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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
It’s a well known fact that our true CEO thinks we should consider ourselves lucky to work for him. Last year we took on even more projects on top of impossible constantly moving deadlines, no resources and they made Juneteenth a floating “All Lives Matter” holiday o stead of giving the actual day off. The puppet CEO made an empty platitude statement about diversity and inclusion on the anniversary date of Juneteenth when there isn’t a single black man or woman in leadership and on the board of directors. The only reason I was even promoted to my role was because someone quit because the project is impossible and the VP (who also recently quit) had to apologize to me last year when he repeatedly disrespected me for openly refusing to acknowledging my role as the SME in our department in helping teach and train our sites on a novel cellular therapeutic product but gave all the credit to an incompetent white trial manager that I was forced to work under and carry the entire time. I am the lowest paid trial manager doing the most work leading directors on the most high profile project and when I applied for an associate director role in another department that the previous AD knew I was perfect for and told the Director that he thought very highly of me for they completely changed the job description so I would not be eligible. This among many other reasons is why I decided to start courting the multiple much higher paying offers being flung at me and why I am about about to join my third round interview in 5 minutes. #greatresignation
I hope the interview went well!
 

Peppermynt

Defying Gravity
So a second friend of mine has had a close call. And this one is my sister from another mother.

She usually housesits for friends in Delaware who have two cats every summer. I’ve gone with her in years past but not this year. Anyway, she gets there and finds out that the couples trip to Aruba is postponed because they tested positive prior to getting clearance for their flight. The couple was vaccinated but not sure which vaccines.

Anyway my “sis” stays at a hotel instead of their home and returns. She gets tested to be sure and is negative. But the woman from the couple who were to travel is now in the hospital as of Sunday as her oxygen levels are really low and she’s had a fever for about 5 days. My sis said the woman is really scared.
So the good news is the Delaware friend of my "sis" is home as of last Friday. The friend ("K") reports she's feeling around a 6 out of 10 but overall its good news that she's home. K had the J&J vaccine. Not sure what K's husband had - he was sick but not in hospital ...

If I get more info I'll share as K was apparently on some medicine for 5 days while in there - not sure if this is the antibody regiment (which I thought needed to begin asap) or something else they're doing now.
 

winterinatl

All natural!
Today was the mandate Cliff for the state workers in WA. You had to be fully vaccinated by today. Here is an article with more details. I’ve been worried about these “exemptions” and looks like I was right too. If the district accommodates a teacher by double masking, looks like they get to stay unvaccinated. That horrifies me. Because it’s adults spreading it to kids and bringing it to school.
.

Unvaccinated Washington state employees face their last day on the job​

For more than 30 years, Charles LeBlanc has served the state of Washington. First as a state trooper, rising to the rank of captain. And, since 2017, as Washington’s fire marshal overseeing such things as the state’s fire training academy and enforcing fireworks regulations. But now LeBlanc is about to turn in his badge.

“The 18th [of October] will be my last day at work for the state. The 19th I will walk away without further employment, with no medical or dental coverage for my family,” LeBlanc said.

LeBlanc is among potentially hundreds, if not thousands, of Washington state employees poised to lose their jobs Monday because they didn’t comply with Gov. Jay Inslee’s requirement to get the COVID-19 vaccine. The state doesn’t expect to know the true “separation” number for several days.

Inslee issued his mandate — which also covers health care, long-term care and educational workers — in August amid skyrocketing COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations driven by the contagious delta variant. The so-called “fifth wave” was often described by hospitals and health care providers as the worst since the start of the pandemic. To date, Washington has confirmed more than 600,000 COVID-19 cases, logged nearly 38,000 hospitalizations and recorded over 8,000 deaths.

Inslee’s mandate covered more than 800,000 public and private sector workers, including about 61,000 general government employees. He gave them until October 18 to get fully vaccinated, or be fired.

There was an option for workers to seek medical or religious exemptions. As of October 7, about 6,069 state employees had sought exemptions and roughly 84 percent of those requests had been approved, according to state data.

But just because an employee received an exemption didn’t mean they could remain unvaccinated and keep their job. For that to happen, the worker had to get an approved accommodation from their agency. And the Inslee administration drew a hard line on accommodations in the name of health and safety.

For the most part, anyone whose job was public-facing, involved direct care or put them in close proximity to colleagues couldn’t be accommodated in their current position — even if they agreed to get tested regularly and take extra precautions like double-masking or wearing an N95 mask.

“Mask and test was the approach used prior to the mandate and resulted in outbreaks for staff and clients who were being served,” wrote Mike Faulk, an Inslee spokesperson in an email. “It did not work to meet the safety standards that are owed to our staff or clients.”

Instead, to get an accommodation, exempted workers generally had to be reassigned to a “back office” job or one that allowed them to telework.

According to the most recent data available from the state, only about 30 percent of requests for accommodation were being approved as of earlier this month. The final percentage, however, is likely to be higher as more than 1,300 requests for accommodation were still pending.

Still, it’s possible that many, if not the majority, of state employees who lose their jobs will be people who got exemptions, but not an accommodation — as opposed to workers who simply refused to get the vaccine and didn’t seek an exemption.

Generally, federal law requires employers to provide workers with a “reasonable accommodation” so long as it doesn’t create an “undue hardship” on the employer.

By law, employers have a greater obligation to accommodate workers with a medical exemption than those with a religious exemption. In the case of a religious exemption, the agency can say “no” if the accommodation would impose more than a minimal burden on operations.

In LeBlanc’s case, he got a letter from his doctor saying he has a “qualifying contraindication” to the COVID vaccine because of ongoing health issues and a history of adverse events, including once going into anaphylactic shock after getting an allergy shot.

With his doctor’s letter in hand, LeBlanc said he applied for and received a medical exemption, but was told by the Washington State Patrol, his employer, that he couldn’t be accommodated because of the public-facing nature of his job. Given the choice of getting vaccinated or getting fired, LeBlanc chose the latter.

“I think a mandate is very, very dangerous because ... you’re taking people like me and basically asking me to play Russian Roulette with my life by taking a vaccination,” LeBlanc said.

LeBlanc added that he’s confident he has some natural immunity to COVID-19 after contracting the virus this summer.

Recently, LeBlanc became a plaintiff in a lawsuit brought by dozens of state and local public sector workers that aims to overturn the governor’s mandate. A hearing in that lawsuit is scheduled for Monday in Thurston County Superior Court.

A separate lawsuit was filed in federal court where, on Friday, a judge in Seattle denied the plaintiffs’ motion to halt the implementation of the mandate.

Seattle attorney Nathan Arnold, who filed both lawsuits, said the state should have found a way to keep people like LeBlanc, who’s one of the State Patrol’s few Pacific Islander employees, from leaving state service.

“I would implore the governor to consider some commonsense accommodations,” Arnold said in an interview last week. “People like the fire marshal who have antibodies, they should be able to continue doing their job.”

In response, Faulk, the Inslee spokesperson, said, “The medical evidence shows vaccination provides a much more robust and longer antibody response than prior infection.”

In a statement, a spokesperson for the State Patrol called LeBlanc “a good man and a good friend” and called his imminent departure “a loss.”

The spokesperson, Chris Loftis, said the agency reviewed each exemption case individually and followed federal equal opportunity and state workplace safety guides to find “accommodations whenever possible.”

“We do not wish to lose a single employee to this situation, but recognize loss will be inevitable given the medical and regulatory complexities of this public health-focused pandemic response,” Loftis said.

As of October 6, 90 percent of the State Patrol’s staff been verified as fully vaccinated. Of the remaining employees who had not confirmed their vaccine status, 91 were sworn officers and 61 were civil servant employees, according to the agency.

In response to the criticism that the state was being too restrictive in granting accommodations, Governor Inslee at a press conference on Thursday defended his get-vaccinated or get-out policy.

“It is a fair thing not to allow public servants to infect the public. We want to serve the public, not infect the public,” Inslee said.

In a 24-page guidance document sent to state agencies, Washington’s Office of Financial Management (OFM), which oversees state human resources, said workers could potentially be accommodated through the “implementation of multiple safety measures.”

The list of safety measures included requiring the employee to wear a surgical grade mask, staggering schedules or improving ventilation.

But a separate “Vaccine Accommodation Matrix” issued by OFM said safety measures “were not stopping the spread of COVID-19” and instructed agencies to take into consideration the type, frequency and risk of contact when deciding on accommodations.

For congregate settings, like prisons and state hospitals, where the risk of transmission is higher, the matrix offered no accommodation option for jobs that “require unavoidable or unpredictable interaction” unless the worker could be moved to a “back office” position.

At the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), which operates several 24/7 facilities including the state’s psychiatric hospitals, a spokesperson said staff with medical or religious exemptions “cannot be provided an accommodation to continue providing direct care.”

The Department of Corrections (DOC) took a similar position.

“Anybody that has that direct contact with our population … we’ve had to remove them from that direct contact with folks, said Assistant Secretary Mike Obenland, who oversees the state’s 12 prisons.

On Friday, DOC said it was working to accommodate all 91 employees who had received medical accommodations and was on track to offer accommodations to about 50 percent of the roughly 600 employees with religious exemptions.

Still, the agency was preparing to lose up to 500 of its 8,900 employees.

“That’s 500 families who are going to lose access to healthcare and pay and benefits and retirement, good union, living-wage jobs,” said Michelle Woodrow, the president and executive director of Teamsters 117, which represents front-line DOC workers.

Woodrow called Inslee’s mandate “rushed” and said her union was leaving open the option of pursuing union grievances or even litigation against the state.

Meanwhile, the Washington Federation of State Employees (WFSE), which represents about 38,000 general government employees , said it’s already pursuing union grievances on behalf of 42 non-front-line workers who received exemptions, but were not accommodated by their agencies.

The state's de facto prohibition on unvaccinated state workers continuing to perform front-line jobs stands in contrast to what some school districts in Washington are allowing.

According to the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), unvaccinated school employees with exemptions are being accommodated through a menu of options that don’t necessarily preclude them from remaining in the classroom or having direct contact with students. That list includes a requirement that they double mask, submit to once or twice-a-week COVID testing and refrain from eating with other staff or students.

“There is no standard approach, OSPI will not be setting minimum requirements, nor will we collect data on the additional health and safety mitigations that you have put in place for your employees who are granted accommodations,” said state Superintendent Chris Reykdal in an email to school districts earlier this month.

Some local fire departments are also allowing unvaccinated firefighters who’ve received exemptions to continue working their regular shifts, but with additional masking and social distancing requirements.

Washington is one of 25 states, including Oregon and California, that have imposed some sort of COVID-19 vaccine mandate, according to LeadingAge, a national trade group that represents nonprofit long-term care facilities. But unlike California, Washington did not offer state workers a testing-in-lieu of vaccination option.

Last week, Inslee said he was “extremely encouraged” after the state worker vaccination rate topped 90 percent. While state agencies are making contingency plans in case of staffing shortages, Inslee said he wasn’t anticipating “massive disruptions” in state services as a result of the employees leaving because they aren’t vaccinated.

“And if people do make a choice to leave service, we will replace them. We will find other people who do decide to become vaccinated,” Inslee said.

Union representatives, though, are warning of worker shortages, especially in state institutions, and the potential for unsafe work conditions.

"We have staffing level issues in our institutions already, which is concerning," said Leanne Kunze, WFSE's executive director.

At the Washington State Patrol, Fire Marshal Charles LeBlanc isn’t the only employee who will be out of a job after Monday. So will Richard and Celina Thompson, a married couple with two small children who live in Vancouver.

Richard is a sergeant with almost 17 years on the job. Celina is a dispatcher approaching her 15th anniversary. They too are plaintiffs in the lawsuit to overturn the mandate.

In an interview in September, both said they felt the governor’s order amounted to government overreach and an infringement on their rights. They also said it was a personal, medical decision to get the vaccine and that they worried about possible side effects, as well as long-term effects.

“I just don’t want to put it in my body,” Celina Thompson said. “Ask me in five to 10 years when there’s been time to see what it does and what it doesn’t do and maybe I’ll reconsider.”

Citing “religious, moral and ethical beliefs” both received religious exemptions from the state patrol but were later told they couldn’t be accommodated.

In a follow-up interview last week, the couple said they’ve come to terms with their decision to leave the State Patrol. They’ve decided to cash out their retirement and purchase a couple of small businesses.

“I do know we’ll be OK and I know we’ll succeed at anything that we do, but there’s some people that are getting fired that won’t be OK,” Celina Thompson said.

Richard, who has an appointment Monday to turn in his State Patrol vehicle and equipment, said the hardest part will be saying goodbye to the troopers he supervises, two of whom are also leaving the agency.

“It’s not fair or right, and neither is the mandate,” he said.
Oct. 18, 2021
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
Apparently parents in the area staged a “protest” over vaccination mandates. These whackadoodles kept their kids home from school.

oooo ouch.

:rolleyes:
Maria Kang, who I followed on Facebook, just psted a letter to the principal saying how her kids were going to participate in a walk out at the school. She then went on to say how kids were at zero risk from the virus, which makes me mad because a lot of kids have died from this and she has just basically discounted their deaths. I’ve unfollowed as did a lot of people.
 

lavaflow99

In search of the next vacation
He must be magic with that puck not to get fired. How does the employer trust anything this person says or does going forward?
I have no idea why he is still employed. He was hit with a gambling debacle last year which his soon to be ex wife (a Becky) accusing him of betting on NHL games. He had to declare bankruptcy due to gambling losses a year or two ago.

I don’t watch hockey like I used to but he must be the top player in the NHL to still around :nono: He sounds like a liability to me.

 

BrownBetty

Well-Known Member
Today was the mandate Cliff for the state workers in WA. You had to be fully vaccinated by today. Here is an article with more details. I’ve been worried about these “exemptions” and looks like I was right too. If the district accommodates a teacher by double masking, looks like they get to stay unvaccinated. That horrifies me. Because it’s adults spreading it to kids and bringing it to school.

“I just don’t want to put it in my body,” Celina Thompson said. “Ask me in five to 10 years when there’s been time to see what it does and what it doesn’t do and maybe I’ll reconsider.”

I just wish people knew how vaccines work.
 

HappyAtLast

2022 Simplicity & Peacefulness
Today was the mandate Cliff for the state workers in WA. You had to be fully vaccinated by today. Here is an article with more details. I’ve been worried about these “exemptions” and looks like I was right too. If the district accommodates a teacher by double masking, looks like they get to stay unvaccinated. That horrifies me. Because it’s adults spreading it to kids and bringing it to school.
Now they'll just be wearing 2 masks under their nose!
 

yamilee21

Well-Known Member
Maria Kang, who I followed on Facebook, just psted a letter to the principal saying how her kids were going to participate in a walk out at the school. She then went on to say how kids were at zero risk from the virus, which makes me mad because a lot of kids have died from this and she has just basically discounted their deaths. I’ve unfollowed as did a lot of people.
No idea who this is, or why she matters, but she’s wrong about not being required to get vaccines just because you have had a disease. Sometimes, even with titre tests indicating immunity, people are required to get certain vaccines. It may be illogical, especially with diseases that are known to only happen once, but there have been many cases of re-infection with Covid, not to mention the constant mutations that keep changing things.
 
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yamilee21

Well-Known Member
Today was the mandate Cliff for the state workers in WA. You had to be fully vaccinated by today. Here is an article with more details. …
“I just don’t want to put it in my body,” Celina Thompson said. “Ask me in five to 10 years when there’s been time to see what it does and what it doesn’t do and maybe I’ll reconsider.” …
I don’t have sympathy for the Celina Thompsons of the USA, but I think denying Charles LeBlanc’s exemption wasn’t fair; he could simply be required have a well-fitted N95 mask at all times, or moved to a desk job. After 30 years, he’s probably close to retirement anyway… seems crazy to be forced to get a vaccine when you have a history of adverse reactions. The whole point was to get enough people vaccinated so that people who legitimately can’t be vaccinated, or in whom the vaccines don’t generate enough immunity, would be protected.

“In LeBlanc’s case, he got a letter from his doctor saying he has a “qualifying contraindication” to the COVID vaccine because of ongoing health issues and a history of adverse events, including once going into anaphylactic shock after getting an allergy shot.”
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
No idea who this is, or why she matters, but she’s wrong about not being required to get vaccines just because you have had a disease. Sometimes, even with titre tests indicating immunity, people are required to get certain vaccines. It maybe illogical, especially with diseases that are known to only happen once, but there have been many cases of re-infection with Covid, not to mention the constant mutations that keep changing things.
She’s a fitness “guru” , but really cashed on the ”mom trying to get in shape” niche. The letter is problematic in a lot of ways I know the administrator who read it is probably shaking her head all the way home.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I don’t have sympathy for the Celina Thompsons of the USA, but I think denying Charles LeBlanc’s exemption wasn’t fair; he could simply be required have a well-fitted N95 mask at all times, or moved to a desk job. After 30 years, he’s probably close to retirement anyway… seems crazy to be forced to get a vaccine when you have a history of adverse reactions. The whole point was to get enough people vaccinated so that people who legitimately can’t be vaccinated, or in whom the vaccines don’t generate enough immunity, would be protected.

“In LeBlanc’s case, he got a letter from his doctor saying he has a “qualifying contraindication” to the COVID vaccine because of ongoing health issues and a history of adverse events, including once going into anaphylactic shock after getting an allergy shot.”
I agree with the bolded and I HATE that unethical doctors like that deranged chiropractor signed off on who knows how many rubber stamped exception cards because now it calls into question the validity of all exception cards. So people who have legit medical exceptions got to jump through hoops because the wrong and loud out here acting a fool.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Today was the mandate Cliff for the state workers in WA. You had to be fully vaccinated by today. Here is an article with more details. I’ve been worried about these “exemptions” and looks like I was right too. If the district accommodates a teacher by double masking, looks like they get to stay unvaccinated. That horrifies me. Because it’s adults spreading it to kids and bringing it to school.
Yeah I heard the Head Coach at the University there was fired as well as some of his staff. It was on NPR all the way here in FL. He was the state's highest paid State Employee making $3M/year. But he refused to get the vaccine.
 

yamilee21

Well-Known Member
She’s a fitness “guru” , but really cashed on the ”mom trying to get in shape” niche. The letter is problematic in a lot of ways I know the administrator who read it is probably shaking her head all the way home.
Oh, is she that “No excuses” woman from a few years ago? Someone posted about starting a “No excuses” exercise group on one of my homeschool parenting groups back then. I figured since it was on a homeschool parents’ list, it would be along the lines of fitness for the family together, or maybe something in a park where the kids could play while the moms exercised and took turns watching the kids. Nope, it was some insane regimen involving a mix of paid group gym classes on 3 days and walking/jogging at the track in 3 different parks on the other days… at 6am every day. Did I mention it was starting in the winter, when the sun isn’t even up until almost 8am, and all three parks were located in questionable-at-best neighborhoods? Of course I declined to join, because there was no way to do this with three kids under 9 at 6 in the morning, especially in the middle of winter… and the organizer responded by accusing me of being a lazy person full of excuses. :rolleyes: :lol:
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Oh, is she that “No excuses” woman from a few years ago? Someone posted about starting a “No excuses” exercise group on one of my homeschool parenting groups back then. I figured since it was on a homeschool parents’ list, it would be along the lines of fitness for the family together, or maybe something in a park where the kids could play while the moms exercised and took turns watching the kids. Nope, it was some insane regimen involving a mix of paid group gym classes on 3 days and walking/jogging at the track in 3 different parks on the other days… at 6am every day. Did I mention it was starting in the winter, when the sun isn’t even up until almost 8am, and all three parks were located in questionable-at-best neighborhoods? Of course I declined to join, because there was no way to do this with three kids under 9 at 6 in the morning, especially in the middle of winter… and the organizer responded by accusing me of being a lazy person full of excuses. :rolleyes: :lol:
Yep, that's her.
I smelt the "GOP" lean on her and I don't follow her anymore. I tried to support because I didn't think she was saying anything bad about moms who don't try. I felt she asked herSELF "what's my excuse" and then pushed herself to get healthy. I don't see anything wrong with challenging oneself and challenging others to ALSO challenge themselves. We all have to ask ourselves the same at one time or another for different things we need to push/power through when otherwise, we see time/energy/resources as a perceived barrier.

Outside of that, I'm not surprised she is anti-vax on this manner.
 

TrulyBlessed

Well-Known Member

FDA authorizes booster doses of Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines, says mix and match OK​

article video

(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration authorized booster dosesof both Covid-19 vaccines made by Moderna and Johnson & Johnson Wednesday and also said any of the three authorized vaccines could be used as a booster in a "mix and match" approach.

The FDA gave emergency use authorization for boosters of Moderna's vaccine for people fully vaccinated at least six months ago who are also at least 65, or who are at least 18 and who are at high risk of severe Covid-19 or have frequent institutional or occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2.

"The use of a single booster dose of the Janssen (Johnson and Johnson) COVID-19 Vaccine may be administered at least 2 months after completion of the single-dose primary regimen to individuals 18 years of age and older," the FDA added in a statement.

 FDA planning to allow mix-and-match Covid-19 vaccine boosters
FDA planning to allow mix-and-match Covid-19 vaccine boosters

"The use of each of the available COVID-19 vaccines as a heterologous (or 'mix and match') booster dose in eligible individuals following completion of primary vaccination with a different available COVID-19 vaccine," the FDA said.

"To clarify that a single booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine may be administered at least 6 months after completion of the primary series to individuals 18 through 64 years of age with frequent institutional or occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2," it added.

"As the pandemic continues to impact the country, science has shown that vaccination continues to be the safest and most effective way to prevent COVID-19, including the most serious consequences of the disease, such as hospitalization and death. The available data suggest waning immunity in some populations who are fully vaccinated. The availability of these authorized boosters is important for continued protection against COVID-19 disease," FDA Acting Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock said in a statement.

"The amendments to the emergency use authorizations to include a single booster dose in eligible populations are based on the available data and information and follows the input from the members of our advisory committee who were supportive of the use of a booster dose of these vaccines in eligible populations," added Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA's vaccine arm, the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

"We are also taking action today to include the use of mix and match boosters to address this public health need. We will work to accrue additional data as quickly as possible to further assess the benefits and risks of the use of booster doses in additional populations and plan to update the healthcare community and public with our determination in the coming weeks."

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's vaccine advisers, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, meets Thursday to decide on whether to recommend the FDA's authorization for the Americans people, and then the CDC director will decide whether to sign off on ACIP's guidance.

 

lavaflow99

In search of the next vacation
Yeah I heard the Head Coach at the University there was fired as well as some of his staff. It was on NPR all the way here in FL. He was the state's highest paid State Employee making $3M/year. But he refused to get the vaccine.
He is an idiot. But saves the school a bunch of money.


Washington State fires football coach Nick Rolovich, 4 assistants for refusing state-mandated COVID-19 vaccine




PULLMAN, Wash. -- Washington State fired football coach Nick Rolovich and four of his assistants on Monday after they refused to comply with a mandate that all state employees be vaccinated against COVID-19.
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee had set a deadline of Monday for thousands of state employees, including the Cougars' coaches, to be vaccinated against the coronavirus or risk losing their jobs.

"The noncompliance with this requirement renders [Rolovich] ineligible to be employed at Washington State University and therefore can no longer fulfill the duties as a head coach of our football program effective immediately," Washington State athletic director Pat Chun said during a Monday night news conference. "It is disheartening to be here today. Our football team is hurting. Our WSU community is fractured. Today will have a lasting impact on the young men on our team and the remaining coaches and staff."
Also fired were assistant coaches Ricky Logo, John Richardson, Craig Stutzmann and Mark Weber after they did not comply with Inslee's proclamation that was issued in August. Chun said there might be no precedent for a team losing its head coach and so many assistants in the middle of a season.
Defensive coordinator Jake Dickert has been elevated to interim head coach. His first game in charge will be Saturday at home against BYU.
Rolovich was the highest-paid state employee, with an annual salary of more than $3 million in a contract that runs through 2025. He had said he wouldn't get vaccinated but has declined to provide clarity when asked repeatedly for weeks to expand upon the reasoning for his refusal. The university provided multiple educational sessions for its coaches and staff about the vaccine, its efficacy and the process.
Chun confirmed Rolovich's departure will be characterized as a "for cause" separation due to his inability to meet the requirements outlined in his contract. As such, he will not continue to be paid as per the terms of his contract.
Rolovich, 42, initially said in mid-August he would comply with the vaccine mandate, but later confirmed he applied for a religious exemption. He has not specified his religious beliefs.
The university used a blind evaluation process, meaning the two-person committee that evaluated Rolovich's request did not have access to any identifying information while making its determination.
The committee returned its ruling Monday, and while Chun did not explicitly confirm how the committee ruled, it can be inferred the religious exemption was granted at that stage of the process because Chun said Rolovich's "accommodation request" was denied. The second step of the process, after the religious exemption was granted, would be for the supervisor -- in this case Chun and likely other university leaders -- to decide if accommodations could be made for Rolovich to fulfill all his contractual obligations.
Chun saying Rolovich's accommodation request was denied indicates an evaluation was made beyond the initial exemption request.
Rolovich was informed of his dismissal by Chun on Monday afternoon and left immediately after their meeting concluded, without addressing the team, Chun said. After meeting with Rolovich, Chun addressed the players in a meeting that was met with mixed emotions.
"Their responses were what you would expect out of a bunch of college-age young people that lost their head coach and a bunch of position coaches as well," Chun said. "That's a very close-knit group. They handled it maturely, but without a doubt there's a lot of disappointment, sadness, anger. It's a room filled with over 120 young people, so it's going to be the full spectrum of emotions. But they listened and they were all there."
It's unclear who will fill the five vacated spots on staff, which could be difficult considering the timing and that WSU's run-and-shoot offense isn't widely used (Rolovich, Stutzmann and Weber are offensive coaches).
"It's a very detailed, intricate offense, this run-and-shoot, and to get the right coaches that can help assist -- there just aren't a lot of people on the streets right now," Chun said. "We've been working on this for a couple weeks, just in case, and we'll go forward with a couple of those."
Rolovich revealed in July that he would not get vaccinated and couldn't attend Pac-12 media day in person because of it. He was the only unvaccinated head coach in the Pac-12 and had worn a mask during games.
Unlike last season -- when COVID-19 cases swept through major college football, postponing and canceling games weekly -- no games have needed to be rescheduled because of a coronavirus outbreak.

Rolovich was hired from Hawaii two years ago, after Mike Leach left for Mississippi State, and led Washington State to a 1-3 record in the Pac-12 in a 2020 season cut short because of the pandemic. Washington State has won its past three games and is 4-3 this season, including a 34-31 win over Stanford last Saturday. Rolovich finishes with a 5-6 record at the Pullman campus in southeastern Washington.
Dickert is in his second season as Washington State's defensive coordinator after three seasons at Wyoming. He has not previously been a head coach.
Washington State president Kirk Schulz said nearly 90% of WSU employees and 97% of students had been vaccinated.
Players stood up for Rolovich as the season progressed.
Cougars quarterback Jayden de Laura told a sideline reporter after Saturday's victory: "Stop hating on Rolo. We love him.''
Wide receiver Travell Harris commended Rolovich following the game for being a "players' coach.''
"He's a coach we all love to play for,'' Harris said.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

lavaflow99

In search of the next vacation
NYC has a local mandate in that you can't enter indoor stadiums and gyms without one dose of the vaccine. Kyrie Irving, basketball player on the Brooklyn Nets, doesn't want to get vaccinated. Therefore he is ineligible to play in 1/2 of the game of his team's schedule. Half!!! He can't even practice with the team indoors (they were briefly holding a few outdoor practices to accommodate him). :nono:

The Nets decided they had enough and said he can't be with the team in any capacity or play in road games unless he can be a full participant. AKA get the vaccine.

He is going to die on his anti-vaxx hill. :nono: He is going to lose checks with each game he misses.

Kyrie Irving vaccine stance: Everything to know, including fallout with Nets, New York mandate, NBA rules​

The Nets announced earlier this week that Irving won't play or practice until he's eligible for all games​



Kyrie Irving vaccine stance: Everything to know, including fallout with Nets, New York mandate, NBA rules​

The Nets announced earlier this week that Irving won't play or practice until he's eligible for all games​

[IMG alt=" Jasmyn Wimbish
"]https://sportshub.cbsistatic.com/i/r/2019/09/16/c59bd8c1-4673-45d8-82f0-be24998788e8/thumbnail/80x80/f2def4593e6a07ba2867cd5c0c488f48/jasmyn-wimbish-700.png[/IMG]


By Jasmyn Wimbish

Oct 19, 2021 at 2:58 pm ET9 min read




kyrie-irving.jpg
Getty Images
The 2021-22 NBA season is just days from tipping off, and while other teams in the league are focusing on their first game, the Brooklyn Nets are wondering when Kyrie Irving will play for the team this year. The Irving saga in Brooklyn added a surprising twist earlier this week when Nets general manager Sean Marks announced that Irving won't be permitted to practice with the team or play in road games until he is a "full participant" and eligible under New York City's local vaccine mandate.
New York City's vaccine mandate requires everyone to have at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in order to go to restaurants, bars, and in the case of NBA players, use indoor gyms which include Madison Square Garden and Barclays Center, the home of the Knicks and Nets, respectively.
In regards to Irving's situation, there's a lot of moving parts and information on his status going forward with the Nets. So to make it easier to digest all that information, here's everything we know about Irving's situation, what it means for the Nets and other players in the league.

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Why are the Nets prohibiting Irving from playing?​

Given New York's COVID-19 regulations, Irving isn't permitted to play in games in Brooklyn until he's received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Although he did receive permission to practice with the Nets in New York, the team clearly isn't interested in having him available for just half of the season's games. They're also not wanting the distraction that would inevitably stem from such a situation, something that Marks echoed during his press conference announcing the decision on Tuesday.

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"I think we all know what our objective is this year and how a decision like this maybe affects that ultimate objective," Marks said. "So they're never easy decisions, but, end of the day, I think we're looking at putting a group of people out there that are going to be able to participate fully. And that's what this comes down to, and we're not looking for partners that are going to be half-time.
"I don't think that would be fair, not only on the team and staff and ownership and fans, but, to be quite frank, not fair on Kyrie either," Marks continued. "When you're putting somebody out there that potentially can't get the right ramp-ups and right build-ups and so forth, and look as good as he or the team should under a different set of circumstances, that's why this decision was ultimately made."
Though Marks said this decision included input from several people, he and team owner Joe Tsai were the final decision-makers in prohibiting Irving from being a part-time player.

What's Irving's response to the Nets' decision?​

Though Irving hasn't talked to the media since the Nets announced their decision, he did go on Instagram Live Wednesday evening to discuss his thoughts on the entire situation. In addition to confirming that he is unvaccinated, Irving claimed that he was promised an exemption from the vaccine, and that he would be allowed to play this season.
"And I don't want to sit here and play on people's emotions, either," Irving said. "Just use logic. You know, what would you do? You know, if you felt uncomfortable going into the season, when you were promised that you would have exemptions or that you didn't have to be forced to get the vaccine. You know, this wasn't an issue before the season started. This wasn't something that I foresaw coming in where I prepared for it and I had a chance to strategize on what was going to be best for me and my family. I came into the season thinking that I was just gonna be able to play ball, you know, be able to use my talent to continue to inspire, influence people in the right way."
Details regarding what type of exemption Irving is referring to are unclear. Earlier in the offseason, Golden State Warriors forward Andrew Wiggins applied for a religious exemption, but was denied by the league and eventually decided to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Based on Irving's comments from his Instagram Live, it doesn't sound like he's planning on getting the vaccine anytime soon, but said his decision is "not about being anti-vax."

Is the vaccine mandate affecting other players/teams in the league?​

Due to the NBA not having its own vaccine mandate in place for players, this doesn't impact many players or teams across the league. There are currently three cities with vaccine mandates -- New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco -- which affects the Nets, Knicks, Lakers, Clippers and Golden State Warriors.
In New York, a player only has to receive one dose of a vaccine to fulfill the city's requirement, while in San Francisco a player must receive two doses. L.A.'s vaccine mandate will go into effect on Nov. 29, and similar to San Francisco's, requires that a person must be fully vaccinated to enter indoor gyms. However, that mandate won't apply to Staples Center, the home of the Lakers and Clippers, due to an existing health order issued by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) that covers the venue.

Per a release by Staples Center:
"STAPLES Center and Microsoft Theater will continue to follow the protocols established by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) which requires guests to show proof of being fully vaccinated or providing proof of a negative COVID-19 test 72 hours prior to the event date in addition to wearing approved face coverings when no actively eating or drinking. The Ordinance passed by the City of Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 6 does not apply to STAPLES Center or Microsoft Theater, who are already subject to an existing LACDPH order addressing this subject matter."
So theoretically a player on the Lakers or Clippers could choose to not get vaccinated and instead submit COVID-19 tests before games. However, on Media Day both the Lakers and Clippers said that they should both be at 100 percent vaccination rate before the start of the season. Similarly, the Knicks announced at Media Day that their whole roster is vaccinated, and after Wiggins finally decided to get the shot, the Warriors are now at 100 percent vaccination rate.
For unvaccinated players on teams that play in cities without vaccine mandates, they won't be restricted from playing in any games this season, even in New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco. However they will be subject to regular COVID-19 testing, be required to socially distance themselves from other players, and follow stricter guidelines on the road and at home.

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What financial ramifications come with Irving not playing?​

Per an agreement between the league and the National Basketball Players Association, unvaccinated players who will miss games due to local COVID-19 vaccine mandates stand to lose 1/91.6 of their salary for each game they are forced to miss. That number is based on preseason, regular season and potential playoff games, and teams won't get any salary cap relief for potential pay reductions.
For Irving, he stands to lose about $380K per home game. Marks said on Tuesday that Irving will still get paid for away games that he misses due to the team deciding to keep him away from the team.

Could the Nets trade Irving, or could he retire if he continues to be unvaccinated?​

During Marks' press conference to address the Nets' decision to keep Irving away from the team, a reporter asked if the team would look to move him due to his unwillingness to be made available for the team this season.

"I don't know that I want to address the hypotheticals of what may happen in the future here. ... The hope is that we have Kyrie back, we'll welcome him back in open arms under a different set of circumstances. And so we need to wait and see how that transpires, but in the meantime, we need to focus on the 16 players that are going to be on this roster moving forward with us, including our two-ways. So the focus needs to be with them and our goals have not changed. The goals, ultimately, still are to be the last team standing."
The idea of Brooklyn trading Irving has been floated around on social media, and one hypothetical was a potential Irving-for-Ben Simmons proposal to put an end to the current drama with the Philadelphia 76ers, and allow the Nets to move on without Irving. However, the Sixers have no interest in Irving at the moment, per The Athletic's Sam Amick.
In regards to Irving potentially retiring due to this entire situation, the All-Star guard shot down that possibility on Instagram Live.

"And no I'm not retiring, and no I'm not leaving this game like this," Irving said. "There's still so much more work to do and there's still so many other youngins to inspire. Because I know they want to be better than me. And I can't wait to play against all y'all on this stage."

How soon could Irving play if he gets vaccinated?​

Since New York City's vaccine mandate only requires proof of just one dose of a vaccine to play home games, Irving could theoretically get one dose on the day of the Nets home opener, which is set for Sunday, Oct. 24 against the Charlotte Hornets, and be eligible for that game. He would've been eligible to play in Brooklyn's first two games of the season since they are on the road against the Milwaukee Bucks and Sixers, but due to the team's decision to not allow him to compete at all until he's vaccinated, he won't be allowed to play in those at all.
However, even if Irving just got one dose of the vaccine, he would still be required to follow the league's strict guidelines for players who are not fully vaccinated. That would mean he would still be required to, among other things, social distance from teammates and undergo regular testing.

Who will fill Irving's role for Nets?​

Although the Nets would surely like to have Irving's talents in the starting lineup, this is without a doubt the deepest team in the league, and could probably still win a championship without him. In his absence, head coach Steve Nash will likely go to veteran guard and NBA champion Patty Mills to fill Irving's role. Mills won't match Irving's production, as his career averages of 8.9 points and 2.3 assists pale in comparison to the gaudy numbers Irving is capable of putting up.
But with Kevin Durant and James Harden, the Nets don't necessarily need Mills to average well above his career average. Even better, Mills is a player who can play well on or off the ball, and his ability to make 3s consistently will help the Nets spread the floor for Durant and Harden to attack the rim. Mills is also coming off an Olympic bronze medal with the Australian National Team where he had a standout tournament. Over six games he averaged a blistering 23.3 points, 6.3 assists and 3.5 assists, and showed that perhaps there's more to unlock to his game than we've seen over his 12-year career in the NBA.
He's never been a regular starter in his NBA career, but Mills has shown over the years that he's capable of filling that role. With Irving sidelined indefinitely, he'll now get that opportunity.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
NYC has a local mandate in that you can't enter indoor stadiums and gyms without one dose of the vaccine. Kyrie Irving, basketball player on the Brooklyn Nets, doesn't want to get vaccinated. Therefore he is ineligible to play in 1/2 of the game of his team's schedule. Half!!! He can't even practice with the team indoors (they were briefly holding a few outdoor practices to accommodate him). :nono:

The Nets decided they had enough and said he can't be with the team in any capacity or play in road games unless he can be a full participant. AKA get the vaccine.

He is going to die on his anti-vaxx hill. :nono: He is going to lose checks with each game he misses.

Kyrie Irving vaccine stance: Everything to know, including fallout with Nets, New York mandate, NBA rules​

The Nets announced earlier this week that Irving won't play or practice until he's eligible for all games​



Kyrie Irving vaccine stance: Everything to know, including fallout with Nets, New York mandate, NBA rules​

The Nets announced earlier this week that Irving won't play or practice until he's eligible for all games​

[IMG alt=" Jasmyn Wimbish
"]https://sportshub.cbsistatic.com/i/r/2019/09/16/c59bd8c1-4673-45d8-82f0-be24998788e8/thumbnail/80x80/f2def4593e6a07ba2867cd5c0c488f48/jasmyn-wimbish-700.png[/IMG]


By Jasmyn Wimbish

Oct 19, 2021 at 2:58 pm ET9 min read




kyrie-irving.jpg
Getty Images
The 2021-22 NBA season is just days from tipping off, and while other teams in the league are focusing on their first game, the Brooklyn Nets are wondering when Kyrie Irving will play for the team this year. The Irving saga in Brooklyn added a surprising twist earlier this week when Nets general manager Sean Marks announced that Irving won't be permitted to practice with the team or play in road games until he is a "full participant" and eligible under New York City's local vaccine mandate.
New York City's vaccine mandate requires everyone to have at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in order to go to restaurants, bars, and in the case of NBA players, use indoor gyms which include Madison Square Garden and Barclays Center, the home of the Knicks and Nets, respectively.
In regards to Irving's situation, there's a lot of moving parts and information on his status going forward with the Nets. So to make it easier to digest all that information, here's everything we know about Irving's situation, what it means for the Nets and other players in the league.

CBS Sports HQ Newsletter​

We bring sports news that matters to your inbox, to help you stay informed and get a winning edge.​

By submitting my email I agree to receive the "CBS Sports HQ Newsletter" and other marketing and promotional emails from CBS Sports, which may include information from our affiliates and/or partners' offers, products and services. For more information about our data practices consult our Privacy Policy

Why are the Nets prohibiting Irving from playing?​

Given New York's COVID-19 regulations, Irving isn't permitted to play in games in Brooklyn until he's received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Although he did receive permission to practice with the Nets in New York, the team clearly isn't interested in having him available for just half of the season's games. They're also not wanting the distraction that would inevitably stem from such a situation, something that Marks echoed during his press conference announcing the decision on Tuesday.

Sponsored by OrthoBethesda
Join the Maryland Connect Referrals Network
Join us on Maryland Connect and become a referring provider of OrthoBethesda! Already a referrer? Join and streamline the referral process! ⬇️
SEE MORE

"I think we all know what our objective is this year and how a decision like this maybe affects that ultimate objective," Marks said. "So they're never easy decisions, but, end of the day, I think we're looking at putting a group of people out there that are going to be able to participate fully. And that's what this comes down to, and we're not looking for partners that are going to be half-time.
"I don't think that would be fair, not only on the team and staff and ownership and fans, but, to be quite frank, not fair on Kyrie either," Marks continued. "When you're putting somebody out there that potentially can't get the right ramp-ups and right build-ups and so forth, and look as good as he or the team should under a different set of circumstances, that's why this decision was ultimately made."
Though Marks said this decision included input from several people, he and team owner Joe Tsai were the final decision-makers in prohibiting Irving from being a part-time player.

What's Irving's response to the Nets' decision?​

Though Irving hasn't talked to the media since the Nets announced their decision, he did go on Instagram Live Wednesday evening to discuss his thoughts on the entire situation. In addition to confirming that he is unvaccinated, Irving claimed that he was promised an exemption from the vaccine, and that he would be allowed to play this season.
"And I don't want to sit here and play on people's emotions, either," Irving said. "Just use logic. You know, what would you do? You know, if you felt uncomfortable going into the season, when you were promised that you would have exemptions or that you didn't have to be forced to get the vaccine. You know, this wasn't an issue before the season started. This wasn't something that I foresaw coming in where I prepared for it and I had a chance to strategize on what was going to be best for me and my family. I came into the season thinking that I was just gonna be able to play ball, you know, be able to use my talent to continue to inspire, influence people in the right way."
Details regarding what type of exemption Irving is referring to are unclear. Earlier in the offseason, Golden State Warriors forward Andrew Wiggins applied for a religious exemption, but was denied by the league and eventually decided to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Based on Irving's comments from his Instagram Live, it doesn't sound like he's planning on getting the vaccine anytime soon, but said his decision is "not about being anti-vax."

Is the vaccine mandate affecting other players/teams in the league?​

Due to the NBA not having its own vaccine mandate in place for players, this doesn't impact many players or teams across the league. There are currently three cities with vaccine mandates -- New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco -- which affects the Nets, Knicks, Lakers, Clippers and Golden State Warriors.
In New York, a player only has to receive one dose of a vaccine to fulfill the city's requirement, while in San Francisco a player must receive two doses. L.A.'s vaccine mandate will go into effect on Nov. 29, and similar to San Francisco's, requires that a person must be fully vaccinated to enter indoor gyms. However, that mandate won't apply to Staples Center, the home of the Lakers and Clippers, due to an existing health order issued by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) that covers the venue.

Per a release by Staples Center:
"STAPLES Center and Microsoft Theater will continue to follow the protocols established by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) which requires guests to show proof of being fully vaccinated or providing proof of a negative COVID-19 test 72 hours prior to the event date in addition to wearing approved face coverings when no actively eating or drinking. The Ordinance passed by the City of Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 6 does not apply to STAPLES Center or Microsoft Theater, who are already subject to an existing LACDPH order addressing this subject matter."
So theoretically a player on the Lakers or Clippers could choose to not get vaccinated and instead submit COVID-19 tests before games. However, on Media Day both the Lakers and Clippers said that they should both be at 100 percent vaccination rate before the start of the season. Similarly, the Knicks announced at Media Day that their whole roster is vaccinated, and after Wiggins finally decided to get the shot, the Warriors are now at 100 percent vaccination rate.
For unvaccinated players on teams that play in cities without vaccine mandates, they won't be restricted from playing in any games this season, even in New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco. However they will be subject to regular COVID-19 testing, be required to socially distance themselves from other players, and follow stricter guidelines on the road and at home.

Sponsored by OrthoBethesda
Join the Maryland Connect Referrals Network
Join us on Maryland Connect and become a referring provider of OrthoBethesda! Already a referrer? Join and streamline the referral process! ⬇️
SEE MORE

What financial ramifications come with Irving not playing?​

Per an agreement between the league and the National Basketball Players Association, unvaccinated players who will miss games due to local COVID-19 vaccine mandates stand to lose 1/91.6 of their salary for each game they are forced to miss. That number is based on preseason, regular season and potential playoff games, and teams won't get any salary cap relief for potential pay reductions.
For Irving, he stands to lose about $380K per home game. Marks said on Tuesday that Irving will still get paid for away games that he misses due to the team deciding to keep him away from the team.

Could the Nets trade Irving, or could he retire if he continues to be unvaccinated?​

During Marks' press conference to address the Nets' decision to keep Irving away from the team, a reporter asked if the team would look to move him due to his unwillingness to be made available for the team this season.

"I don't know that I want to address the hypotheticals of what may happen in the future here. ... The hope is that we have Kyrie back, we'll welcome him back in open arms under a different set of circumstances. And so we need to wait and see how that transpires, but in the meantime, we need to focus on the 16 players that are going to be on this roster moving forward with us, including our two-ways. So the focus needs to be with them and our goals have not changed. The goals, ultimately, still are to be the last team standing."
The idea of Brooklyn trading Irving has been floated around on social media, and one hypothetical was a potential Irving-for-Ben Simmons proposal to put an end to the current drama with the Philadelphia 76ers, and allow the Nets to move on without Irving. However, the Sixers have no interest in Irving at the moment, per The Athletic's Sam Amick.
In regards to Irving potentially retiring due to this entire situation, the All-Star guard shot down that possibility on Instagram Live.

"And no I'm not retiring, and no I'm not leaving this game like this," Irving said. "There's still so much more work to do and there's still so many other youngins to inspire. Because I know they want to be better than me. And I can't wait to play against all y'all on this stage."

How soon could Irving play if he gets vaccinated?​

Since New York City's vaccine mandate only requires proof of just one dose of a vaccine to play home games, Irving could theoretically get one dose on the day of the Nets home opener, which is set for Sunday, Oct. 24 against the Charlotte Hornets, and be eligible for that game. He would've been eligible to play in Brooklyn's first two games of the season since they are on the road against the Milwaukee Bucks and Sixers, but due to the team's decision to not allow him to compete at all until he's vaccinated, he won't be allowed to play in those at all.
However, even if Irving just got one dose of the vaccine, he would still be required to follow the league's strict guidelines for players who are not fully vaccinated. That would mean he would still be required to, among other things, social distance from teammates and undergo regular testing.

Who will fill Irving's role for Nets?​

Although the Nets would surely like to have Irving's talents in the starting lineup, this is without a doubt the deepest team in the league, and could probably still win a championship without him. In his absence, head coach Steve Nash will likely go to veteran guard and NBA champion Patty Mills to fill Irving's role. Mills won't match Irving's production, as his career averages of 8.9 points and 2.3 assists pale in comparison to the gaudy numbers Irving is capable of putting up.
But with Kevin Durant and James Harden, the Nets don't necessarily need Mills to average well above his career average. Even better, Mills is a player who can play well on or off the ball, and his ability to make 3s consistently will help the Nets spread the floor for Durant and Harden to attack the rim. Mills is also coming off an Olympic bronze medal with the Australian National Team where he had a standout tournament. Over six games he averaged a blistering 23.3 points, 6.3 assists and 3.5 assists, and showed that perhaps there's more to unlock to his game than we've seen over his 12-year career in the NBA.
He's never been a regular starter in his NBA career, but Mills has shown over the years that he's capable of filling that role. With Irving sidelined indefinitely, he'll now get that opportunity.
This the same guy who swears the earth is flat.
Like BYE.
 
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