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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

MamaBear2012

Well-Known Member
My son's former teacher had Covid basically back to back (or within 90 days I should say). I do feel so bad for teachers. It's a job where you are constantly with other adults and hundreds of kids. Even masked and vaccinated, you're with tons of people all the time.

Anyway, she had Covid in May and missed her child's high school graduation, so she missed the end of last school year. Then she tested positive for Covid at the beginning of August, so she missed the beginning of this school year. And the sad thing is this is the third time that she's had Covid. She said that her sense of smell is off since the second time she got it. And now she randomly smells cigarette smoke or something burning. She said she could explain it away during the summer, but when she got back into the classroom and started smelling it she knows these elementary kids aren't lighting up in her classroom. I hope over time some of these long hauler symptoms that people are experiencing start to disappear.
 

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member
About a week ago the grocery stores in our area also took down the barriers between the cashiers and customers.

I guess everyone is saying covid is over.

I just ordered more kn95 masks in different colors cuz Ds likes to match them with his shirts.

It doesn't look like a new strain is active and b.5 is going down so I wonder if we will have another wave.

The grocery stores put the covid barriers back up a few days ago.
It looks like we are about to see a spike.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
We had a huge outbreak - 10 employees went to the same event. I keep telling them they can be tired of Covid but Covid ain't tired of them. Oh well, they lucked out that the Governor extended Covid sick pay cuz that poo originally expired just in time for them to catch the Covids. I got a text yesterday somebody came back from their vacation testing positive.

Oh yeah, they all think they got it at the same place but check this out, the unvaxxed ones got them Season 1 Covid symptoms - no smell and taste, crazy head and body aches, fever, confusion. Everybody else got sniffles and a sore throat. I'm sure that's all coincidence.
 

dancinstallion

Well-Known Member

France's 8th Wave of COVID Is Gaining in Intensity:


France has entered an eighth wave of the COVID-19 virus, as the winter season approaches, said a leading French health officialYes, we are in this eighth wave," said Brigitte Autran, who is a member of the government's vaccination strategic board.

"All the indicators are on the up," added Autran.
France's COVID figures published on Monday showed that the seven day moving average of daily new cases had reached, with the latest reported figure of 45,631, its highest level since August 2.

France's COVID overall hospitalisation figures, at 15,166, and the numbers of COVID patients in hospital intensive care units (ICU) - at 843 - were also at their highest level since the end of August.

@Chicoro are you seeing or hearing about an increase in cases?
 

Chicoro

5 Year Shea Anniversary: Started Dec 16th, 2016!

France's 8th Wave of COVID Is Gaining in Intensity:


France has entered an eighth wave of the COVID-19 virus, as the winter season approaches, said a leading French health officialYes, we are in this eighth wave," said Brigitte Autran, who is a member of the government's vaccination strategic board.

"All the indicators are on the up," added Autran.
France's COVID figures published on Monday showed that the seven day moving average of daily new cases had reached, with the latest reported figure of 45,631, its highest level since August 2.

France's COVID overall hospitalisation figures, at 15,166, and the numbers of COVID patients in hospital intensive care units (ICU) - at 843 - were also at their highest level since the end of August.

@Chicoro are you seeing or hearing about an increase in cases?
Hi @dancinstallion,

Thanks for the info. No, I've not seen or heard about increases in cases at this time.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I'll also say that Long Haulers is a HEAUX.

I'm seeing people who lost 30-60-100 lbs over the last 1-2 years because food still is disgusting to them after having COVID-19. Some of them now (especially the older folk) have new issues going on like cancer, kidney issues, heart issues and they cannot benefit from nutrition (which would help) bc they still cannot eat. Many also have long term memory issues and Alzheimer's, dementia has been ruled out. Many have long term mobility issues and many have lung issues they cannot shake. Its really sad. Year 2-3 since COVID and we will still see the effects. Mark my words.
 

awhyley

Well-Known Member
Yahoo is stating that Covid will be 'weirder' this go around.

Yahoo News

The next U.S. COVID wave is coming. Why it will be 'much weirder than before.'​

Andrew Romano
Andrew Romano

·West Coast Correspondent
Thu, October 13, 2022 at 4:00 PM

Unless you’re a real-life virologist — or unless you enjoy playing one on Twitter — it has become pretty much impossible to keep up with all of the latest coronavirus variants.

First they were named after Greek letters, like Omicron. Easy enough. Then came a few short, Star Wars-esque alphanumerics, like BA.5. Fine.

But in recent weeks, COVID trackers have suddenly been subjected to a dizzying barrage of BA.4.6s and BF.7s and BA.2.75.2s and BQ.1.1s. There’s even an ominous new sublineage called XBB.

For most Americans — the bulk of whom appear to be “over” COVID anyway — that’s far too many numbers and letters to grasp. Easier to just tune it all out, they say. Call me when there’s another wave on the way.

Well, now there might be.

The last big variant of concern — the hypertransmissible Omicron offshoot known as BA.5 — peaked in July. Since then, reported U.S. cases have plummeted by 70%. While far too many Americans are still dying of COVID each day — nearly 400, on average — the rate has returned to pre-BA.5 lows. It’s a moment of relative calm.

But under the surface, something new — and potentially dangerous for the most vulnerable among us — has been happening: Omicron has started to “splinter.”

As a result, we may be entering the next phase of the pandemic. Thanks to layers of immunity from vaccination and prior infection — plus lifesaving treatments such as Paxlovid — we will almost certainly never regress to the horrific era of collapsing ICUs and thousands of deaths per day.

Yet the orderly succession of individually dominant variants we’ve come to expect over the last two years — think Alpha, then Beta, then Delta, then Omicron — may also be a thing of the past.

Instead, what scientists are seeing now is a bunch of worrisome Omicron descendants arising simultaneously but independently in different corners of the globe — all with the same set of advantageous mutations that help them dodge our existing immune defenses and drive new waves of infection.

Experts call this “convergent evolution” — and right now, there’s a “fairly unprecedented amount” of it going on, according to Tom Peacock, a virologist at Imperial College London.

“Although stuff started off in different places — some BA.2, some BA.5 — everything’s going back in the same direction,” Peacock recently told Stat. “They’re getting the same mutations, which implies there’s a very strong selective pressure in the environment right now, which of course is people’s immunity.”

“Clearly,” he added in an interview with Nature, “there’s an optimal way for a variant to look going into this season.”

The problem is that what’s optimal for the coronavirus usually isn’t optimal for us.

Of all 300 post-BA.5 sublineages currently being monitored by the World Health Organization — a group that includes BA.4.6, BF.7 and BA.2.75, which have risen as a proportion of U.S. cases in recent weeksexperts are most concerned about two Omicron spinoffs that have barely even registered in America yet: BQ.1.1 and XBB.

“XBB and BQ.1.1 are 2 of the most important variants [to] watch right now,” Eric Topol, founder of Scripps Translational Institute, tweeted last week.

Why? Because they’re “escape” variants. While earlier sublineages that were jockeying for post-BA.5 supremacy in the U.S. had a few advantageous mutations, XBB, B.Q.1.1 and their ilk — including BN.1 and BA.2.75.2 — now boast at least six changes in just the right places on the virus’s spike protein (leading some researchers to refer to them as the “pentagon” or “hexagon” variants). As a consequence, they now rank as the "most antibody-evasive” strains ever tested, according to Yunlong Richard Cao, an immunologist at Peking University in Beijing.

This is troubling for two reasons. The first is that the most vulnerable among us — the immunocompromised and the elderly — tend not to produce as strong or as lasting an antibody response after infection or vaccination. Monoclonal antibody treatments have helped fill the gap and shield them from severe illness.

But many of these treatments were abandoned after prior variants rendered them useless — and now lab experiments have shown that the remaining antibody therapies (bebtelovimab and Evusheld) don’t work against XBB and B.Q.1.1. (Last week, the Food and Drug Administration warned that Evusheld can’t neutralize the latest variants, meaning immunocompromised people may no longer be able to take it for pre-exposure protection.) Once the new escape variants take off, people at high risk for severe COVID are likely to be even more vulnerable than before (though not completely vulnerable as vaccination and prior infection still offer some defense against serious illness).

The article is kind of long. See more at the link below.

Link: https://www.yahoo.com/news/the-next...ll-be-much-weirder-than-before-200044795.html
 

PatDM'T

Well-Known Member

Opinion: Doctors didn’t believe that I had Covid-19. I found a way to make them listen​

Opinion by Chimére L. Smith
Published 6:14 AM EDT, Mon October 17, 2022


This video of
her telling her
story is long
but I enjoyed
listening to her
and find her
so admirable.

 
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