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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
My niece's school has offered PCR testing once a week since opening. This was appreciated because it's an oral swab and I've already mentioned how traumatic the nasal swab has been for my 4 year old niece. Well earlier this week we were informed that test results will be delayed from 48 hours to nearly a week due to covid hitting the testing provider. Yesterday afternoon the school informed us that the testing provider has cancelled on-site testing for next week and the school is switching to virtual as a result of this and the delayed test results.

I understand but I worry about her missing so much school. The last time she was out, virtual class consisted of a 30 minute story time session and a 30 minute one-on-one session which didn't take since it was a new teacher. I'm going to look into resources we can use at home to support her learning.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
TLDR - Wear a N95 or a foreign equivalent. If you can't do this, second best is double masking with a multi-layered, snug fitting cloth mask on top of a surgical mask. Cloth alone is better than nothing but not enough against omicron.

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Why Cloth Masks Might Not Be Enough as Omicron Spreads

With the new Covid-19 variant surging, doctors advise doubling up or trying N95 masks.

Doctors and healthcare systems say it might be time to change your face masks.

With infections surging due to the fast-spreading Omicron variant, including among the vaccinated, physicians are now urging people to ditch cloth face masks, which they say may not provide enough protection against the virus. Instead, they recommend pairing cloth masks with surgical models or moving on to stronger respirator masks.

The Mayo Clinic began on Thursday requiring all patients and visitors to wear surgical masks or N95 or KN95 masks. Anyone wearing a single-layer, homemade cloth mask, gaiter or bandanna, or a mask with a vent, will be provided a medical-grade mask to wear over it.

Single-layer cloth masks, which many people prefer for comfort and style, can block larger droplets carrying the virus, but aren’t as effective in blocking smaller aerosols or particles carrying the virus, according to infectious-disease specialists.

Breaking Down a KN95 Mask​

Because KN95 marks have a filter layer made of polypropylene, which is a type of plastic, they are effective at trapping small particles. The extra layer provides a higher level of protection against Covid-19 when compared to cloth or surgical masks.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s most recent guidance recommends that people wear masks, including cloth ones that are multilayered and tightly woven, that fit snugly and have an adjustable wire nose bridge. It also suggests layering masks, using a disposable mask underneath a cloth mask and reserving N95 masks for healthcare workers.

But many professionals in the field say certain masks are more effective than others in protecting people from the Omicron variant and that cloth masks alone aren’t.

“If you really want no exposure, you have to wear the right type of mask,” says Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease specialist at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Gandhi recommends N95 masks, which are certified in the U.S., or the KN95, KF94 and FFP2 masks, which are certified in China, South Korea and Europe respectively. If those aren’t available, she recommends double masking—a multilayered cloth mask tightly on top of a surgical mask. Surgical masks are made of polypropylene, which has electrostatic charge characteristics that block the virus.

“If everyone is just wearing a cloth mask or just a surgical mask, it won’t make any difference” with this highly-transmissible variant, she says.

Others in the field say high-quality surgical masks, worn properly, offer protection, but they would also like more data and research on how they stand up against Omicron.

N95 masks, which are certified by the U.S. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, have a denser network of fibers than surgical or cloth masks. That tighter mesh, together with an electrostatic charge in the material, generally makes such masks the most efficient at trapping larger droplets and aerosols that are exhaled by the wearer. They also better block such particles from being inhaled.

Properly fitted, certified N95 masks can filter up to 95% of particles in the air.

“Any mask is better than no mask. But cloth masks and then surgical masks are not as good as N95-caliber masks,” says Ranu Dhillon, a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Megan Srinivas, a clinician and infectious disease specialist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says she and other family members wear KN95 masks, which have five layers of overlapping material and a tighter fit to reduce droplets from escaping or entering. She would recommend those same masks, which come in children’s sizes, to parents getting ready to send their children to school in the new year. If those aren’t available, she suggests disposable authorized surgical masks.

“We need to educate the public and say that different quality masks offer different protection,” she says.

Graham Snyder, medical director of infection prevention and hospital epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center , says any quality mask that offers an effective seal and is worn correctly—covering the nose and mouth—offers protection.

Dr. Snyder says he would like data from the CDC on how Omicron spreads and whether the transmission is related to the types of masks. He is concerned about the number of people in the community who don’t wear masks of any type.

“Masking works. Period,” he says.
 

MamaBear2012

Well-Known Member
Well isn't it awesome that the CDC reported this on a Friday after kids have started back to school after a break? People keep saying, "Oh, but for the most part symptoms are mild," but we have no idea about the long-term effects on both adults and children.

Covid may raise the risk of diabetes in children, C.D.C. researchers reported.​


By Roni Caryn Rabin

Jan. 7, 2022

Children who have recovered from Covid-19 appear to be at significantly increased risk of developing Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Friday.

A heightened risk of diabetes has already been seen among adults who recovered from Covid, according to some studies. Researchers in Europe have reported an increase in the number of children being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes since the pandemic started.

But the C.D.C. study is among the first to examine large insurance claim databases in the United States to estimate the prevalence of new diabetes diagnoses in children under age 18 who had Covid or were known to be infected with the coronavirus.

The study used two claim databases from U.S. health plans to look at diabetes diagnoses made in youngsters under 18 over the course of a year or more, starting in March 1, 2020, comparing those who had Covid with those who did not.

The researchers found increases in diabetes in both data sets, though the relative rates were quite different: they found a 2.6-fold increase in new diabetes cases among children in one, and a smaller 30 percent increase in another.

“Even a 30 percent increase is a big increase in risk,” said Sharon Saydah, a researcher at the C.D.C. and lead author of the study. The differences likely result from different ways of classifying children as having Covid, she added.

Dr. Saydah said it was not yet clear whether post-Covid Type 2 diabetes would be a chronic condition in these children, or a transient condition that resolves. (Type 1 diabetes is not reversible.) Most of the children were only followed about four and a half months.

The finding underscores the importance of vaccinating all eligible children against Covid, she added, and using measures like masking and distancing, especially to protect the youngest, who cannot yet be vaccinated.

“It’s really important for clinicians, pediatricians and parents to be aware of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, so they can get their kids diagnosed,” Dr. Saydah said. Increased thirst, frequent urination, unintentional weight loss and fatigue are among the telltale symptoms.

She noted that weight gain and sedentary behavior, which have increased during the pandemic, are also risk factors for Type 2 diabetes.

Many of the children in the study were only diagnosed after having an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening complication that occurs when the body doesn’t have enough insulin to allow blood sugar into cells to use for energy.

Dr. Saydah and her colleagues did not distinguish between types of diabetes, including both Type 1 and Type 2 in their analysis. The increases were seen both among those who had been ill with Covid, and those who were asymptomatic but tested positive.

Another study, also released on Friday by the C.D.C., found that two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine protected hospitalized youngsters between the ages of 12 and 18 against severe multisystem inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C, which can develop two to six weeks after infection with the virus.

The study looked at 24 hospitals in 20 states between July and Dec. 9, 2021, during the period when the Delta variant was dominant. It concluded that vaccination had an efficacy rate of 91 percent against MIS-C, and noted that among 38 hospitalized patients aged 12 to 18 who required life support, all were unvaccinated.
 

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
This Nurse Practitioner I was talking to told me that it is common for vaxxed people with covid (and now me) to have a fever for 10 days. I did not know this.
And sure enough I am at day 9-10 and my fever just now went away on its own.

Those chills I had shook some weight off of me which I appreciate :giggle:
I still cough about 3x a day.
I am off of quarantine tomorrow and have a PCR test scheduled.



Side note, I knew icu patients can have a fever for 30+ days but those are severe cases.
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
I just want to share this. The unit I work on is 2 floors. Several co workers tested positive for COVID since the 31. On both floors. We are all vaccinated and for the most part healthy except some of us are chubby :look: . Therefore no worker had major illnesses so far because of COVID. Just flu like symptoms or no symptoms at all. Just positive tests.

The outbreak is currently on 1 floor with 8 patients being positive so far since Friday this week (3 days ago) and 2 dead so far after showing symptoms or positive tests for only 1 day. The 2 dead are the ones with the most comorbidities.

But this is where it gets interesting. There is one patient on this floor who never got the vaccine. I think he is the common denominator. He was always up in everyone’s face trying to be helpful and acting like he is part of the staff. We allowed him to do this. To make him feel worthy and to respect his dignity as a human being. However I had infection control concerns with how he was allowed to interact with the other patients and raised them several times with the directors. They were not addressed or if they were it was superficial. So this one patient is obviously the super spreader. He has been the sickest. He was isolated as soon as he exhibited symptoms. Since Xmas or before. But he kept coming back negative until last week.

My theory is that he is responsible for all the infections and deaths on this one floor. The current evidence suggests that the unvaccinated are more likely to be infected longer and therefore have a longer viral load. I think he was infected by staff and he then infected the other patients through his interactions - which I had concerns about. The patients do not wear masks around each other. But the staff wear masks at all times. It will eventually get to the other floor. We are short staffed and cannot keep workers on one floor.

Another interesting thing I realized. Many COVID deaths have not/will not be documented as COVID deaths (in Ca) if the patient is elderly with underlying co-morbidities. That is the new thing since 2021.
 

sunshinebeautiful

Well-Known Member
I just want to share this. The unit I work on is 2 floors. Several co workers tested positive for COVID since the 31. On both floors. We are all vaccinated and for the most part healthy except some of us are chubby :look: . Therefore no worker had major illnesses so far because of COVID. Just flu like symptoms or no symptoms at all. Just positive tests.

The outbreak is currently on 1 floor with 8 patients being positive so far since Friday this week (3 days ago) and 2 dead so far after showing symptoms or positive tests for only 1 day. The 2 dead are the ones with the most comorbidities.

But this is where it gets interesting. There is one patient on this floor who never got the vaccine. I think he is the common denominator. He was always up in everyone’s face trying to be helpful and acting like he is part of the staff. We allowed him to do this. To make him feel worthy and to respect his dignity as a human being. However I had infection control concerns with how he was allowed to interact with the other patients and raised them several times with the directors. They were not addressed or if they were it was superficial. So this one patient is obviously the super spreader. He has been the sickest. He was isolated as soon as he exhibited symptoms. Since Xmas or before. But he kept coming back negative until last week.

My theory is that he is responsible for all the infections and deaths on this one floor. The current evidence suggests that the unvaccinated are more likely to be infected longer and therefore have a longer viral load. I think he was infected by staff and he then infected the other patients through his interactions - which I had concerns about. The patients do not wear masks around each other. But the staff wear masks at all times. It will eventually get to the other floor. We are short staffed and cannot keep workers on one floor.

Another interesting thing I realized. Many COVID deaths have not/will not be documented as COVID deaths (in Ca) if the patient is elderly with underlying co-morbidities. That is the new thing since 2021.

Dang, you really tried to sound the alarm about this patient but was ignored. I'm sitting here reading like how is he allowed to be all up in everyone's faces like this in a hospital? :nono:

Wow, really at the bolded! I would think that most elderly patients would have underlying comorbidities.
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
Dang, you really tried to sound the alarm about this patient but was ignored. I'm sitting here reading like how is he allowed to be all up in everyone's faces like this in a hospital? :nono:

Wow, really at the bolded! I would think that most elderly patients would have underlying comorbidities.
My director is incompetent. To the point of one of his own people asking me in all seriousness last night if he was “special” he has white male privileges. I have never seen this so obvious and up close like this. He was a student nurse. Then hired and was a director in no time. I am finding it hard to not show how much I think I am working with an idiot.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I’m so tired of hearing that we should be wearing N95s when the only ones readily available are counterfeits. :pullhair:
I have some KN95's DH ordered from Amazon that are kind of suspect but I've been wearing that ON TOP of a medical grade one the last couple days. We have tons of disposable medical grade ones at the house so I've been back to double layering for a few months now after slacking off. I'm gonna grab some good N95s from my local drug store. Whatever the cost. I have a few 3M brand N95s left from work that are legit as well but I've been rationing them and layering as well. I'll tell him to get either 3M or Honeywell from now on. I asked him to order some and didn't really OVERSEE....and what showed up at the house the other day had me going.....errrrrkay...
 

awhyley

Well-Known Member
Plenty of places have them … I bought a bunch from here mid 2021 and they still have them.


Bless you cause I'm trying to get a few from overseas. My sis came down with Covid on Saturday, so we're now extra cautious.

Another interesting thing I realized. Many COVID deaths have not/will not be documented as COVID deaths (in Ca) if the patient is elderly with underlying co-morbidities. That is the new thing since 2021.

Boy, there're really trying to keep this thing (information) from spreading. That is clearly wrong, cause now we'll be comparing apples and oranges in terms of cases per years.
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
Bless you cause I'm trying to get a few from overseas. My sis came down with Covid on Saturday, so we're now extra cautious.



Boy, there're really trying to keep this thing (information) from spreading. That is clearly wrong, cause now we'll be comparing apples and oranges in terms of cases per years.
Yup. Both cases should have gone to the coroner’s to decide. But when we contacted them they came back stating that the had comorbidities. Which is bull. Yes they had comorbidities but corona took them earlier. Whether it was one week or one year it took them out earlier. so the death certificates are no longer stating corona in some areas.
 

Lylddlebit

Well-Known Member
I just want to share this. The unit I work on is 2 floors. Several co workers tested positive for COVID since the 31. On both floors. We are all vaccinated and for the most part healthy except some of us are chubby :look: . Therefore no worker had major illnesses so far because of COVID. Just flu like symptoms or no symptoms at all. Just positive tests.

The outbreak is currently on 1 floor with 8 patients being positive so far since Friday this week (3 days ago) and 2 dead so far after showing symptoms or positive tests for only 1 day. The 2 dead are the ones with the most comorbidities.

But this is where it gets interesting. There is one patient on this floor who never got the vaccine. I think he is the common denominator. He was always up in everyone’s face trying to be helpful and acting like he is part of the staff. We allowed him to do this. To make him feel worthy and to respect his dignity as a human being. However I had infection control concerns with how he was allowed to interact with the other patients and raised them several times with the directors. They were not addressed or if they were it was superficial. So this one patient is obviously the super spreader. He has been the sickest. He was isolated as soon as he exhibited symptoms. Since Xmas or before. But he kept coming back negative until last week.

My theory is that he is responsible for all the infections and deaths on this one floor. The current evidence suggests that the unvaccinated are more likely to be infected longer and therefore have a longer viral load. I think he was infected by staff and he then infected the other patients through his interactions - which I had concerns about. The patients do not wear masks around each other. But the staff wear masks at all times. It will eventually get to the other floor. We are short staffed and cannot keep workers on one floor.

Another interesting thing I realized. Many COVID deaths have not/will not be documented as COVID deaths (in Ca) if the patient is elderly with underlying co-morbidities. That is the new thing since 2021.
It's not new at all. Someone near and dear to me died of covid in August 2020 and the cause of death on the death certificate was heart failure. He had the symptoms of covid when he was admitted into the hospital. That is why he got admitted. They been sugarcoating it.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
It's not new at all. Someone near and dear to me died of covid in August 2020 and the cause of death on the death certificate was heart failure. He had the symptoms of covid when he was admitted into the hospital. That is why he got admitted. They been sugarcoating it.
Did he have a positive test? I’ve seen this happen when someone dies before the test result comes back. The death certificate says something other than covid. Idk if any effort is made after the fact to change it once the positive result comes back.
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
Did he have a positive test? I’ve seen this happen when someone dies before the test result comes back. The death certificate says something other than covid. Idk if any effort is made after the fact to change it once the positive result comes back.
In both my case the tests were positive (rapid and then lab) but the death certificates will state their comorbidities as cause of death- as per their physicIan’s, coroner office public and current public health guidelines.
 
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naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
So I def had a good cry yesterday. No one died ya'll I'm just tired....

I had to gently as possibly chew out my mom (no yelling) bc she spent NYE/New Years day and after with her friends at the Hardrock and the hotel. She facetimed me yesterday about it and told me she was staying there. She also told me her husband has COVID and has been very sick since he tested positive on Tuesday. I was like...um...did you test: Her: "No! I feel fine." Me: (sigh)--"okaaay...but mom you could be positive and spreading it to your friends. Protocol dictates you're presumptive positive and he is SYMPTOMATIC....Remember, this is how its spread because some people never have symptoms." She also fibbed bout having access to a test (of course cause lines are crowded now)....But then when I called my sister who forgot to tell me our stepdad was sick (he has severe asthma, and he is fine)....she said--no I thought mom used the other home test I dropped everything in the middle of work last week to drop off at their house.... She left town 2 days after his positive test. Not 5 days. he is still very symptomatic.


Not to mention my unvaxxed cousins who party a lot who are now sick with COVID---but not before coming to my granny's house where my dad and his wife live to keep granny company. My dad is under prostate cancer treatment and his wife, she has health issues. The cousins came by on Christmas and were positive by the 27th with moderate symptoms. My dad complained of mild cold symptoms but initiated his health/herbs/supplement protocol and says he felt much better within a day. He is vaccinated. I told him not to let anyone in that house who is not masked. He didn't know this about cancer anyways because he said they were all over there hugging and kissing everyone. He will tell granny who will lay down the law cause her oldest and favorite granddaughter says so. She is also the family mouthpiece. They know cuz is crazy and can make a 7 hour drive in 5 on 1 tank of gas as well.

But I'm tired cause Omicron done took out 2 staff members, we got 3 more out pending test results this fine Monday morning. Another is out bc the vaccine booster had her sick. One needing to go home NOW bc the vaccine made her sick as well. So we are stretched thinner than again. I'm tired because the last 2 weeks I've been coming home like a zombie pushing myself through the holidays and I got reckless blood relations including my mom who isn't aware she needs to sacrifice partying....and is looking to go on a cruise with her same friends in 2 weeks. Its free. We think we can talk her out of it. I'm just tired.

*its not the going out...its the going out when you have been exposed to a SYMPTOMATIC positive person*

We thought by 2022 we'd be winding down as a conservative prediction. I'm pushing this out to 2024/2025 with how people behave alone. Vaccines won't save us. Behaviors are killing us.
So my mom and I talked yesterday after me avoiding her for 1 week. I'm undone.

We talked for an hour yesterday and she swears that she "misheard me" when I asked if she "didn't take a test because she 'felt fine.' after her husband tested positive. Then she alludes to the fact that her friends were sitting right there in front of her and she didn't want to go into details. My husband made me feel bad for avoiding her because his mother recently passed and that's the only mom I have---Like FACTS. But I legit had what I think was a nervous breakdown somewhere between Friday and Saturday and so because I'm pretty sure my biochemistry was off, I was out of anything positive to do or say and I had just enough energy to tend to my family. Like I couldn't bare anything else. Week 1 of this year was literally a nightmare...NOT TO MENTION I got a silk press for the 1st time in 6 years on Friday afternoon and by Sunday it was puffed up. So you KNNNNOOOOWWW ya girl was a lil salty about that!!!!!!!

Then mom calls to tell me about this cruise her friends are paying for...Like se forgot she told me so she called me just now to "remind me." She swore she'd be careful, and I just told her to check CDC recommendations. I told her about possible excursion cancellations if the folk on the boat have too man breakthrough infections, and having to stay adrift until your scheduled return or whatever. But she told me she has to "think positively" and that she can't hear that right now.

I'm about to go into a board meeting right now...but I don't know. Admittingly mom wears the equivalent of a Hazmat to Walmart and so are her little friends. But still....its my mom and I don't need this kind of stress. But I'm not saying **** else about it. My mental health is on ice right now.
 

Everything Zen

Well-Known Member
:bighug: @naturalgyrl5199. You’re not alone- I think there’s a sense of unease going around right now.

I’m right there with you. I’m over here on week 2 of that new high priced job and crying into my lunch I’m so burnt out and overwhelmed with family stress and demands, coming up on year 2 of this pandemic, every time I look at a new SOP to read I just start sobbing. It was nice that the head of US Operations saw me on our video 1:1 and said with a big smile on her face several times: “You don’t know how happy I am to see YOUR FACE on the other side of my screen SEVERAL TIMES during our call that just reminded me of how much I as a black woman have carried and overcome and thrived in spite of for so long and my mood was soooo low during the call but I felt some relief after that conversation.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
:bighug: @naturalgyrl5199. You’re not alone- I think there’s a sense of unease going around right now.

I’m right there with you. I’m over here on week 2 of that new high priced job and crying into my lunch I’m so burnt out and overwhelmed with family stress and demands, coming up on year 2 of this pandemic, every time I look at a new SOP to read I just start sobbing. It was nice that the head of US Operations saw me on our video 1:1 and said with a big smile on her face several times: “You don’t know how happy I am to see YOUR FACE on the other side of my screen SEVERAL TIMES during our call that just reminded me of how much I as a black woman have carried and overcome and thrived in spite of for so long and my mood was soooo low during the call but I felt some relief after that conversation.
Thanks for your kind words....and I'm glad your face made the US Operations Head smile. Lord knows we need to infiltrate, infiltrate, infiltrate!!!!
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Soooo

One of my staff with COVID+ came in this morning to pick up her laptop to work from home shared (at a distance) early this AM that her initial symptoms were a stomach bug. She said she thought she got it from her dogs and cats who had been throwing up, hacking and coughing.. That grossed me out entirely....but that article reminded me of that conversation just this morning. Pretty sure her animals have COVID. She was in a separate office logging on to the laptop from the network so we were well away but could hear her.

She was the one who came to work last Monday with a tummy ache and went home. Took 3 days of calls and texts to convince her to take a COVID test, which came out positive. Then she drops that bomb this morning.
 

nyeredzi

Well-Known Member
Well isn't it awesome that the CDC reported this on a Friday after kids have started back to school after a break? People keep saying, "Oh, but for the most part symptoms are mild," but we have no idea about the long-term effects on both adults and children.

Covid may raise the risk of diabetes in children, C.D.C. researchers reported.​


By Roni Caryn Rabin

Jan. 7, 2022

Children who have recovered from Covid-19 appear to be at significantly increased risk of developing Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Friday.

A heightened risk of diabetes has already been seen among adults who recovered from Covid, according to some studies. Researchers in Europe have reported an increase in the number of children being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes since the pandemic started.

But the C.D.C. study is among the first to examine large insurance claim databases in the United States to estimate the prevalence of new diabetes diagnoses in children under age 18 who had Covid or were known to be infected with the coronavirus.

The study used two claim databases from U.S. health plans to look at diabetes diagnoses made in youngsters under 18 over the course of a year or more, starting in March 1, 2020, comparing those who had Covid with those who did not.

The researchers found increases in diabetes in both data sets, though the relative rates were quite different: they found a 2.6-fold increase in new diabetes cases among children in one, and a smaller 30 percent increase in another.

“Even a 30 percent increase is a big increase in risk,” said Sharon Saydah, a researcher at the C.D.C. and lead author of the study. The differences likely result from different ways of classifying children as having Covid, she added.

Dr. Saydah said it was not yet clear whether post-Covid Type 2 diabetes would be a chronic condition in these children, or a transient condition that resolves. (Type 1 diabetes is not reversible.) Most of the children were only followed about four and a half months.

The finding underscores the importance of vaccinating all eligible children against Covid, she added, and using measures like masking and distancing, especially to protect the youngest, who cannot yet be vaccinated.

“It’s really important for clinicians, pediatricians and parents to be aware of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, so they can get their kids diagnosed,” Dr. Saydah said. Increased thirst, frequent urination, unintentional weight loss and fatigue are among the telltale symptoms.

She noted that weight gain and sedentary behavior, which have increased during the pandemic, are also risk factors for Type 2 diabetes.

Many of the children in the study were only diagnosed after having an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening complication that occurs when the body doesn’t have enough insulin to allow blood sugar into cells to use for energy.

Dr. Saydah and her colleagues did not distinguish between types of diabetes, including both Type 1 and Type 2 in their analysis. The increases were seen both among those who had been ill with Covid, and those who were asymptomatic but tested positive.

Another study, also released on Friday by the C.D.C., found that two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine protected hospitalized youngsters between the ages of 12 and 18 against severe multisystem inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C, which can develop two to six weeks after infection with the virus.

The study looked at 24 hospitals in 20 states between July and Dec. 9, 2021, during the period when the Delta variant was dominant. It concluded that vaccination had an efficacy rate of 91 percent against MIS-C, and noted that among 38 hospitalized patients aged 12 to 18 who required life support, all were unvaccinated.

I read the MMWR, and am having a hard time understanding how a causal link is demonstrated. I'm not actually sure they are asserting causation, but I can't tell for sure. Like, if obesity is a very common comorbidity for both diabetes and covid, might the covid-positive group (leaving out I'm sure many kids who got it but who did not get tested because of low/no symptoms) be more likely to get covid because they are obese, and also more likely to get diabetes because they are obese? I'm having a hard time understanding if covid itself is causing more diabetes, or just that both covid and diabetes are higher in the same population, e.g. those who are obese???
 

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
I read the MMWR, and am having a hard time understanding how a causal link is demonstrated. I'm not actually sure they are asserting causation, but I can't tell for sure. Like, if obesity is a very common comorbidity for both diabetes and covid, might the covid-positive group (leaving out I'm sure many kids who got it but who did not get tested because of low/no symptoms) be more likely to get covid because they are obese, and also more likely to get diabetes because they are obese? I'm having a hard time understanding if covid itself is causing more diabetes, or just that both covid and diabetes are higher in the same population, e.g. those who are obese???


They are saying covid is causing an increase in diabetes including Type 1 which is not linked to obesity. yes people and kids are obese and may get type 2 diabetes anyway but they are seeing an increase in both type of diabetes due to covid.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
I'm trying to remember where I've heard of this before. Maybe 15 years ago. Not sure if it was for health or beauty. I think there was a celebrity talking about it. Pam Grier?

ETA: Just googled. She used it on her face as a beauty treatment. She didn't drink it.
 
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