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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

Plushottie

Thicc and fione
I was at the Social Security office last week. I had to wait outside for at least 20 minutes just to be allowed into the building. They only allowed people in 3-4 at a time. Masks are required and once you get through the metal detectors they have selected seats designated for people to sit on which are arranged to accommodate adequate space between people.

People still wear masks where I live but it's amazing how schools and restaurants etc. have relaxed mask and social distancing requirements but government buildings haven't. It's two different realities.
Schools want to go back to indoctrination and restaurants want money and get people back to distractions. It’s wild here in the Texas
 

Evolving78

Well-Known Member
No, that’s not the schools that’s the elected school board members pushing their political agenda. I just moved districts to a red county and it’s wild how these folks dictate school policy.
I agree. Public schools and school boards are extremely problematic and those political agendas that are being pushed has nothing to do with what really needs to be addressed. I am a stronger supporter of school choice. Schools that have predominantly black children have done them a great disservice, especially during the lockdown, and now thinking they can go back to business as usual is asinine.
 
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Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member

COVID has evolved to make you sicker quicker, new study finds

The initial “wild type” strain of COVID detected in Wuhan, China, in late 2019 had an incubation period of around 5.2 days. COVID’s Alpha variant—which burst onto the scene in the U.K. in December 2020—took about five days for symptoms to develop after exposure, according to the study.

By the time the Beta variant was discovered a short time later, the incubation period had shortened to 4.5 days. The Delta variant saw an incubation period of 4.41 days, and Omicron’s incubation period is currently 3.42 days.

Among all versions of COVID, the mean incubation period is 6.57 days, the authors found—longer than that of other coronaviruses that cause the common cold (3.2 days); common respiratory illness parainfluenza (2.6 days); the most common type of flu, influenza A (about 1.5 days); and rhinovirus, another common source of colds (1.4 days). The mean incubation period was longer for individuals ages 60 and older and 18 and younger, and for those whose illness was mild, the authors found.

Studies have shown that shorter incubation periods “are associated with more serious disease,” as was the case with fellow coronaviruses SARS and MERS, according to the study’s authors. But they did not draw any further conclusions about differences in incubation time in relation to the severity of COVID variants in comparison to each other.

On the bright side, an overall decrease in incubation period means less time for infected individuals to unknowingly transmit the virus.

Until earlier this month, when the CDC dropped much of its precautionary COVID guidance, the federal health agency recommended that those exposed to COVID quarantine for at least five days, and the World Health Organization still recommends quarantining for 14 days.

The study’s authors pointed to their own research as a reason that different countries may want to rethink their isolation time recommendations.

“Some countries around the world require close contacts to be isolated for 14 days,” they wrote. “However, with the shortening of the incubation period of new variants, the isolation period can be adjusted appropriately to reduce the pressure on the health system.”
 

Lylddlebit

Well-Known Member
Good Article @Black Ambrosia
The crazy thing is I don't know a single person severely sick with Covid for the first time during the pandemic and it has been like that since March or April. I am not implying that people are not still getting severely ill and dying but since BA 5 hit, everyone I know who has gotten Covid has avoided severe illness whether vaccinated or not. DH and I were talking about how we can plan to reintegrate into society on Monday . We are still factoring BA5 trends and vaccinated versus unvaccinated data. When it comes the the vaccine he leans more towards J&J and I like Novavvax better of the vaccine options. I have found better data that is aggregating information based on vaccine markers. It isn't the full shebang but it is much better than I was finding previously.


Here is some of the information I look at for an idea. I want at least this for all states of course.... "If I ruled the world"
 
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ScorpioBeauty09

Well-Known Member
DH found out a friend of his mom's died of COVID-19 this week after catching it at a funeral where she was the only person wearing a mask. She and her family weren't vaccinated because it was against their religion and they distrust the medical system.

And one of DH's co-workers left work early yesterday because she wasn't feeling well and tests positive for COVID-19. Thank goodness DH always wears a mask and wasn't around her long.
 

BrownBetty

Well-Known Member
I went to help out an older family member last week. I get there and they are coughing. I asked if they took a covid test. They respond no, they were fine. I stayed outside then put on my n95 for the 3 minutes I was in their house.

They tested positive the next day. They are the 4th person I know with covid in the last week.

Yall be safe out there.
 

Black Ambrosia

Well-Known Member
My coworkers stay getting Covid. One that I work closely with is on round 2. I’m so glad I’m working remote.

I had to go into the office today because a storm knocked out our power 2 days ago. Ordinarily this would be a problem for me but I only saw 3 people the whole time I was there and I don’t work with any of them.
 

ScorpioBeauty09

Well-Known Member
My coworkers stay getting Covid. One that I work closely with is on round 2. I’m so glad I’m working remote.

I had to go into the office today because a storm knocked out our power 2 days ago. Ordinarily this would be a problem for me but I only saw 3 people the whole time I was there and I don’t work with any of them.
Me too. I'm so glad I work from home. I forever side eye DH's work because they can do their job from home yet they have to come in 3-4 days a week and many of his co-workers have tested positive.
 

Everything Zen

Well-Known Member
DH is exposed once again to COVID bc his boss is out with it so we’re all on high alert. I need to deliver a critical glaucoma drop to my dad this weekend but I was hoping to spend time with my parents for at least a day- now everything is up in the air. I said I don’t care if my trip overseas for work and a much needed vacation tacked on the back end is canceled due to COVID. I’ve sacrificed my mental health staying cooped up to keep my parents safe… So here we are again. I plan to get the new vaccine as soon as I can- keep going on as best I know how and hope for the best. :sad:
 

Lylddlebit

Well-Known Member
I just found out a close family member has had covid 3x. I was in utter shock. They said they don't wear masks anymore because they caught covid the last time while masking, I asked about the type of mask they wore... "it wasn't a n95". I just said oh.

I didn't bother to discuss long covid concerns. It is weird how people have just decided to roll the dice.
What I have interest in is if multiple infections increase incidence of adverse effects. Catching some viruses once will give you the same outcome as exposure to the same strain multiple times times but if a person catches a more virulent strain they could have had he disease for years and the new strain could feel like brand new disease/condition. Covid studies quote reinfection with similar effects, worse effects or milder effects but there is still a lot unknown. What many are calling reinfections today may very well be identified as the virus going dormant in the body then reactivating like recurring outbreaks for some people in a few years. When someone has to change their HIV cocktail it is very rarely the result of getting reinfected with HIV. We shall see and time will tell it. When it comes to this thing I wouldn't be sure sure if it never left or if it is actually reinfections. I certainly don't believe that rebound Paxlovid explanation AT ALL. I think they got infected, the medicine tapered their symptoms it a bit and when the treatment was over their body handled the original infection like bodies do infections.
 
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dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
What I have interest in is if multiple infections increase incidence of adverse effects. Catching some viruses once will give you the same outcome as exposure to the same strain multiple times times but if a person catches a more virulent strain they could have had he disease for years and the new strain could feel like brand new disease/condition. Covid studies quote reinfection with similar effects, worse effects or milder effects but there is still a lot unknown. What many are calling reinfections today may very well be identified as the virus going dormant in the body then reactivating like recurring outbreaks for some people in a few years. When someone has to change their HIV cocktail it is very rarely the result of getting reinfected with HIV. We shall see and time will tell it. When it comes to this thing I wouldn't be sure sure if i it never left or if it is actually reinfections. I certainly don't believe that rebound Paxlovid explanation AT ALL. I think they got infected, the medicine tapered their symptoms it a bit and when the treatment was over their body handled the original infection.

What was the Paxlovid explanation?


A lady's 14 year old child is taking Paxlovid. She knew nothing about possible rebound until I told her about it. The rebound symptoms are normally worse.
 

Lylddlebit

Well-Known Member
What was the Paxlovid explanation?


A lady's 14 year old child is taking Paxlovid. She knew nothing about possible rebound until I told her about it. The rebound symptoms are normally worse.
Just the narrative that someone caught Covid then got healed by Paxlovid followed by being REINFECTED a few weeks later. It makes more sense that the original infection(the majority of the time this narrative is quoted) ran it's full course over those few weeks than back to back new infections or reinfection occurred.
 

Everything Zen

Well-Known Member
I just got my Moderna bivalent booster today. I’m looking forward to slightly reintegrating into life with a new normal with masks, avoiding crowds, etc. bc I believe I have some level of agoraphobia and mental health determination from this and need to ease back in on top of severe burnout and this wi take a couple of years to resolve.
 

yamilee21

Well-Known Member
… I certainly don't believe that rebound Paxlovid explanation AT ALL. I think they got infected, the medicine tapered their symptoms it a bit and when the treatment was over their body handled the original infection like bodies do infections.
:confused: But that’s exactly what the rebound explanation is, Paxlovid suppressed the symptoms temporarily, and when the medication was finished, the symptoms came back. “Rebound” Covid was never thought to be a new Covid infection, just the same one. It most likely has happened when Paxlovid was given too early - after a positive PCR test, but *before* symptoms began. Paxlovid given *after* a positive antigen test/when someone already has obvious symptoms, doesn’t seem to cause the rebound effect, because the body had already begun fighting the illness.

That rebound effect is different from reinfection; but the 4-6 week later reinfections are also happening, regardless of Paxlovid/Evusheld. Those are most obvious when there is testing for specific variants. For example, in New York City, the overwhelming majority of cases in mid-May were the Omicron BA2.12.1 sub-variant . By the beginning of July, the overwhelming majority of cases were the Omicron BA5 sub-variant. A person who had Covid in NYC in mid-May, recovered completely, and then got sick again six weeks later, almost certainly had two different variants, and not a rebound of the previous variant. On the other hand, a person who never fully recovered, could indeed be dealing with the previous infection.
 

Lylddlebit

Well-Known Member
Fair enough. I could have been clearer my post. Ultimately I do believe there is lingering damage from the initial infection for some, some infections that last lengthy amounts of time without actually clearing(yet being judged as cleared based on symptoms not necessarily blood work), and actual reinfection of different strains occur which each scenario possessing different dynamics. "Almost certainly" isn't really a phase I would use with this virus though. Between different strains, mutations and the dynamic between virus and individual body chemistry it is still being revealed. Not knocking you, just not trusting the narratives either.
 

Seattle Slew

WinterinAtl
@Seattle Slew
Please take care of yourself as best as you can. I know this sounds crazy, but stay on top of showering and drink hot drinks.
Thank you - I gave been drinking lots of tea. My fever keeps coming back which worries me. But I heard some people fight the fever for a week. I think the steam from shower will be nice, but I’m dizzy when the fever is up.
 
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