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Types of Protein

LuvlyRain3

Well-Known Member
There has been a lot of questions about protein lately from us newbies. So I decided to go on a search. Lhcf new search engine sucks so I am sorry if I'm just repeating a thread but here's what I found from my google hunt:

Collagen Protein--known for increasing elasticity in the hair

Silk Protein--known for softening the hair

Wheat Protein--a moisturizing and strengthening protein. known for increasing the hair's ability to maintain & receive moisture also.

*Keratin Protein the(hair product) proteins and is actually the one that hair is made from. This one re-structures hair that has been damaged or broken down by chemicals. It helps to replace the amino acid cysteine which is the main one lost during chemical processing. This is the heavy duty protein.

*Vegetable protein -- Vegetable protein absorbs more easily into the hair shaft [than anima protein] and does not create build-up, leaves the hair very shiny, radiant, luxuriant, and healthy

*Animal protein -- Animal protein breaks down into fatty acids, which coat the hair and create residual build-up

Silk Amino Acids/Protein--Natural silk is the strongest, natural fiber known to mankind Discovered in Japan and has been used for centuries in all kinds of products that require durability. Silk has a tiny molecule that can penetrate the entire hair shaft deeper than all other proteins without adding any weight leaving the hair feeling clean and non-greasy

Keratin Protein More Indept:

*Keratin protein--this will re-structure and strengthen the hair cuticle (the outer layer only & the most important layer) The keratin in some reconstructors should not leave your hair hard like the Aphogee Treatment for damaged hair (which contains hydrolyzed animal protein). This treatment hardens on your hair for a reason and is used with mild heat. A moisturizing conditioner is a must with this in hair for a reason and is used with mild heat. A moisturizing conditioner is a must with this in order to soften like Keracare's humecto. Reconstructors that contain keratin and other proteins are supposed to have enough moisture to soften the hair therefore leaving your hair with a nice protein/moisture balance."

* Hydrolyzed Keratin Protein or Keratin Amino Acids--this means that the Keratin molecules have been broken down and are small enough to go beyond the cuticle and penetrate the hair shaft. It will strengthen all 3 layers of the hair. That is why the term "deep conditioning" technically only refers to this kind of treatment using penetrating proteins.

*Hydrolyzed Human Hair Keratin--This is an exact match for the keratin your hair has (or has lot due to chemical processing). This is the highest quality and most potent keratin that can be used in hair products.

Hope this helps somebody like it helped me.

ETA: here's a couple of other proteins

Hydrolyzed soy protein: Enhances hair manageability, contains cystine for hair strenthening and nourishment

Hydrolyzed oat protein: us used as a conditioning and moisturizing agent in hair products
 

Nix08

Relaxed, 4B
Thank you - nice and concise, I can print it and stick it in my journal for future reference because you are right - the search engine sucks!
 

D.Lisha

New Member
Absolutely love this thread!
I've been recently experiencing increased shedding...so i'm at the point now where i'm trying to find the culprit:
*Either too MUCH protein
*Too LITTLE protein and too MUCH moisture
:scratchch
Looks like I might be doing a hair care product- makeover soon o_O
 

LuvlyRain3

Well-Known Member
You welcome ladies. I just recently decided to pay more attention to product ingredients. i was glad to finally learn what proteins to avoid and what to include in my regimen.
 

divachyk

Instagram: adaybyjay
Bump - protein trips me up every time. I struggle with this topic and I have a lot of protein related questions. Can someone either answer or point me to some threads?

Help me categorize the proteins listed above to help me understand which are considered hard protein/non-moisturizing vs moisturizing (if that's the right way to differentiate).

I think collagen, silk and wheat would be more moisturizing, right?
And, keratin, vegetable and animal would be considered hard protein, right?

Where does Silk Amino Acids fall and what use are they?

Is there a difference between "hydrolyzed wheat protein" and "wheat protein"? I notice the listing above only lists "wheat protein" but doesn't use the word hydrolyzed. (for some reason I always thought hydrolyzed meant hard protein)

I read somewhere that avocado oil is a protein, is this true? I know evco acts like a protein for some. Are there other protein acting oils?
 
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zenith

New Member
OP is there a way you could add examples of the different kind of proteins?

This thread would make a nice sticky esp for newbies and a brush up for the vets as well.
 

LuvlyRain3

Well-Known Member
Let me get my search on... I'll be back.

OP is there a way you could add examples of the different kind of proteins?


I think that the best example I could comes up with would be aphogee 2 minute keratin. It has hydrolyzed keratin, hydrolyzed vegetable and collagen in it. No wonder my hair loves this stuff.

I'll check some of my other favorite products and see if I have examples of each protein.
 

LuvlyRain3

Well-Known Member
@divachick I think I have the answer to one of your questions. I had to go back to my chemistry days for it. To hydrolyze something means to have it interact with water causing decomposition.

I think by hydrolyzing wheat protein you make it easier to penetrate the hair. When I look up the definition of hydrolyzed wheat protein and wheat protein I get basically the same definition for both.
 

LuvlyRain3

Well-Known Member
Bump - protein trips me up every time. I struggle with this topic and I have a lot of protein related questions. Can someone either answer or point me to some threads?

Help me categorize the proteins listed above to help me understand which are considered hard protein/non-moisturizing vs moisturizing (if that's the right way to differentiate).

I think collagen, silk and wheat would be more moisturizing, right?
And, keratin, vegetable and animal would be considered hard protein, right?

Where does Silk Amino Acids fall and what use are they?

Is there a difference between "hydrolyzed wheat protein" and "wheat protein"? I notice the listing above only lists "wheat protein" but doesn't use the word hydrolyzed. (for some reason I always thought hydrolyzed meant hard protein)

I read somewhere that avocado oil is a protein, is this true? I know evco acts like a protein for some. Are there other protein acting oils?

divachyk I think I finally have the answer your looking for.

For protein like wheat, collagen, silk, etc I would say that these proteins contribute to the overall quality of you hair. They don't necessarily moisturize the hair but the do help the hair to take in and maintain moisture (wheat protein, oat protein).

Other proteins (like collagen, vegetable, silk and soy) help to improve some of the characteristics of your hair. For example collagen improves elasticity which would be a great protein to include in your regimen if you manipulate your hair alot. Sikh and soy protein are suppose to strengthen the hair but I wouldn't put them in the category of hard protein. Vegetable protein is suppose to add shine to the hair.

Keratin proteins on the other hand, mimic our hairs own protein. These proteins are suppose to give back some of the protein that our hair loses from everyday things (aging, manipulation, regular wear and tear). These types of protein are the only kind of protein that I would consider a hard protein. Also for a product to be considered a hard protein I would have to look at other things. The other ingredients in the products and the order of the ingredients. I wouldn't consider a product a hard protein if keratin was like the ingredient before fragrance which if usually the last ingredient.

Hth.
 

LushLox

Well-Known Member
*Hydrolyzed Human Hair Keratin--This is an exact match for the keratin your hair has (or has lot due to chemical processing). This is the highest quality and most potent keratin that can be used in hair products.

This is why I like the Joico K Pak products because the whole line has this particular type of keratin in it. My hair has definitely benefited from using it.
 

WaistLengthDreams

Well-Known Member
OP is there a way you could add examples of the different kind of proteins?

This thread would make a nice sticky esp for newbies and a brush up for the vets as well.

Keracare Super Reconstructor - contains (Collagan Amino Acids, Hydrolyzed Collagan)

Aphogee Two Step Protein Treatment - contains (Hydrolyzed Collagan, Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein

Light / Medium Protein Treament I still have or once used:

Aphogee 2 Minute Reconstructor - contains (Hydrolyzed Keratin, Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein, Collagan Amino Acid

Affirm Fiberguard 5in1 Reconstructor - contains (Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein)

Affirm Postive Link Conditioner - contains (Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein)


Motions CPR Treatment Conditioner - contains (Hydrolyzed Collagan)

(Source)
 

prettyhair73

Well-Known Member
At any grocery store on the aisle with Jell-O and Gelatin. I get Knox plain gelatin.

Directions:

-Pour a packet or two (depending on how much hair you have) in a glass bowl or mug.
-Add distilled water (about a half of the cup)
-Stir to dissolve the clumps
-Microwave for no more than 30 seconds

You can do 1 of two things:

Add your shampoo to the mix

OR

Apply it after a shampoo and rinse with lukewarm water

I did this more often when I had a relaxer and it would make my hair really soft. Be sure to rinse it all out so it doesn't turn "jelly" and get stuck in your hair.

@prettyhair73 where do you buy that? How do you use it?
 

greenandchic

Well-Known Member
I like the Ion Repair Solutions Reconstructor Treatment from Sally. It has Hydrolyzed Keratin which my hair loves.
 
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