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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
Nah. They are handing it out like candy. It was bound to run low.

and people who didn’t get the vaccination magically are ok with getting this new man made treatment when they get scared,

But the article states that the government is limiting supplies not that the treatment is running low. The article says the drug is massed produced. So the companies can keep mass producing it. If this treatment is keeping people from being hospitalized then why limit it? Isn't that the same thing the vaccine is doing?

Some people are ok with getting it and some people are not but the option should still be available. My patient wasn't ok with taking it and has suffered the consequences.
 
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Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
But the article states that the government is limiting supplies not that the treatment is running low. The article says the drug is massed produced. So the companies can keep mass producing it. If this treatment is keeping people from being hospitalized then why limit it? Isn't that the same thing the vaccine is doing?

Some people are ok with getting it and some people are not bit thr option should still be available. My patient wasn't ok with taking it and has suffered the consequences.

We’ve seen a significant increase in demand from the community,” said Dr. Jeffrey Akers, the CEO of Pharmaceutical Services at Appalachian Regional Health. “And we’ve stepped up our efforts to provide the monoclonal antibodies as well.”

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Supply is holding steady for ARH, but rationing is preventing them from expanding services.

”We gave, last week, almost 600 doses,” he said. “So that’s definitely a new record for us. If that trend were to continue then yeah we would definitely not be able to meet that demand based on limited supply.”

ARH hospitals are just some of the locations for monoclonal antibodies in Eastern Kentucky. Baptist Health Corbin is another, and they are facing supply problems as well according to Josh Bowling, the Pharmacy Manager. They even ran out Monday night, and not for the first time.

”This is actually the second time we have temporarily run out of run out of supply,” he said.

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They were able to get a shipment the next day, but officials say things will remain inconsistent as long as demand is high and supply low.
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
The vaccine was mass produced too and there was still a shortage. Mass produced doesn’t mean that something will just be infinitely available no matter the demand.

MaB does work. But it’s provides more passive immunity response (from past information about them) than sustained immunity. Or if someone has some information that counters that, I’d love to read it.

Im just so confused about why people won’t take the vaccine but will run to this treatment. If the vaccine were being limited, then we’d see people crying about it all of a sudden. its Just all crazy
 

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
The vaccine was mass produced too and there was still a shortage. Mass produced doesn’t mean that something will just be infinitely available no matter the demand.

MaB does work. But it’s provides more passive immunity response (from past information about them) than sustained immunity. Or if someone has some information that counters that, I’d love to read it.

Im just so confused about why people won’t take the vaccine but will run to this treatment. If the vaccine were being limited, then we’d see people crying about it all of a sudden. its Just all crazy


Don't be confused because it doesn't really matter why people are taking this treatment over the vaccine. Their reasoning is theirs and it may or may not be logical.

It is a good thing that they are taking something and not being hospitalized or dying from covid. It is better, that they choose this option than nothing at all, or trying to ride covid out and end up hospitalized, dying or with long covid.

The companies said they ran out of a treatments for one day and was able to fill the order the next day. The company said it was a temporary shortage. like everything else that has a high demand.

Demand for MaB has been pretty high and they are keeping up with it. Of course nothing is infinitely supplied or available. But it shouldn't be limited if they are able to produce more to keep up with demand.
If the demand increases more than what can be supplied then some people just won't be able to get it, period. End of story until it comes back in stock. These people are taking a risk any way because the vaccine is not an option they want or else they would have taken it already.
 

Kanky

Well-Known Member
Was this nurse hiding in the bushes and jumping out to vaccinate unsuspecting passersby? Did she sneak into the house and vaccinate his wife while she was in the shower? Because that’s about the only way this man’s actions make any kind of sense.

Actually they need to start “surprise vaccinating” some of these Trump folks. Maybe have the nurse disguised as the Chik-Fil-A drive through person and jab them when they try to get a chicken sandwich.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Someone predicted this upthread. I'm already seeing it locally.

Yep...
Here you go:
They still have a right to not be vaccinated. They just have to find a job that doesn't require it.

INSTALAWYERS were fighting online last week talmbout "they gone sue."

Okay.
..............
And please don't worry about a nursing and health care worker shortage. If you are following my hiring woes post in the Career section, you'll see I discuss that they've been pulling RNs from the Philippines here in FL for the better part of a year. Ain't gone be no shortage. Keep playing games.
Thats why when ppl say the vaccine mandates in Healthcare would cause shortages....I knew they would find a workaround. :(

I feel like Education is going this way as well.
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
I wanted to update on the medically fragile infant who got covid. Little guy is doing a lot better.

He is not sleeping as well since he was discharged . Nor is he able to sit up or stand as well as he used to.

His 2 siblings that were too young to be vaccinated caught it. The older vaccinated 2 never tested positive .
 

Everything Zen

Well-Known Member
Even though I feel some kind of way about getting a booster less than a year from the original vaccine, right about now I'm far more ready to skip the line to get one sooner than I was to get the initial shot.

BTW - American's sound weird saying jab. Shot and jab both sound so violent though.
Apparently a few of the kids (just my dumb :censored: “brother”) have been calling it the “Fauci ouchie”.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
People really need to stop with the fake religious exemptions. There are very few religions that tell people not to get vaccinated. Your cousin’s pastor claiming that it is the mark of the beast should not get you a religious exemption.
As someone who was fixated on the horror story which is the book of revelations, I wonder how many people who "believe" the mark of the beast excuse to avoid vaccination actually read those passages. Because the Christian chronicles are really explicit that you will be told exactly what you're getting in the MotB and you have to be like "Yep, I explicitly accept this thing that has been fully explained to me to be directly from the devil."

I'm ready for everybody to just stop this foolishness and also read the books you claim to read.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member

No, Vaccinated People Are Not ‘Just as Likely’ to Spread the Coronavirus as Unvaccinated People

This has become a common refrain among the cautious—and it’s wrong.

By Craig Spencer

For many fully vaccinated Americans, the Delta surge spoiled what should’ve been a glorious summer. Those who had cast their masks aside months ago were asked to dust them off. Many are still taking no chances. Some have even returned to all the same precautions they took before getting their shots, including avoiding the company of other fully vaccinated people.

Among this last group, a common refrain I’ve heard to justify their renewed vigilance is that “vaccinated people are just as likely to spread the coronavirus.”

This misunderstanding, born out of confusing statements from public-health authorities and misleading media headlines, is a shame. It is resulting in unnecessary fear among vaccinated people, all the while undermining the public’s understanding of the importance—and effectiveness—of getting vaccinated.

So let me make one thing clear: Vaccinated people are not as likely to spread the coronavirus as the unvaccinated. Even in the United States, where more than half of the population is fully vaccinated, the unvaccinated are responsible for the overwhelming majority of transmission.

I understand why people are confused. In April, after months of public-health experts cautiously promoting the merits of vaccination, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky cited new real-world data of the shots’ effectiveness to jubilantly proclaim that “vaccinated people do not carry the virus.” The CDC later walked back her comment, but headlines such as “It’s Official: Vaccinated People Don’t Transmit COVID-19” had already given many the impression that in addition to their remarkable protection against infection with the coronavirus, the shots also prevented them from passing the illness on to others.

Scientists and researchers objected, warning that there weren’t enough data to support such a proclamation. Their concerns were prescient. As Delta first took hold early this summer and then quickly spread, our collective relief turned into dejection.

An outbreak in Provincetown, Massachusetts—in which 74 percent of the 469 cases were in the fully vaccinated—forced the CDC to update its mask guidance and issue a sad and sobering warning: Vaccinated people infected with the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant can be just as contagious as unvaccinated people.

In the aftermath of the Provincetown announcement, many who had gotten their shots were confused about what the news meant for them, especially when headlines seemed to imply that vaccinated individuals are as likely to contract and transmit COVID-19 as the unvaccinated. But this framing missed the single most important factor in spreading the coronavirus: To spread the coronavirus, you have to have the coronavirus. And vaccinated people are far less likely to have the coronavirus—period. If this was mentioned at all, it was treated as an afterthought.

Despite concern about waning immunity, vaccines provide the best protection against infection. And if someone isn’t infected, they can’t spread the coronavirus. It’s truly that simple. Additionally, for those instances of a vaccinated person getting a breakthrough case, yes, they can be as infectious as an unvaccinated person. But they are likely contagious for a shorter period of time when compared with the unvaccinated, and they may harbor less infectious virus overall.


That’s why getting more people their shots is crucial for controlling the spread of the coronavirus: Every vaccinated person helps limit the virus’s ability to hide, replicate, and propagate.

Among the unvaccinated, the virus travels unhindered on a highway with multiple off-ramps and refueling stations. In the vaccinated, it gets lost in a maze of dead-end streets and cul-de-sacs. Every so often, it pieces together an escape route, but in most scenarios, it finds itself cut off, and its journey ends. It can go no further.

This is borne out by recent data from New York City that show that more than 96 percent of cases are among the unvaccinated. Only 0.33 percent of fully vaccinated New Yorkers have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

To highlight what this means in the real world, imagine two weddings with 100 guests, one where everyone is unvaccinated and another where all the guests are vaccinated.

In the unvaccinated wedding group, the likelihood that at least one of the guests has COVID-19 is high. Similarly, everyone present is more susceptible, and the virus will likely infect many others, given the increased transmissibility of the Delta variant.

At the wedding with exclusively vaccinated attendees, however, the likelihood that anyone present has COVID-19 is minuscule. Even if someone present is infected, the likelihood that the other guests will contract the virus is similarly low, given the protection afforded by their shots.


This is exactly why vaccine mandates are so important—and why going to events that exclude unvaccinated people is much, much safer than those that are open to all. Everyone knows that the vaccines help protect each individual who gets their shots. But when more people get vaccinated, this helps keep everyone else (including children and others ineligible for vaccination) safe as well.

It’s worth acknowledging that even though the vaccines are our best protection—and still do what we need them to do very well—they’re not perfect. Vaccinated individuals can experience breakthrough infections, and when they do, they can potentially infect others. Some may also develop long COVID, although thankfully the shots dramatically lower this risk too. These reasons are exactly why, in many circumstances, mitigation measures such as masking and mandates still make sense to help limit the spread, even for the vaccinated.

As an emergency-medicine physician, I’ve seen firsthand the vaccines’ dramatic role in reducing severe outcomes from a virus that flooded my emergency room early in the pandemic. And as a member of one of the first groups vaccinated in the rollout, I was kept safe by the shots while I cared for patients, and they prevented me from bringing the virus home to my family.

But ultimately, a COVID-19 diagnosis in someone close to me is what highlighted why the assertion that the vaccinated are as likely to spread the coronavirus as the unvaccinated is so wrong.

Recently my cousin contacted me when her daughter tested positive for COVID-19. Her daughter fell ill just weeks before her 12th birthday, when she would’ve been eligible for a vaccine. My fully vaccinated cousin spent nearly every moment at her side—always indoors and usually unmasked—yet never fell ill herself.

“The vaccine seems to be working. It’s magic!” she texted me. Before getting her shots, she would have almost certainly been infected, and likely passed it on to others. But the vaccine broke the chain of transmission. My cousin never spread her daughter’s COVID-19 to anyone because she never caught it.
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member

yamilee21

Well-Known Member
This is borne out by recent data from New York City that show that more than 96 percent of cases are among the unvaccinated. Only 0.33 percent of fully vaccinated New Yorkers have been diagnosed with COVID-19.
Nope; this is flat out wrong. In New York City, on average, 30% of all new cases are occurring among the vaccinated, since June. The 96% may refer to *hospitalized* cases; the overwhelming number of hospitalizations and deaths are indeed occurring among the unvaccinated, while many of the vaccinated cases are found through routine testing, or because they have been exposed to others. Some do have minor symptoms, but not enough to routinely merit hospitalization.
ETA: If we are counting cases from March 2020, then yes, the 96% may be accurate… but NYC now has over 5 million out of 8.6 million vaccinated, and the proportion of vaccinated cases among new cases has remained in the 25-35% range for about four months now. It’s NOT the same situation as what we are seeing in places like Idaho, where levels of vaccination are low, and cases are still overwhelming occurring among the unvaccinated.

News reports have to be careful with wording; inaccurate reports contribute to careless behavior. In NYC, most cases among vaccinated people are with white people who are taking few other precautions. Vaccinated black and Latino seem to continue taking greater precautions. (Asians have the highest rates of vaccinations, but vaccinated or not, they are getting the fewest cases, as they have been taking the greatest precautions from the beginning.)
 
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Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
The thing about Covid that should scare people poo less is that you have no idea how it's going to hit you until it hits you. Yeah, you may luck out and have a few miserable days and go about your life but it's a whole lot of folks out here Fornicating around and Finding Out that Rona ain't they lil play play friend. Richie Cunningham in the story ain't old, ain't fat, ain't have any obvious comorbidities but covid turned a sinus infection which is normally nothing into a brain rupture. By all accounts, this dude was the prototype for "don't worry about it" and look where he at.

I feel bad for his mother.
 
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