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The Covid-19 Thread: News, Preparation Tips, Etc

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
For our LHCF Sisters in England, I saw this from the NHS. I thought it was comprehensive. It is specific to high risk groups as it relates to the heart. Perhaps someone you know could benefit from this information.

@GGsKin
@Guapa1

https://www.bhf.org.uk/informationsupport/heart-matters-magazine/news/coronavirus-and-your-health

Coronavirus: what it means for you if you have heart or circulatory disease

Updated Saturday 21 March 2020

Our medical experts explain what we know so far about the Covid-19 coronavirus and how it can affect people with heart disease.

I have a heart or circulatory condition – am I at increased risk of coronavirus?
We know that this is a frightening time for lots of people, especially if you have an existing health problem. Most people with coronavirus (Covid-19) have mild symptoms and make a full recovery. Having a heart and circulatory condition probably doesn’t make you any more likely to catch coronavirus than anyone else. But if you have a heart condition it may mean that you could get more ill if you catch it, which is why it’s really important to protect yourself.

Anyone with a heart condition is considered high risk of more severe complications of Covid 19 coronavirus.

Some groups may have a higher risk than others so it’s important you keep up to date with the government’s advice, available on their website.

The government has recently updated their advice for people at extremely high risk of severe illness from Covid-19 because of an underlying health condition, and for their family, friends and carers. It involves more strict protective measures, called shielding.

Some heart patients are considered at extremely high risk. This applies to you if:

  • you are pregnant and have significant heart disease, congenital or acquired
  • you have had a transplant at any time, including a heart transplant.
Shielding is a measure to protect extremely vulnerable people by minimising interaction between those who are extremely vulnerable and other people. The government has advised that if you are considered extremely vulnerable, you should not leave your home, and within your home, minimise all non-essential contact with the people you live with.

If you are in one of these groups, you will be contacted directly by the NHS in England with further advice. The government is advising that you stay at home at all times and avoid any face-to-face contact for a period of at least 12 weeks from the day you receive your letter from the NHS. Please note that this period of time could change. If you think you fall into one of these categories but have not received a letter by Sunday 29 March 2020 or been contacted by your GP, you should discuss your concerns with your GP or hospital clinician.

The government’s website provides detailed information on how to practice shielding in your home and how to stay safe if you live with others. It's really important that you read the government’s advice in full, available on their website, here.

For many of us, staying at home and minimising contact with friends and family will be very difficult. It's important that even though you need to be physically apart, you stay connected with friends and family over the phone or on social media. There are resources available to help you look after your wellbeing, including the Every Mind Matters website.

Covid-19 coronavirus is a new disease and we don’t know everything about who is most at risk of complications. Other heart patients may still be at particularly high risk or high risk. If you are in either of these groups, you should be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures. This list is based on the best information available from relevant experts. It's possible that other conditions could put you at risk that we don't know about yet, so it's important that everyone works hard not to catch or spread coronavirus.

Some heart patients are considered particularly high risk. This applies to you if:

  • You have heart disease and you're over 70
  • You have heart disease and lung disease or chronic kidney disease
  • You have angina that restricts your daily life or means you have to use your GTN frequently
  • Heart failure, especially if it restricts your daily life or you’ve been admitted to hospital to treat your heart failure in the past year
  • Heart valve disease that is severe and associated with symptoms (such as if you regularly feel breathless, or you have symptoms from your heart valve problem despite medication, or if you are waiting for valve surgery)
  • You’re recovering from recent open-heart surgery in the last three months (including heart bypass surgery)
  • Congenital heart disease (any type) if you also have any of the following: lung disease, pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, you’re over 70, you are pregnant, or if you have complex congenital heart disease.
If any of these apply to you, this means you are at high risk:

If you have atrial fibrillation, there isn’t enough information at the moment to tell whether it or other abnormal heart rhythm problems put you at higher risk from coronavirus. It seems likely if you have well controlled atrial fibrillation, that your risk is lower than for the groups mentioned above.

You can see the full list of affected conditions on the government website.
 

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
We all know that improving our diets can have a positive impact on health. Those types of changes type time. As you are moving toward improving your food, you may find that you have phlegm in your body. That may need to be addressed immediately. Ideally, you want to begin to immediately optimize the functions of your body. One way to do this is to thin the phlegm that may currently be in your body.

 

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
Global Health Security Office, which was on the National Security Council

Outlook
Perspective

I ran the White House pandemic office. Trump closed it.
The federal government is moving too slowly, due to a lack of leadership.


President Trump in the Oval Office on Thursday. His White House eliminated a National Security Council office that focused on pandemics. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)


By
Beth Cameron
Beth Cameron is vice president for global biological policy and programs at the Nuclear Threat Initiative. She previously served as the senior director for global health security and biodefense on the White House National Security Council.
March 13, 2020 at 2:32 p.m. GMT+1
When President Trump took office in 2017, the White House’s National Security Council Directorate for Global Health Security and Biodefense survived the transition intact. Its mission was the same as when I was asked to lead the office, established after the Ebola epidemic of 2014: to do everything possible within the vast powers and resources of the U.S. government to prepare for the next disease outbreak and prevent it from becoming an epidemic or pandemic.


One year later, I was mystified when the White House dissolved the office, leaving the country less prepared for pandemics like covid-19.

The U.S. government’s slow and inadequate response to the new coronavirus underscores the need for organized, accountable leadership to prepare for and respond to pandemic threats.

In a health security crisis, speed is essential. When this new coronavirus emerged, there was no clear White House-led structure to oversee our response, and we lost valuable time. Yes, we have capable and committed global and national disease-prevention and management organizations, as well as state and local health departments, all working overtime now. But even in prepared cities like Seattle, health systems are struggling to test patients and keep pace with growing caseloads. The specter of rapid community transmission and exponential growth is real and daunting. The job of a White House pandemics office would have been to get ahead: to accelerate the response, empower experts, anticipate failures, and act quickly and transparently to solve problems.

It’s impossible to assess the full impact of the 2018 decision to disband the White House office responsible for this work. Biological experts do remain in the White House and in our government. But it is clear that eliminating the office has contributed to the federal government’s sluggish domestic response. What’s especially concerning about the absence of this office today is that it was originally set up because a previous epidemic made the need for it quite clear.

Coronavirus will linger after the pandemic ends. But it won’t be as bad.

The U.S. government worked hard to fight the 2014 Ebola epidemic. Unlike Central Africa, Ebola was not a usual occurrence in West Africa; the necessary elements of community trust and public health decision-making weren’t in place to detect and stop it. Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone were blind spots for disease surveillance. The cost was thousands of lives, billions of dollars and years of economic recovery for countries already torn by decades of war.

So in 2016, after the formidable U.S.-led Ebola response, the Obama White House established the global health security office at the National Security Council and asked me to lead the team. We were to prepare for and, if possible, prevent the next outbreak from becoming an epidemic or pandemic.


Our team reported to a senior-level response coordinator on the National Security Council staff who could rally the government at the highest levels, as well as to the national security adviser and the homeland security adviser. This high-level domestic and global reporting structure wasn’t an accident. It was a recognition that epidemics know no borders and that a serious, fast response is crucial. Our job was to be the smoke alarm — keeping watch to get ahead of emergencies, sounding a warning at the earliest sign of fire — all with the goal of avoiding a six-alarm blaze.


We partnered with federal departments and agencies as they monitored evolving outbreaks, triggering alarms for decision-makers when those outbreaks began to take on unusual or worrisome characteristics. Shortly before Trump took office, we were watching many health security threats, including a rising number of cases in China of H7N9 influenza, a deadly strain with high mortality but low transmissibility between people. Earlier, we had been tracking a large outbreak of yellow fever in Angola that threatened to sap the limited global supply of that vaccine, affecting the local population, international travelers, deployed citizens and troops. We were focused on naturally occurring diseases and potential bioterrorism — any and every biological threat that could cause a major global health and security emergency.

My office was also tasked with preparing — at home and around the world — for the next health emergency, no matter its origin. In 2014, even before the first cases of Ebola came to light in Guinea, the Obama administration launched the Global Health Security Agenda, which now includes more than 60 countries, to accelerate epidemic preparedness. That effort, bolstered by $1 billion from the U.S. government in an emergency spending bill to fight Ebola, led to major gains in global capability to combat the Ebola outbreak and prepare for the next pandemic, which turned out to be covid-19. We began building, measuring and tracking capacities each country had, such as the strength of their national laboratory systems and their abilities to detect and report disease, stand up emergency operation centers, build an epidemiology workforce, and maintain safe and secure practices. We spurred the use of transparent, measurable assessments of progress, and we leveraged our diplomacy with other countries to finance and fill gaps. At the same time, we strengthened international biosurveillance networks to help alert us to future potential pandemics.


We can’t stop the pandemic now. But we can be ready for it.

Another critical task came in early 2017, when we began transitioning pandemic preparedness to the incoming Trump administration. As a civil servant and the head of the directorate, I remained at the White House for several months after the transition. I attended senior-level meetings and directly briefed the homeland security adviser and the national security adviser. After I left the White House that March, pandemic preparedness remained on the agenda; my office remained intact under the leadership of my well-respected successor, Rear Adm. Tim Ziemer; and the national security adviser was tracking H7N9 and other emerging threats.

It’s unclear whether the decision to disband the directorate, which was made in May 2018, after John Bolton became national security adviser, was a tactical move to downgrade the issue or whether it was part of the White House’s interest in simplifying and shrinking the National Security Council staff. Either way, it left an unclear structure and strategy for coordinating pandemic preparedness and response. Experts outside government and on Capitol Hill called for the office’s reinstatement at the time.

Its absence now is all too evident. In his remarks Wednesday night, the president talked about travel bans and the resilience of the U.S. economy but made little specific mention of the public health crisis unfolding across America — exactly the kind of detail a dedicated NSC pandemics infrastructure would have pushed to address. A directorate within the White House would have been responsible for coordinating the efforts of multiple federal agencies to make sure the government was backstopping testing capacity, devising approaches to manufacture and avoid shortages of personal protective equipment, strengthening U.S. lab capacity to process covid-19 tests, and expanding the health-care workforce.


The office would galvanize resources to coordinate a robust and seamless domestic and global response. It would identify needs among state and local officials, and advise and facilitate regular, focused communication from federal health and scientific experts to provide states and the public with fact-based tools to minimize the virus’s spread. The White House is uniquely positioned to take into account broader U.S. and global security considerations associated with health emergencies, including their impact on deployed citizens, troops and regional economies, as well as peace and stability. A White House office would have been able to elevate urgent issues fast, so they didn’t linger or devolve to inaction, as with coronavirus testing in the United States. It would be in charge of sharing information and coordinating our public health and humanitarian response with partners and allies. And it would work now to prepare the United States and the world for the next pandemic, including by developing incentives for global leaders and governments to rapidly finance and fill identified gaps.

Pandemics, like weapons of mass destruction and climate change, are transnational threats with potentially existential consequences. No single department or agency can be responsible for handling them. Pandemic threats may not arise every year, but the White House should constantly prepare for them. We can’t afford for federal decision-makers to waste time relearning old lessons when they should be innovating and acting.


Covid-19 wasn’t preventable, but it was predictable. Hopefully, its impact can still be limited. But it is well past time for the U.S. government to show the leadership required for an effective domestic and global response. We need to start sprinting. Come April and May, no one will wish the United States had done less.






 
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Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!



Christopher Burgess

Follow
Feb 15, 2018 · 10 min read

The Emperor’s New Clothes: Trump, The Media and the Problems of Pluralistic Ignorance

We all know the story of “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” Hans Christian Andersen’s very short narrative is a classic, and it should be. It presents us with an important lesson about human nature, and it’s a lesson that’s clearly not just meant for children. The problem is that it’s just a fairy tale. Many such tales try to appeal to our higher moral sense, what Lincoln called the “better angels of our nature.” In most fairy tales, things work out pretty much to the advantage of the good, the brave, the loyal, etc. In Andersen’s story, things are supposed to work out well for the truth-telling boy, and by extension, all the people of the realm.


[...] There is also the fact that being shown to have held a false belief tends to upset people. They hate to be embarrassed, and they will resist admitting it. Many cherish their beliefs too much to part with them willingly. A remedy that seems always to lead just as quickly to massive emotional upheaval and potential violence as it is to produce a just realignment is hardly a desirable remedy. Some people just can’t face reality after being swindled and humiliated. Some people are incapable of admitting they’ve ever made the wrong choice or trusted the wrong person. [...]


The Real Story Behind the Story

For social psychologists, the story is a textbook example of pluralistic ignorance, a social phenomenon in which “no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes” (Krech and Crutchfield, 1948). Where pluralistic ignorance occurs, great mischief often follows. Jens Ulrik Hansen elaborates: “pluralistic ignorance is the phenomenon where a group of people shares a false belief about the beliefs, norms, actions or thoughts of the other group members.” This sort of thing happens all the time, and most people follow at least some rules and norms not because they believe in and approve of them, but because everyone else seems to. [...]

In fact, deliberately using pluralistic ignorance to quell dissent among the rabble and baffle one’s factional political opponents is probably best called some kind of en masse gaslighting. That makes it perfect for Donald Trump, since he’s obviously the gaslighter-in-chief. We’d like to believe that if everybody’s not fooled, then nobody’s really fooled, but pluralistic ignorance as a social phenomenon shows us that we can all act like we’ve been fooled even when we haven’t, as long as we are able to believe that everyone else in our group is on board and everybody who’s not one of us just doesn’t get it. Talk about a robust phenomenon. [...]

full article here:
https://extranewsfeed.com/the-emper...roblems-of-pluralistic-ignorance-afb276f0bc1e
 

Bette Davis Eyes

Melanated Queen
Havent been in this thread too much.

I had to come give you an update on the stupidity of those that live in my county. The young folks from the projects in Newark had parties that went viral saying "f7yk" corona and the city. Welp, they put three housing projects on mandatory quarantine as a result. They also locked down three zones in Newark as a result and stated if you're not essential dont go anywhere but food or medicine. National Guard on the scene.

Everyone in my house has been on lockdown but the nanny and myself. Shes not moving a toe since last week. I have to come into work but they are putting in measures tomorrow where we have to have our temperature checked before entering. If its over 100.4 we cant enter.

They also gave us 4 extra sick days if needed and if quarantined you will get 10 paid days excluding whatever else you already have ( vacation ,etc)
 

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
Havent been in this thread too much.

I had to come give you an update on the stupidity of those that live in my county. The young folks from the projects in Newark had parties that went viral saying "f7yk" corona and the city. Welp, they put three housing projects on mandatory quarantine as a result. They also locked down three zones in Newark as a result and stated if you're not essential dont go anywhere but food or medicine. National Guard on the scene.

Everyone in my house has been on lockdown but the nanny and myself. Shes not moving a toe since last week. I have to come into work but they are putting in measures tomorrow where we have to have our temperature checked before entering. If its over 100.4 we cant enter.

They also gave us 4 extra sick days if needed and if quarantined you will get 10 paid days excluding whatever else you already have ( vacation ,etc)
I'm sorry to hear about other people's actions impacting your life. That's a shame. But, it is good to see you're physical safety at work is being protected and they are financially compensating you with money and PTO.
 

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
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meka72

Well-Known Member
Lost Sense of Smell May Be Peculiar Clue to Coronavirus Infection
Doctor groups are recommending testing and isolation for people who lose their ability to smell and taste, even if they have no other symptoms.





A girl removed her mask to smell the flowers on a blooming tree in Skopje, North Macedonia, on Friday. Evidence is growing that lost sense of smell and taste are peculiar telltale signs of Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.Credit...Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters

By Roni Caryn Rabin

  • March 22, 2020

A mother who was infected with the coronavirus couldn’t smell her baby’s full diaper. Cooks who can usually name every spice in a restaurant dish can’t smell curry or garlic, and food tastes bland. Others say they can’t pick up the sweet scent of shampoo or the foul odor of kitty litter.

Anosmia, the loss of sense of smell, and ageusia, an accompanying diminished sense of taste, have emerged as peculiar telltale signs of Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, and possible markers of infection.

On Friday, British ear, nose and throat doctors, citing reports from colleagues around the world, called on adults who lose their senses of smell to isolate themselves for seven days, even if they have no other symptoms, to slow the disease’s spread. The published data is limited, but doctors are concerned enough to raise warnings.

“We really want to raise awareness that this is a sign of infection and that anyone who develops loss of sense of smell should self-isolate,” Prof. Claire Hopkins, president of the British Rhinological Society, wrote in an email. “It could contribute to slowing transmission and save lives.”


She and Nirmal Kumar, president of ENT UK, a group representing ear, nose and throat doctors in Britain, issued a joint statement urging health care workers to use personal protective equipment when treating any patients who have lost their senses of smell, and advised against performing nonessential sinus endoscopy procedures on anyone, because the virus replicates in the nose and the throat and an exam can prompt coughs or sneezes that expose the doctor to a high level of virus.

Two ear, nose and throat specialists in Britain who have been infected with the coronavirus are in critical condition, Dr. Hopkins said. Earlier reports from Wuhan, China, where the coronavirus first emerged, had warned that ear, nose and throat specialists as well as eye doctors were infected and dying in large numbers, Dr. Hopkins said.


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The British physicians cited reports from other countries indicating that significant numbers of coronavirus patients experienced anosmia, saying that in South Korea, where testing has been widespread, 30 percent of 2,000 patients who tested positive experienced anosmia as their major presenting symptom (these were mild cases).

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The American Academy of Otolaryngology on Sunday posted information on its website saying that mounting anecdotal evidence indicates that lost or reduced sense of smell and loss of taste are significant symptoms associated with Covid-19, and that they have been seen in patients who ultimately tested positive with no other symptoms.

The symptoms, in the absence of allergies or sinusitis, should alert doctors to screen patients for the virus and “warrant serious consideration for self isolation and testing of these individuals,” the academy said. The organization has reminded its members that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged all clinicians to prioritize urgent and emergency visits for the next several weeks and to reschedule elective and routine procedures.

“There is evolving evidence that otolaryngologists are among the highest risk group when performing upper airway surgeries and examinations,” said a notice posted on the academy’s website on Friday. “A high rate of transmission of Covid-19 to otolaryngologists has been reported from China, Italy and Iran, many resulting in death.”

‘Zoombombing’: When Video Conferences Go Wrong
March 20, 2020

Dr. Rachel Kaye, an assistant professor of otolaryngology at Rutgers, said colleagues in New Rochelle, N.Y., which has been the center of an outbreak, first alerted her to the smell loss associated with the coronavirus, sharing that patients who had first complained of anosmia later tested positive for the coronavirus. “This raised a lot of alarms for me personally,” Dr. Kaye said, because those patients “won’t know to self quarantine.”

“Most ENTs have on their own accord tried to scale down,” she said, adding that her department at Rutgers had already started using personal protective equipment and stopped performing nonessential exams.




Image

Credit...
In the areas of Italy most heavily affected by the virus, doctors say they have concluded that loss of taste and smell is an indication that a person who otherwise seems healthy is in fact carrying the virus and may be spreading it to others.

“Almost everybody who is hospitalized has this same story,” said Dr. Marco Metra, chief of the cardiology department at the main hospital in Brescia, where 700 of 1,200 inpatients have the coronavirus. “You ask about the patient’s wife or husband. And the patient says, ‘My wife has just lost her smell and taste but otherwise she is well.’ So she is likely infected, and she is spreading it with a very mild form.”

A study from South Korea, where widespread testing has been done, found that 30 percent of some 2,000 patients who tested positive for the coronavirus reported experiencing anosmia.


Hendrik Streeck, a German virologist from the University of Bonn who went from house to house in the country’s Heinsberg district to interview coronavirus patients, has said in interviews that at least two-thirds of the more than 100 he talked to with mild disease reported experiencing loss of smell and taste lasting several days.

Another physician who studied a cluster of coronavirus patients in Germany said in an email that roughly half of the patients had experienced a smell or taste disorder, and that the sensory loss usually presented after the first symptoms of respiratory illness, but could be used to distinguish people who should be tested.

Dr. Clemens Wendtner, a professor of medicine at the Academic Teaching Hospital of Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, said that the patients regained their ability to smell after a few days or weeks, and that the loss occurred regardless of how sick they got or whether they were congested. Using nasal drops or sprays did not help, Dr. Wendtner said.

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Several American patients who have had symptoms consistent with the coronavirus, but who have not been tested or are still awaiting test results, described losing their senses of smell and taste, even though their noses were clear and they were not congested.

Andrew Berry, 30, developed a fever and body aches about 10 days ago, and then a sore throat and debilitating headaches. He tested negative for influenza and has not gotten the result of a coronavirus test taken four days ago, but his physician was convinced that he had the virus, he said.

Now, Mr. Berry said, he literally cannot smell the coffee.

“Even with a clear nose, I just realized I couldn’t smell the food that I was cooking, and I couldn’t taste the food that I was making,” said Mr. Berry, a tattoo artist based in Orlando, Fla. He was cooking a plantain dish with onions and vinegar, yet he could not smell it.

Amy Plattmier, a woman from Brooklyn, was not tested for the coronavirus during a recent illness, but her husband then became sick and had a positive test. Ms. Plattmier said she usually had a very sensitive nose, but now could barely smell anything — not the bleach she was using to clean the counters, which usually makes her feel nauseated, or the dog’s accident in the bathroom, which she cleaned up.

Mr. Berry has also lost some weight, because he has not had much of an appetite. “Hopefully it’s not a prolonged effect,” he said. “I can imagine it changes the quality of life.”

David Kirkpatrick contributed reporting from London.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/22/...mell-taste.html#click=https://t.co/IhO03Id2Bt
 

Bette Davis Eyes

Melanated Queen
So aggravated right now.


This lady keep telling me to boil orange peels and cayenne. Before this COVID came around I've been fighting the Flu for 30 years darn near. I stay on top of my vitamins. I cook religiously with garlic/ginger.

You keep telling me none of that will keep mucus out of me, okayy!

You do what works for you. Im not into mass panic over stuff i've been dealing with all my life. I wash my hands, I don't touch doors, I don't touch my face. All this new hysteria is getting on my darn nerves with everyone wanting to tell me what works for them.

Thanks for the info.

( venting)
 
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werenumber2

Well-Known Member
Y’all...I made this post in the Health Thoughts thread on December 6, 2019:

I came down with an awful sinus infection and bronchitis the Sunday before Thanksgiving so I haven’t been to CrossFit in almost 2 weeks. My coaches messaged me like “girl, where are you??” :laugh: Hoping to get back at it on Monday. This is the longest I’ve gone without working out in 9 months

I couldn’t smell or properly taste anything for 8 days so Thanksgiving was pretty much cancelled :cry3:. Of all the weeks to get sick!

:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
 

Maguerite

Well-Known Member
So helpful, thank you.
Great thread.
To put things in perspective, Italy had its first confirmed case of the virus on February 20th, 2020. Yesterday, March 21st, 2020, just 30 days later, they had approximately 5000 deaths, with approximately 800 deaths in one night, last night. As of this minute, today, they have approximately 54,000 confirmed cases. The virus moves fast. That's a time frame of only four (4) weeks from patient one to today.

When you go out:
  • Wear your masks when you are out.
  • Googles if possible.
  • Cotton balls in ears with a drop of essential oil. Make sure the part of the cotton ball is with the essential oil is on the outside of the ear.
  • Use hand sanitizer.
  • Cover your hair.
When you return to your home:
  • Wipe down your inside door handles and lock.
  • Wipe down your jackets, purses, outer wear, keys , shoes and telephones when you come back to the house.
  • Rinse your face.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Flush your eyes and nose as part of your cleansing routine.
  • Wipe down your faucets and doors and light switches that led into the bathroom or place where you washed your hands and face.
  • Drink a cleansing tea as mentioned above by someone in another post.
  • At minimum, have some water.
To put things in perspective, Italy had its first confirmed case of the virus on February 20th, 2020. Yesterday, March 21st, 2020, just 30 days later, they had approximately 5000 deaths, with approximately 800 deaths in one night, last night. As of this minute, today, they have approximately 54,000 confirmed cases. The virus moves fast. That's a time frame of only four (4) weeks from patient one to today.

When you go out:
  • Wear your masks when you are out.
  • Googles if possible.
  • Cotton balls in ears with a drop of essential oil. Make sure the part of the cotton ball is with the essential oil is on the outside of the ear.
  • Use hand sanitizer.
  • Cover your hair.
When you return to your home:
  • Wipe down your inside door handles and lock.
  • Wipe down your jackets, purses, outer wear, keys , shoes and telephones when you come back to the house.
  • Rinse your face.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Flush your eyes and nose as part of your cleansing routine.
  • Wipe down your faucets and doors and light switches that led into the bathroom or place where you washed your hands and face.
  • Drink a cleansing tea as mentioned above by someone in another post.
  • At minimum, have some water.
 

Jmartjrmd

Well-Known Member
This is what,I was saying about younger people z few weeks ago. I wish they didnt put it out there so heavily that younger people weren't getting into trouble when they get it...but the highest death rate remains the elderly.

Top U.S. health officials are "looking very closely" at reports that a much higher percentage of younger Americans than expected need hospitalization as a result of contracting the coronavirus, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Sunday.

Fauci was responding to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which, after studying more than 4,000 cases in the U.S., showed that about 40 percent of those who were hospitalized for the virus as of March 16 were ages 20 to 54. Among the most critical cases, 12 percent of intensive care admissions were among those ages 20 to 44, while 36 percent were for those 45 to 64.

About 80 percent of people in the U.S. who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over, with the highest percentage among those over 85.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

Asked about the new numbers on CBS' "Face the Nation," Fauci said they highlighted "a very important critical issue that we're looking very closely at."

"It looks like there is a big difference between that demography from China and what we're seeing in Europe," Fauci said. Data based on China's outbreak suggested that older people were more at risk.

"Now we have to look at the young people who are getting seriously ill from the European cohort and make sure that it isn't just driven by the fact that they have underlying conditions, because we know that underlying conditions — all bets are off no matter how young you are if you have an underlying, serious medical condition. You're going to potentially get into trouble," Fauci added.

"But if they don't have underlying conditions, that will be something we will have to really examine as to why we're seeing it here but we didn't see it in China. So we're going to look at that very closely."

Speaking on CNN's "State of the Union," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., said young people need to take the risks seriously.

"I've been speaking about this for over a week now, and if you are a young person in America today, you need to stay home," she said. "There was so much messaging about how coronavirus is only impacting older people and that younger people don't have to worry about it for their personal health. Well, let me tell you something, in the state of New York, about 55 percent of our cases are with folks 18 to 49."

"And when you have that ... you are able to be directly impacted," she added. "You're going to get your mom sick. You're going to get your grandparents sick. You're going to get people you care for sick if you are asymptomatic. So you may not think that you have it and you very well might. And you especially might if you continue to go out and live life as usual."

And on ABC News' "This Week," Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer pointed to a recent COVID-19 case in her state involving an infant to say the idea that "only one segment of our population that is exposed or in danger is ridiculous."

"We have to all take this seriously, and every one of us needs to do our part," she said. "Assume you are carrying COVID-19 and wash your hands, practice social distancing, stay at home if you're not absolutely needed to be outside of your home. And if you do go outside, keep that 6-foot distance from others. We all have to play our part to mitigate the spread and to save our health care system."

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts about the coronavirus outbreak

Fauci said on "Face the Nation" that he does not expect the U.S.'s experience with the outbreak to turn into that of Italy, which has become one of the hardest-hit areas.

"I mean, obviously, things are unpredictable, you can't make any definitive statement, but if you look at the dynamics of the outbreak in Italy, we don't know why they are suffering so terribly, but there is a possibility that many of us believe that early on they did not shut out the input of infections that originated in China and came to other parts of the world," Fauci said before touting the Trump administration's move to restrict travel from China and then parts of Europe earlier this year.

"Again, I don't know why this is happening [in Italy] to such an extent," Fauci said. "But once you get so many of these spread out, they spread exponentially, and you can never keep up with this tsunami. And I think that's what our colleagues and, unfortunately, our dear friends in Italy are facing."

Italy was "so overwhelmed from the beginning," Fauci said, "that they can't play catch-up."

Fauci said he has "no doubt" that the virus is mutating, although experts "have not seen thus far any type of change in the way it's acting. But we are keeping a very close eye on it, because it is conceivable that it could mutate and change some of the ways that it performs."
 

TrulyBlessed

Well-Known Member
This is scary. Sounds like no matter where we are after 15 days he wants everyone to get back to normal soon and remove restrictions even if it means spreading the disease further. Meanwhile the surgeon general is saying things are about to get worse and restrictions need to continue. Trump is a sadist. As long as he’s happy he wants everybody dead.

 

Lute

Well-Known Member
@werenumber2 I'm glad your better now.
This is scary. Sounds like no matter where we are after 15 days he wants everyone to get back to normal soon and remove restrictions even if it means spreading the disease further. Meanwhile the surgeon general is saying things are about to get worse and restrictions need to continue. Trump is a sadist. As long as he’s happy he wants everybody dead.

What he doesn't realize that in 15 days. The people who are just came back from spring break, and who just issued #stay at home will show and start to have symptoms
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
Our Health Department where work is doing temp screens for everyone who comes to the door. They've turned several people away with high temps and referred them to their PCP so we are doing some services over the phone anyway. But many who needed Depo shots have been turned away....
 

sunshinebeautiful

Well-Known Member
I literally *just* came on the board to share an article related to this. Here's what I shared to my FB earlier today:

Just wanted to share this article in the event that it helps someone. Apparently, loss of sense of smell/touch is emerging as a potential coronavirus symptom. The major take-away being: if you lose your sense of smell or taste suddenly it can be a sign of infection, and to self-isolate, even if you have not experienced other symptoms. You may have a mild case and can still transmit the virus to others.

Article link: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/22/health/coronavirus-symptoms-smell-taste.html

As soon as I posted this article to my Facebook, an old friend from high school who lives in NJ shared that he and 5 of his close friends all suddenly lost their sense of smell and taste, and immediately moved to self-isolation. They still haven't been able to be tested to confirm, but decided to err on the side of caution anyway. It also brought to mind an interview I saw about a week ago with a young lady out in California - who she and her friends were eventually confirmed positive - and she mentioned that they all had lost their sense of smell/taste.
 

Chicoro

From Shea Butter Hater to Shea Butter Caker!
I passed on the recipe with xylitol to cleanse the nasal passages to someone. I speak to this person on a regular basis. I noticed immediately they sounded less stuff and very clear. The person told me that the nasal wash made a difference and that they noticed the difference.

Xylitol Nasal Wash from up thread: Helps to cleanse the cilia
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 tablespoon xylitol
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 pinch of baking soda powder
  • 4 drops of grapefruit (optional for preserving mixture)
 

TrulyBlessed

Well-Known Member
@werenumber2 I'm glad your better now.

What he doesn't realize that in 15 days. The people who are just came back from spring break, and who just issued #stay at home will show and start to have symptoms
Hopefully most states have governors in place with a brain who can continue to enforce restrictions because this idiot doesn’t care. He’s taking medical advice from his economic advisor. His priority is the economy but he doesn’t realize that failure to continue to take the ongoing necessary steps to curb this health crisis will only make things worse including the economy.
 

cutiepiebabygirl

Well-Known Member
This is what,I was saying about younger people z few weeks ago. I wish they didnt put it out there so heavily that younger people weren't getting into trouble when they get it...but the highest death rate remains the elderly.

Top U.S. health officials are "looking very closely" at reports that a much higher percentage of younger Americans than expected need hospitalization as a result of contracting the coronavirus, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Sunday.

Fauci was responding to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which, after studying more than 4,000 cases in the U.S., showed that about 40 percent of those who were hospitalized for the virus as of March 16 were ages 20 to 54. Among the most critical cases, 12 percent of intensive care admissions were among those ages 20 to 44, while 36 percent were for those 45 to 64.

About 80 percent of people in the U.S. who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over, with the highest percentage among those over 85.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

Asked about the new numbers on CBS' "Face the Nation," Fauci said they highlighted "a very important critical issue that we're looking very closely at."

"It looks like there is a big difference between that demography from China and what we're seeing in Europe," Fauci said. Data based on China's outbreak suggested that older people were more at risk.

"Now we have to look at the young people who are getting seriously ill from the European cohort and make sure that it isn't just driven by the fact that they have underlying conditions, because we know that underlying conditions — all bets are off no matter how young you are if you have an underlying, serious medical condition. You're going to potentially get into trouble," Fauci added.

"But if they don't have underlying conditions, that will be something we will have to really examine as to why we're seeing it here but we didn't see it in China. So we're going to look at that very closely."

Speaking on CNN's "State of the Union," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., said young people need to take the risks seriously.

"I've been speaking about this for over a week now, and if you are a young person in America today, you need to stay home," she said. "There was so much messaging about how coronavirus is only impacting older people and that younger people don't have to worry about it for their personal health. Well, let me tell you something, in the state of New York, about 55 percent of our cases are with folks 18 to 49."

"And when you have that ... you are able to be directly impacted," she added. "You're going to get your mom sick. You're going to get your grandparents sick. You're going to get people you care for sick if you are asymptomatic. So you may not think that you have it and you very well might. And you especially might if you continue to go out and live life as usual."

And on ABC News' "This Week," Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer pointed to a recent COVID-19 case in her state involving an infant to say the idea that "only one segment of our population that is exposed or in danger is ridiculous."

"We have to all take this seriously, and every one of us needs to do our part," she said. "Assume you are carrying COVID-19 and wash your hands, practice social distancing, stay at home if you're not absolutely needed to be outside of your home. And if you do go outside, keep that 6-foot distance from others. We all have to play our part to mitigate the spread and to save our health care system."

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts about the coronavirus outbreak

Fauci said on "Face the Nation" that he does not expect the U.S.'s experience with the outbreak to turn into that of Italy, which has become one of the hardest-hit areas.

"I mean, obviously, things are unpredictable, you can't make any definitive statement, but if you look at the dynamics of the outbreak in Italy, we don't know why they are suffering so terribly, but there is a possibility that many of us believe that early on they did not shut out the input of infections that originated in China and came to other parts of the world," Fauci said before touting the Trump administration's move to restrict travel from China and then parts of Europe earlier this year.

"Again, I don't know why this is happening [in Italy] to such an extent," Fauci said. "But once you get so many of these spread out, they spread exponentially, and you can never keep up with this tsunami. And I think that's what our colleagues and, unfortunately, our dear friends in Italy are facing."

Italy was "so overwhelmed from the beginning," Fauci said, "that they can't play catch-up."

Fauci said he has "no doubt" that the virus is mutating, although experts "have not seen thus far any type of change in the way it's acting. But we are keeping a very close eye on it, because it is conceivable that it could mutate and change some of the ways that it performs."
The American diet /obesity may be a factor here.
 

Jmartjrmd

Well-Known Member
This would be amazing for so many people.




EDITORS' PICK|6,156 views|Mar 23, 2020,02:01pm EDT
House Democrats Propose Widespread Student Loan Forgiveness Due To Coronavirus
Adam S. Minsky, Esq.Senior Contributor
Personal Finance
I’m an attorney focused on helping student loan borrowers.


Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., left, and Rep.[+]
ASSOCIATED PRESS
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House Democrats have unveiled a proposal to cancel student loan debt for millions of student loan borrowers amid the escalating Coronavirus crisis.

The bill, called the Student Debt Emergency Relief Act, would do the following:



  • The bill would cancel $30,000 in federal student loans for borrowers.
  • The student loan forgiveness would be tax-free. In other words, the debt cancellation would not be taxed as income.
  • For student loan borrowers who continue to have student loan payments due even after the $30,000 in cancellation, the government would assume their monthly payments so borrowers can remain on track for loan forgiveness programs or loan payoff.
  • All involuntary collections efforts by the U.S. Department of Education — including wage garnishments, tax refund seizures, and offsets of Social Security — would be suspended.


Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), one of the lead sponsors, said: “During this unprecedented crisis, no one should have to choose between paying their student loan payment, putting food on the table or keeping themselves and their families safe and healthy. We must prioritize debt cancellation for the 45 million student loan borrowers who are struggling to pay off their debt during this difficult time.”

The proposal mirrors a similar plan put forth by Senate Democrats last week, although the House bill goes further and calls for a greater amount of student loan forgiveness.

Currently, student loan borrowers impacted by the Coronavirus crisis have limited options, which include an interest rate freeze and a temporary forbearance. But many borrowers are not even eligible for those options at this time.

Democrats and Republicans in Congress are currently in negotiations for the final terms of a massive stimulus bill to address the Coronavirus crisis and the associated economic collapse. It is unclear what, if any, relief will be provided to student loan borrowers as part of that package.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.


Adam S. Minsky, Esq.

I’m an attorney with a unique practice devoted entirely to helping student loan borrowers. I provide counsel, legal assistance, and direct advocacy for borrowers on a

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