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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

brg240

Well-Known Member
Um does anyone see a shade room post in my last post bc the link is to a tweet? I'm very confused
 

shelli4018

Well-Known Member
This has not been helping my depression/anxiety :( which unfortunately has been back

Anyway, I still have to go to work. Some of the people I work with seem zero percent concerned about this. Including my office mate :confused: which leads me to believe she isn't taking proper precautions

I hope they let people work from home. Bc even if they don't let me. Having less points of contact would be better
We’re gonna have to share tips here for folk who are still working outside of their homes. What precautions are you taking so far? Cleaning work surfaces everyday? Wearing a mask? Are you 6 feet away from your nasty office mate?
 

awhyley

Well-Known Member
If you didn't get em out before Coronavirus, you may have to wait a while . . .

U.S. cities are temporarily banning evictions as coronavirus outbreak worsens


Several major cities across the U.S. have either issued temporary bans on evictions or are considering them as the novel coronavirus outbreak unfolds.

The San Jose City Council approved a proposal preventing evictions amid the coronavirus emergency, and San Francisco officials are putting forward similar legislation.

“We must avoid the creation of a greater public health emergency that would result from subjecting thousands more families to homelessness, and we must protect our residents from the fear of potential eviction resulting from economic dislocation,” San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo said when proposing the city’s temporary moratorium on evictions.

In other cities, mayors have declared states of emergency that bar evictions from moving forward. That’s the case in Miami-Dade County in Florida and in Baltimore.


Boston Mayor Martin Walsh told the Boston Herald that he had asked the Massachusetts court system “to offer leniency to those facing non-essential evictions” as consumer advocates called for a ban on the practice during the infectious disease pandemic.

In Washington State, which has one of the largest coronavirus clusters in the country, two major landlord groups, the Rental Housing Association of Washington and the Washington Multi-Family Housing Association, recommended a 30-day moratorium on evictions in King County, where Seattle is located, the Seattle Times first reported.

“A hold on physical evictions that allows court proceedings to continue has the dual benefit of keeping residents in their homes while opening paths to emergency rental assistance funds at the state and local level. The 30-day hold can be renewed each month based on the needs of the community and status of COVID-19 illnesses,” the Rental Housing Association of Washington said in a statement.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan has already used her authority to expand capacity for the city’s homeless shelters, and the city is also refraining from turning off power or water due to nonpayment during the coronavirus emergency, the Seattle Times reported.

In New York, state lawmakers have proposed legislation for a moratorium on evictions and foreclosures amid the illness outbreak. The city’s courts have implemented a temporary moratorium on evictions. Additionally, the Real Estate Board of New York, a trade group that represents major developers and property managers in the city, put a three-month moratorium on evictions.

A spokeswoman for the Philadelphia mayor’s office said the city is encouraging landlords “to recognize the extraordinary circumstances tenants may be facing by not adding housing insecurity to a family’s financial or health challenges.”

(The National Apartment Association did not immediately return a request for comment on eviction bans in light of the coronavirus.)

Evictions may not proceed normally even in cities that haven’t halted them, because court systems in many municipalities have either halted or scaled back operations during the outbreak.

Annually, there are around 3.6 million eviction filings in the U.S., which equates to about 300,000 filings per month on average, said Alieze Durana, spokeswoman for the Eviction Lab, an organization at Princeton University that researches eviction trends across the country.

For millions of Americans who work for hourly wages below $15 an hour and do not have paid sick leave or the option to work from home, the coronavirus outbreak could be devastating. The Eviction Lab’s data show that nearly 40% of eviction judgments are for less than $1,000, Durana said.

“We’re talking about people being really one rent payment away from an eviction judgment,” Durana said.

Avoiding evictions at a time when millions of people could lose income is also a matter of public health. “This pandemic is a stark reminder that housing is health care,” said Diane Yentel, president and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. “Policymakers at all levels should immediately implement moratoriums on foreclosures and evictions.”

Some hospitals and insurers in recent years have paid for patients’ housing costs as a part of their care, arguing that having a safe place to live improves patients’ health outcomes.

Going through the eviction process could expose more people to the coronavirus. Attending a court hearing regarding an eviction works against the recommendations health officials have made to practice social distancing in an effort to reduce transmission. The situation may only get worse if people are displaced from their homes.

“They could end up doubling up with friends and family, which would be concerning given that what we saw in the case of China was that the transmission of COVID-19 happened through families who were living together,” Durana said. She also added that sleeping in close quarters at homeless shelters is another source of concern.

“We live in extraordinary times, and I think our priority is to both ensure family and individual well-being and think about the larger public health picture,” she said.

Link: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u...RxGHsd3pqRDlObLZBP6Np49DetQPwEhMzo5AhP55VuIQ4
 

brg240

Well-Known Member
We’re gonna have to share tips here for folk who are still working outside of their homes. What precautions are you taking so far? Cleaning work surfaces everyday? Wearing a mask? Are you 6 feet away from your nasty office mate?
We are 6 feet away! I am so thankful that we have a little fake wall that separates our desks. It's about 8 ft tall and 4.5ft wide.
I am constantly washing my hands, I have hand sanatizer at my desk. I'm going to take some of the lysol wipes that are in each department put them in a container and keep them at my desk. I've been wiping down my desk at the end of the day but I think I'll do it 3 or 4 times a day. I have to set up for a lunch meeting tomorrow so I'll be using gloves (I rarely wear them bc I legit just open trays) Its Chick-fil-A so id usually grab leftovers. Definitely won't be doing that. I break our receptionist so I'll wipe down her desk/chair/phone before I use it.

When i get home after work after i take off my shoes ive been immediately washing my hands and then I change out of my work clothes.
 

shelli4018

Well-Known Member
I’ll be wearing mask and gloves today to do errands for my mom. I’m gonna feel silly. I can count on one hand the number of masks I’ve seen worn in public this week. Will be armed with lemon scented Lysol to spray her bags down. Pretty sure she’s gonna laugh at me. Lol! Have you guys noticed being adequately prepared feels foolish at first?
 

shelli4018

Well-Known Member
We are 6 feet away! I am so thankful that we have a little fake wall that separates our desks. It's about 8 ft tall and 4.5ft wide.
I am constantly washing my hands, I have hand sanatizer at my desk. I'm going to take some of the lysol wipes that are in each department put them in a container and keep them at my desk. I've been wiping down my desk at the end of the day but I think I'll do it 3 or 4 times a day. I have to set up for a lunch meeting tomorrow so I'll be using gloves (I rarely wear them bc I legit just open trays) Its Chick-fil-A so id usually grab leftovers. Definitely won't be doing that. I break our receptionist so I'll wipe down her desk/chair/phone before I use it.

When i get home after work after i take off my shoes ive been immediately washing my hands and then I change out of my work clothes.
You’re good about not touching your face? Do you bring lunch? How is it stored? There are nice insulated lunch bags with ice packs you can keep in your cubicle. Avoid communal areas as much as possible.

@vevster I just bought Vitamin C yesterday darn it. Looked on Amazon the other day for elderberry capsules. Nothing was in stock. Had to preorder for delivery by the end of the month.
 

discodumpling

Well-Known Member
I went out to pick up a few things at my local stop n shop and that's exactly what I got....a few things. There isnt much out there. Even the subpar fruits and veg they usually have was all gone!
Not one square of TP or PT anywhere!! Water?? I saw a few lonely 4 packs of LifeWater. I'm not tripping about water cause I can boil and cool just like my Granny taught me. Plus I have another water solution I'm gonna try out today. I'll share if I'm successful!
There was no meat...except for massive loads of corned beef brisket..cause tis the season for that sort of thing here. So we're gonna make do with what we already have in the house....my.kids have no idea what SPAM tastes like...they gone learn this week though!!
I found a can of Spam and a can of bully beef aka corned beef waaaay in the back of my cupboards and those are bout to be weeknight meals!
 

nyeredzi

Well-Known Member
I'm a little sick, or at the beginning of a cold. Right now it's just a scratchy throat. With 2 small kids, I get a cold-like thing every 2 months, so I'm about due. It's my 3rd or 4th since Fall. When I dropped the youngest off to daycare last week, I saw another kid with a runny nose, so I shouldn't be surprised. As a normal rule, I would not then lock myself in the house for 2 weeks. Don't think I'll do it now, either, but I am legit considering wearing a mask so as to not infect anyone. Legit question: why is it that they say masks can help prevent you from spreading a virus, but not help prevent you from contracting it?
 

nyeredzi

Well-Known Member
So the schools are closed for 2 weeks (at least). My husband and I both work. By chance, I was off the first 2 days for holiday anyway (university 'spring break' for employees). The 3rd day is a day my husband can watch. The 4th day was a scheduled "telework exercise" anyway, to see how teleworking would work en masse for that employer. The 5th day, I still don't know what I'm going to do. Might have to take leave that day, or maybe I will telework again. I'm generally not approved to telework at that location (i have 2 job locations), but they've relaxed telework restrictions. But I hope in reality they don't expect me to meet the deadlines, which were pressing before this all happened, while teleworking. In addition to having a 6 year old at home with me that is nowhere near self-sufficient, making telework itself less efficient for me, I also work with data at that site that is on a server that must be accessed on-site. So, I literally cannot do that work remotely. These deadlines flying out the window as we speak.

The 2nd week of school closures, I was lucky to secure childcare at the same location that picks her up and drops her off for school, which is also the same place that watches the 2 year old. Maybe I will be feeling better by then and can go into the office (i'm also coming down with a cold right now). After that, who knows? Frankly, can I even be sure the daycare I've secured will stay open? Teleworking at my university job is sustainable, though not ideal. But teleworking at my fed gov't site is not. I guess we'll see what happens!
 

intellectualuva

Well-Known Member
The person who teased me about my stocking up two weeks ago called me all upset because she is out of TP and the grocery stores didn’t even have meat left. :lol:
Yeah. My cousins giggled at me when I said I was buying stuff just in case early Febuary. Now she needs water and all there is left is nasty dasani.

My boss stocked up weeeeeks ago before US even had it's 1st confirmed case. She said yall are gonna be sorry. And a lot of us are. Waiting until the last minute to buy stuff.
She said she bought everything so early because of "people's hysteria". Not because she is afraid of running out of things to eat or staying bunker-ed in for weeks at a time. She was right. As I said earlier....they bought all the damn frozen fruit:(. Wasn't nobody interested in frozen cherries in my area and now they're all gone lol
That was me. Not only was I worried about not getting what I needed, I also was worried about being in crowded stores trying to get what I needed. My freezer is only so big so I had to really think about what I was getting.[/QUOTE]
 

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
They are now saying if you take things like aspirin, Tylenol, and Aleve you get worse. All the more reason to keep it natural.
I believe the over the counter medicines that they are saying may be problematic are NSAIDS such as Ibuprofen, Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Naproxen, Naprosyn and Aspirin. These are all a NO! And should not be taken if you suspect you have the virus.

I do not believe that Tylenol falls in that category of being an NSAIDS.

My understanding is that paracetamol, which was recommended in the article you linked from the Lancet, is the French form of Tylenol. They are recommending taking paracetamol.

Everyone, always do your own research, don't go by what I'm saying.
 
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Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
I'm a little sick, or at the beginning of a cold. Right now it's just a scratchy throat. With 2 small kids, I get a cold-like thing every 2 months, so I'm about due. It's my 3rd or 4th since Fall. When I dropped the youngest off to daycare last week, I saw another kid with a runny nose, so I shouldn't be surprised. As a normal rule, I would not then lock myself in the house for 2 weeks. Don't think I'll do it now, either, but I am legit considering wearing a mask so as to not infect anyone. Legit question: why is it that they say masks can help prevent you from spreading a virus, but not help prevent you from contracting it?
Masks may stop you from spreading the disease because when we speak, cough etc, we create spittle or stuff comes out of the mouth aerosolized, in droplets. The masks may limit or stop the escaping droplets from one's mouth.

But, the masks may not help stop you from contracting the disease because the pathogen/virus/disease can enter your body through your eyes. The eyes cannot be covered with the little mouth masks.

I would think the ears are a point of vulnerability too.
 
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brg240

Well-Known Member
You’re good about not touching your face? Do you bring lunch? How is it stored? There are nice insulated lunch bags with ice packs you can keep in your cubicle. Avoid communal areas as much as possible.
Im okayish about not touching my face. I have a note at my desk to remind me

I have a personal mini fridge. I unfortunately can't avoid them completely bc I have to set up and clean up after a large meeting and pick up the kitchen at the end of the day.
 

rayne

Well-Known Member
https://www.fox32chicago.com/news/coronavirus-puts-wedding-industry-on-edge

Coronavirus puts wedding industry on edge
Published 13 hours ago
Coronavirus
Associated Press
article




NEW YORK (AP) — Guests are jittery, travel is tangled, and soon-to-be brides and grooms are facing tough choices because of the coronavirus outbreak: postpone, cancel or forge ahead with their weddings?

Uncertainty as virus cases grow in the U.S. and elsewhere has sent ripples through the wedding industry, from photographers and caterers to harried wedding planners and venues.




“So much extra stress,” said 26-year-old bride Hayley Pass in Saddle Brook, New Jersey. “After all this planning it's like, really, we're going to postpone? We just really want it to happen but it seems like the worst is yet to come."

She and her fiance had 155 confirmed guests for their March 22 nuptials in Cedar Grove, New Jersey, with a handful of cancellations due to virus fear. One relative made it clear that she and her family will attend but would keep hugging and kissing to a minimum.

The couple will only cancel the wedding if their venue — or their closest loved ones — pull out. They would head to the courthouse instead to get hitched, putting off their party until COVID-19 subsides. Other couples expressed similar resolve to keep their wedding dates as the industry heads into the busy June season.

Rescheduling or canceling raises a world of questions. What are the odds that vendors will all be available on the same new date and time? Will couples lose money, in deposits and beyond already paid? Standard wedding insurance doesn't cover anxiety over a spreading virus that has come with restrictions on travel and large gatherings in spots around the world. Some insurance companies are fielding a barrage of queries over how policies work in such a unique situation.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover.

In the wedding world, vendors are feeling the pinch.

Professional planners who have longstanding relationships with suppliers have found themselves negotiating new minimum guest counts to help save their clients money as friends and family decline. Travel agents said they're trying to reroute honeymoon flights to avoid popular destinations in Asia and Europe that have been restricted or closed, such as Lake Como in Italy's hard-hit Lombardy region.

“We're trying to guess what is to come,” said Sasha Souza, a wedding planner in California's wine country. “Guest counts are dropping dramatically. We have a wedding for 150 people in June and we're now looking at 50 people. Guests are just like, 'I'm not coming.' Maybe they'll change their minds. People are receiving such mixed messages right now.”

Gabrielle Wheeler, 22, was supposed to get married in April in the olive groves of an Italian villa in the Tuscan town of Grosseto. She now has to settle for a wedding at the same place in a year. She tried to cancel when travel restrictions were imposed, but the venue wouldn’t refund her money.

“Honestly, I’m upset,” said Wheeler, who lives in Amsterdam. “I have to make the best of it.”

Abby Murray, a Charlotte, North Carolina, travel agent who specializes in honeymoons, said new business has come to a halt as existing clients postpone, shift destinations from hot spots like Italy to Hawaii, Costa Rica and the Caribbean, or try to navigate around connections through China.

At this time of year, she would usually be handling 20 clients. She now has two.

“People are scared to book their honeymoons right now. People don't even want to explore it. They're going to move forward with their weddings but take their honeymoons at a later date,” Murray said.

Dresses are also a problem for some.

The Green Bride shop in Littleton, Colorado, typically receives up to 60 wedding dresses shipped from China each month from February through May. In February, it received only four.

“We are on crunch time,” said Holly Marsh, one of the owners. "If the wedding is in June, and the dress is supposed to be here in February and it's not going to get here until May, what do you tell them?"

David Gaffke, who owns the shop Complete Bridal in East Dundee, Illinois, relies heavily on China for manufacturing, as do most in the wedding gown business.

“It's frustrating when it comes to having to tell a bride that we're not able to fulfill your needs,” he said. “This is the most important dress they're going to wear.”

Larger retailers, including David's Bridal with more than 300 stores, said their supply networks are holding steady.

Photographer Michael Busada in Washington, D.C., relies on weddings for about half his business. He has 36 weddings under contract this year, including one that was recently canceled after the bride was possibly exposed to the virus. Another wedding went from a large venue with 150 guests to a home ceremony with 20. A 10-hour day for Busada dropped to three hours of work.

Busada offered the couple who were forced to cancel a credit or postponement without penalty.

“Everybody's struggling. It doesn't do me any good to be the bad guy,” he said.

Leon Rbibo, president of The Pearl Source, an online jewelry company headquartered in Los Angeles, has been servicing the industry for more than 10 years.

He started seeing cancellations and requests for order delays in mid-January. It started with an uptick of about 5%, he said. Fast forward to late February, when such requests shot up to 15%. He projected March would end at closer to 17%, representing about $50,000 worth of business canceled or postponed.

“We know these requests are related to concerns around the spread of coronavirus because our customer experience teams are trained to ask for the reason for cancellation or postponement,” Rbibo said.

At RentMyWedding.com, which provides everything from lighting to linens for thousands of couples across the U.S., orders for March have decreased by 24.3% compared with March 2019, said Marie Kubin, the founder and CEO in Miami.

“The majority of our clients place orders one to three weeks prior to their wedding,” she said. "The couples that are canceling have said they plan to reschedule for the future, but they're not going to choose a new date until they see how things shake out with the coronavirus. Many other couples with weddings happening in the next month are asking us to put their orders on hold because they're not sure whether or not to go ahead with their weddings.”

Caterers are holding on with extra care.

Andrea Correale, president and founder of the Elegant Affairs catering and event firm in Manhattan, said she is doubling and tripling hand washing stations for workers, placing hand sanitizer in coat check and registration areas, and offering baskets of sanitizer on tables for guests.

She's also creating more distance between guests at tables, so a round table that usually seats 10 is now set up for eight.

Large bottles and pitchers of juices and soda have become individual bottles, bartenders are wearing gloves and Correale has replaced communal bowls of bar snacks with individual bags, “so people can still graze and feel safe about it.”
 
https://www.fox32chicago.com/news/coronavirus-puts-wedding-industry-on-edge

Coronavirus puts wedding industry on edge
Published 13 hours ago
Coronavirus
Associated Press
article




NEW YORK (AP) — Guests are jittery, travel is tangled, and soon-to-be brides and grooms are facing tough choices because of the coronavirus outbreak: postpone, cancel or forge ahead with their weddings?

Uncertainty as virus cases grow in the U.S. and elsewhere has sent ripples through the wedding industry, from photographers and caterers to harried wedding planners and venues.




“So much extra stress,” said 26-year-old bride Hayley Pass in Saddle Brook, New Jersey. “After all this planning it's like, really, we're going to postpone? We just really want it to happen but it seems like the worst is yet to come."

She and her fiance had 155 confirmed guests for their March 22 nuptials in Cedar Grove, New Jersey, with a handful of cancellations due to virus fear. One relative made it clear that she and her family will attend but would keep hugging and kissing to a minimum.

The couple will only cancel the wedding if their venue — or their closest loved ones — pull out. They would head to the courthouse instead to get hitched, putting off their party until COVID-19 subsides. Other couples expressed similar resolve to keep their wedding dates as the industry heads into the busy June season.

Rescheduling or canceling raises a world of questions. What are the odds that vendors will all be available on the same new date and time? Will couples lose money, in deposits and beyond already paid? Standard wedding insurance doesn't cover anxiety over a spreading virus that has come with restrictions on travel and large gatherings in spots around the world. Some insurance companies are fielding a barrage of queries over how policies work in such a unique situation.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover.

In the wedding world, vendors are feeling the pinch.

Professional planners who have longstanding relationships with suppliers have found themselves negotiating new minimum guest counts to help save their clients money as friends and family decline. Travel agents said they're trying to reroute honeymoon flights to avoid popular destinations in Asia and Europe that have been restricted or closed, such as Lake Como in Italy's hard-hit Lombardy region.

“We're trying to guess what is to come,” said Sasha Souza, a wedding planner in California's wine country. “Guest counts are dropping dramatically. We have a wedding for 150 people in June and we're now looking at 50 people. Guests are just like, 'I'm not coming.' Maybe they'll change their minds. People are receiving such mixed messages right now.”

Gabrielle Wheeler, 22, was supposed to get married in April in the olive groves of an Italian villa in the Tuscan town of Grosseto. She now has to settle for a wedding at the same place in a year. She tried to cancel when travel restrictions were imposed, but the venue wouldn’t refund her money.

“Honestly, I’m upset,” said Wheeler, who lives in Amsterdam. “I have to make the best of it.”

Abby Murray, a Charlotte, North Carolina, travel agent who specializes in honeymoons, said new business has come to a halt as existing clients postpone, shift destinations from hot spots like Italy to Hawaii, Costa Rica and the Caribbean, or try to navigate around connections through China.

At this time of year, she would usually be handling 20 clients. She now has two.

“People are scared to book their honeymoons right now. People don't even want to explore it. They're going to move forward with their weddings but take their honeymoons at a later date,” Murray said.

Dresses are also a problem for some.

The Green Bride shop in Littleton, Colorado, typically receives up to 60 wedding dresses shipped from China each month from February through May. In February, it received only four.

“We are on crunch time,” said Holly Marsh, one of the owners. "If the wedding is in June, and the dress is supposed to be here in February and it's not going to get here until May, what do you tell them?"

David Gaffke, who owns the shop Complete Bridal in East Dundee, Illinois, relies heavily on China for manufacturing, as do most in the wedding gown business.

“It's frustrating when it comes to having to tell a bride that we're not able to fulfill your needs,” he said. “This is the most important dress they're going to wear.”

Larger retailers, including David's Bridal with more than 300 stores, said their supply networks are holding steady.

Photographer Michael Busada in Washington, D.C., relies on weddings for about half his business. He has 36 weddings under contract this year, including one that was recently canceled after the bride was possibly exposed to the virus. Another wedding went from a large venue with 150 guests to a home ceremony with 20. A 10-hour day for Busada dropped to three hours of work.

Busada offered the couple who were forced to cancel a credit or postponement without penalty.

“Everybody's struggling. It doesn't do me any good to be the bad guy,” he said.

Leon Rbibo, president of The Pearl Source, an online jewelry company headquartered in Los Angeles, has been servicing the industry for more than 10 years.

He started seeing cancellations and requests for order delays in mid-January. It started with an uptick of about 5%, he said. Fast forward to late February, when such requests shot up to 15%. He projected March would end at closer to 17%, representing about $50,000 worth of business canceled or postponed.

“We know these requests are related to concerns around the spread of coronavirus because our customer experience teams are trained to ask for the reason for cancellation or postponement,” Rbibo said.

At RentMyWedding.com, which provides everything from lighting to linens for thousands of couples across the U.S., orders for March have decreased by 24.3% compared with March 2019, said Marie Kubin, the founder and CEO in Miami.

“The majority of our clients place orders one to three weeks prior to their wedding,” she said. "The couples that are canceling have said they plan to reschedule for the future, but they're not going to choose a new date until they see how things shake out with the coronavirus. Many other couples with weddings happening in the next month are asking us to put their orders on hold because they're not sure whether or not to go ahead with their weddings.”

Caterers are holding on with extra care.

Andrea Correale, president and founder of the Elegant Affairs catering and event firm in Manhattan, said she is doubling and tripling hand washing stations for workers, placing hand sanitizer in coat check and registration areas, and offering baskets of sanitizer on tables for guests.

She's also creating more distance between guests at tables, so a round table that usually seats 10 is now set up for eight.

Large bottles and pitchers of juices and soda have become individual bottles, bartenders are wearing gloves and Correale has replaced communal bowls of bar snacks with individual bags, “so people can still graze and feel safe about it.”
We were to attend a destination wedding in two weeks. It was cancelled two days ago.
 

sweetlaughter

Well-Known Member
I don't understand water being out. The water supply isn't in danger (neither is the food supply from what I'm reading). I have a filter on my fridge but if people aren't regular bottled water drinkers why hoard it now?
I think the water is going because people aren’t sure of how to prepare so most people are preparing for what they do know....tornados, hurricanes, earthquakes,snowstorms, etc.. Then all they do is add in cleaning supplies and voila, the store is empty.
 
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