C.O.s and leaving Rikers to rot until it closes.”

Ms. Boscio added: “Now he’s willing to break the law to help his own reputation before a run for governor.”

The mounting disorder at the jail comes as the city confronts a rise in violent crime, which some law-enforcement officials cited as a contributing factor to the overcrowding at Rikers.

Last fall, there were around 700 defendants from the Bronx being held at the complex; this month, there were 1,100, an increase that Darcel D. Clark, the Bronx district attorney, attributed to a “surge in violence.” She noted that most of those defendants had been charged with violent crimes, including murder, domestic violence, shootings and rape.

As the violence at Rikers has worsened, finger-pointing has ensued: The correction officers’ union has blamed mismanagement, staffing shortfalls and unsafe conditions for thousands of worker absences. Prosecutors have blamed delays in court for a backlog of detained defendants. Judges have faulted the Correction Department for defendants missing court appointments.

And Mr. de Blasio, who has championed a plan to eventually close the troubled facility, has come under withering criticism both for his handling of the crisis and his failure to visit the jail complex in recent years. The closing plan,approved two years ago by the City Council, has stalled amid objections to creating four new jails around the city to replace Rikers.

This week, after a series of violent episodes and reports of chaotic conditions at Rikers, Mr. de Blasio announced an emergency plan that would allow the Correction Department to suspend without pay workers who were found to be absent without permission. From July 2020 to June of this year, the average number of guards who called in sick each month had more than doubled, while the number of those who were absent without official approval had risen 300 percent.

Tina Luongo, attorney-in-charge of the Criminal Defense Practice at The Legal Aid Society, said that Ms. Hochul’s willingness to sign the law, known as the Less is More Act, was a strong first step toward decreasing the population at Rikers.

But Mx. Luongo also said Mr. de Blasio had not done nearly enough to sharply lower the number of detainees at the complex, and urged him to put those serving sentences for low-level crimes on supervised release rather than transferring them to state prison.

“Less is More is hugely important, and this is the level of crisis intervention you want to see from leadership,” Mx. Luongo said.

“I don’t see that level of crisis intervention leadership from the mayor. There are still things that must be done,” they added. “He has the opportunity to do it right now.”

On Friday, Mr. de Blasio said the city had committed to releasing the 191 detainees as soon as possible. In some cases, he said, it might take several days to free those who had to appear in court before they could be released.

He also said the best way to reduce the jail population was to fully restart the court system.

“I’ve been appealing to the state to restart the whole criminal justice system, the court system fully,” he said.

But Ms. Clark, the Bronx District Attorney, said the staffing crisis had also exacerbated the backlog of court cases. Without an adequate number of guards, she said, defendants who are being held in the jails are not arriving to court on time, or at all.

“Now, because of the staffing issue, we have inmates indicted for violence while in jail who are not being produced for arraignment in a timely manner,” Ms. Clark said.

While officials seek to tamp down the chaos at the jail, virus rates among detainees appear to be climbing. Correctional health officials first reported an uptick in the prevalence of the virus in mid-August, followed by a spike in cases later in the month. After active cases and rates in the jail dropped to near zero in June and July, the seven-day average positive test rate among detainees — 4.36 percent this week — is now higher than the city’s overall 3.92 rate.

Only 36 percent of detainees and 37 percent of the Correction Department’s staff are fully vaccinated, according to city data.

“The current conditions are resulting in a rapid increase in Covid-19 infection rate in the jails. Previously effective control mechanisms such as isolation and quarantine will not be possible because of the department’s dysfunction and overcrowding,” Dr. Robert Cohen, a member of the Board of Correction, an independent body that monitors the jail system, said at a City Council hearing this week.

On Friday, Dr. Cohen praised Ms. Hochul’s signing of the bill, but he said more needed to be done to further reduce the jail population.

“Decarceration is the critical response to this emergency because until the officers come back it will allow the smaller staff to potentially function more safely for everybody,” he said.

The city should also move quickly to close Rikers, said the state’s former chief judge, Jonathan Lippman, who led the study to shutter the troubled jail.

“There’s nothing that is enough until you close that horrible place,” Judge Lippman said in an interview. “We cant keep kicking this down the road. There’s got to be an urgency. Less is More is helpful, but this is getting into a crisis mode. There’s no easy answer.”

Most of the 191 people set to be released on Friday were being held for violating parole, and Ms. Hochul said the new law’s focus on ending reimprisonment tor technical violations was a crucial step toward ending one of the largest causes of mass incarceration in New York.

“Parole in this state often becomes a ticket back into jail because of technical violations,” she said. “Someone was caught with a drink or using a substance or missing an appointment.”

In its report last month, the federal monitor said the staff shortages had compounded a breakdown in basic security protocols, which had led to a rash of violence across the jail.

“This state of seriously compromised safety has spiraled to a point at which, on a daily basis, there is a manifest risk of serious harm to both detainees and staff,” the monitor, Steve Martin, wrote. “Turmoil is the inevitable outcome of such a volatile state of affairs.”
 

vevster

Well-Known Member
This isn't directly about covid but covid exacerbated the situation. Crime rates increasing and covid have strained the resources of the facility and now they're releasing some with technical parole violations. It's interesting how covid is impacting so many different areas.


Hochul Orders Release of 191 Detainees as Rikers Crisis Deepens​

The New York governor signed a bill on Friday that authorized the release of the detainees, but the population of the city’s notorious jail will remain far higher than it was last spring.​

Sept. 17, 2021


By Rebecca Davis O’Brien and Chelsia Rose Marcius

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Friday ordered the release of nearly 200 detainees from New York City’s Rikers Island jail complex, underscoring the growing alarm about violence and unbridled disorder at the notorious facility.

Ms. Hochul’s move came amid increasing calls for federal or state intervention at the city-run jail, which officials and detainees say has plunged into chaos — Ms. Hochul described it as a “pressure cooker” — and is rife with health and safety risks for inmates and employees alike. Ten detainees have died there since December, including several from suicide.

But the plan will not significantly reduce overcrowding, and it may do little to address two continuing crises at Rikers, one rooted in an acute staff shortage at the complex, the other in an increase in coronavirus cases there in recent weeks.

In addition to the release of the 191 detainees she announced Friday, Ms. Hochul also said she would transfer 200 others to state prisons in the coming days. Even with those moves, Rikers will be far more crowded than it was in spring 2020, when a wave of releases during the pandemic lowered the population below 4,000. On Friday, more than 6,000 people, the vast majority of them awaiting trial, were being held there.

The release of the detainees was based on a new law that Ms. Hochul signed on Friday that seeks to reduce jail populations by ending the practice of incarcerating people who commit certain technical parole violations.

But the law does not tackle what a court-appointed federal monitor has described as the widespread absenteeism among correction officers that has contributed to a deterioration of security and health conditions at the complex. With hundreds or thousands of guards not showing up to work daily, officials and detainees alike say that basic jail functions have ground to a halt: Gangs patrol hallways, detainees are held in showers repurposed as stalls and some incarcerated people are going without water, food or medical care for days.

On Friday, some local officials suggested that the federal authorities might seek to wrest control of the crisis from the city. Eric Gonzalez, the Brooklyn district attorney, urged the monitor to ask a federal judge to order authorities to increase staffing levels. The monitor was appointed in 2015 under a settlement between the city and the Justice Department that was meant to resolve a class-action civil rights lawsuit that detailed abuses at Rikers.

“About a month ago, the federal monitor overseeing Rikers stated that for the time being the situation was best dealt with by the City and the Department of Correction,” a spokesman for Mr. Gonzalez said on Friday. “That time is now over, and an immediate action plan to increase staffing and safety is required.”

At a meeting on Friday with the leaders of the unions that represent Rikers officers, Vincent Schiraldi, the correction commissioner, mentioned several ideas that he said were being considered to address the crisis, according to Joseph Russo, the president of the union that represents assistant deputy wardens and deputy wardens.

Those ideas include transferring officers in from state juvenile facilities and hiring private security guards to handle some duties at the complex. A Correction Department spokesman confirmed that bringing in private firms had been discussed but that the jobs in question would not involve interacting with people in custody.

Mr. Russo said that the unions would fiercely resist any plan to privatize jobs held by uniformed correction employees.

“We are circling our wagons and discussing what we can do to stop it,” he said.

Benny Boscio, the president of the Correction Officers’ Benevolent Association, said in a statement on Friday that the jobs being discussed did require significant contact with incarcerated people and that any move to privatize them would be illegal.

He said that Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has come under harsh criticism for his response to the problems at the complex was trying “to cover up years of intentional neglect, failing to hire any C.O.s and leaving Rikers to rot until it closes.”

Ms. Boscio added: “Now he’s willing to break the law to help his own reputation before a run for governor.”

The mounting disorder at the jail comes as the city confronts a rise in violent crime, which some law-enforcement officials cited as a contributing factor to the overcrowding at Rikers.

Last fall, there were around 700 defendants from the Bronx being held at the complex; this month, there were 1,100, an increase that Darcel D. Clark, the Bronx district attorney, attributed to a “surge in violence.” She noted that most of those defendants had been charged with violent crimes, including murder, domestic violence, shootings and rape.

As the violence at Rikers has worsened, finger-pointing has ensued: The correction officers’ union has blamed mismanagement, staffing shortfalls and unsafe conditions for thousands of worker absences. Prosecutors have blamed delays in court for a backlog of detained defendants. Judges have faulted the Correction Department for defendants missing court appointments.

And Mr. de Blasio, who has championed a plan to eventually close the troubled facility, has come under withering criticism both for his handling of the crisis and his failure to visit the jail complex in recent years. The closing plan,approved two years ago by the City Council, has stalled amid objections to creating four new jails around the city to replace Rikers.

This week, after a series of violent episodes and reports of chaotic conditions at Rikers, Mr. de Blasio announced an emergency plan that would allow the Correction Department to suspend without pay workers who were found to be absent without permission. From July 2020 to June of this year, the average number of guards who called in sick each month had more than doubled, while the number of those who were absent without official approval had risen 300 percent.

Tina Luongo, attorney-in-charge of the Criminal Defense Practice at The Legal Aid Society, said that Ms. Hochul’s willingness to sign the law, known as the Less is More Act, was a strong first step toward decreasing the population at Rikers.

But Mx. Luongo also said Mr. de Blasio had not done nearly enough to sharply lower the number of detainees at the complex, and urged him to put those serving sentences for low-level crimes on supervised release rather than transferring them to state prison.

“Less is More is hugely important, and this is the level of crisis intervention you want to see from leadership,” Mx. Luongo said.

“I don’t see that level of crisis intervention leadership from the mayor. There are still things that must be done,” they added. “He has the opportunity to do it right now.”

On Friday, Mr. de Blasio said the city had committed to releasing the 191 detainees as soon as possible. In some cases, he said, it might take several days to free those who had to appear in court before they could be released.

He also said the best way to reduce the jail population was to fully restart the court system.

“I’ve been appealing to the state to restart the whole criminal justice system, the court system fully,” he said.

But Ms. Clark, the Bronx District Attorney, said the staffing crisis had also exacerbated the backlog of court cases. Without an adequate number of guards, she said, defendants who are being held in the jails are not arriving to court on time, or at all.

“Now, because of the staffing issue, we have inmates indicted for violence while in jail who are not being produced for arraignment in a timely manner,” Ms. Clark said.

While officials seek to tamp down the chaos at the jail, virus rates among detainees appear to be climbing. Correctional health officials first reported an uptick in the prevalence of the virus in mid-August, followed by a spike in cases later in the month. After active cases and rates in the jail dropped to near zero in June and July, the seven-day average positive test rate among detainees — 4.36 percent this week — is now higher than the city’s overall 3.92 rate.

Only 36 percent of detainees and 37 percent of the Correction Department’s staff are fully vaccinated, according to city data.

“The current conditions are resulting in a rapid increase in Covid-19 infection rate in the jails. Previously effective control mechanisms such as isolation and quarantine will not be possible because of the department’s dysfunction and overcrowding,” Dr. Robert Cohen, a member of the Board of Correction, an independent body that monitors the jail system, said at a City Council hearing this week.

On Friday, Dr. Cohen praised Ms. Hochul’s signing of the bill, but he said more needed to be done to further reduce the jail population.

“Decarceration is the critical response to this emergency because until the officers come back it will allow the smaller staff to potentially function more safely for everybody,” he said.

The city should also move quickly to close Rikers, said the state’s former chief judge, Jonathan Lippman, who led the study to shutter the troubled jail.

“There’s nothing that is enough until you close that horrible place,” Judge Lippman said in an interview. “We cant keep kicking this down the road. There’s got to be an urgency. Less is More is helpful, but this is getting into a crisis mode. There’s no easy answer.”

Most of the 191 people set to be released on Friday were being held for violating parole, and Ms. Hochul said the new law’s focus on ending reimprisonment tor technical violations was a crucial step toward ending one of the largest causes of mass incarceration in New York.

“Parole in this state often becomes a ticket back into jail because of technical violations,” she said. “Someone was caught with a drink or using a substance or missing an appointment.”

In its report last month, the federal monitor said the staff shortages had compounded a breakdown in basic security protocols, which had led to a rash of violence across the jail.

“This state of seriously compromised safety has spiraled to a point at which, on a daily basis, there is a manifest risk of serious harm to both detainees and staff,” the monitor, Steve Martin, wrote. “Turmoil is the inevitable outcome of such a volatile state of affairs.”
I recently read on my neighborood app that license plates are being stolen off cars - people who can’t pay insurance use a stolen plate to drive around in.
 

Kanky

Well-Known Member
I am so annoyed by this story. Just look at the time, effort and other resources that went in to saving this probably Trumpy white dude while black people who actually have reasons to be suspicious of the healthcare system die at home.
 
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