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Warning: N-Acetyl Cysteine may be bad for you

sunshinelady

New Member
This Common Antioxidant Supplement Could Cause You Loads of Trouble

Researchers at the University of Virginia Health System have discovered troubling side effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a common antioxidant used in nutritional and bodybuilding supplements. NAC can form a red blood cell-derived molecule called nitrosothiol that fools your body into thinking there’s an oxygen shortage, which can lead to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
PAH is a serious condition, where the arteries in the lungs narrow, increasing the blood pressure in your lungs, causing the right side of your heart to swell.
Lead researcher Dr. Ben Gaston, noted that this is an entirely new understanding of how oxygen is sensed by the body. As it turns out, your body responds to the nitrosothiols, which are created when a decreased amount of oxygen is carried by red blood cells -- not to the amount of oxygen dissolved in the blood.
So far, studies have only been performed on mice. The next step is to determine the threshold at which the antioxidant becomes detrimental to heart and lung function in humans.
Journal of Clinical Investigation September, 2007; 117(9):2592-601 (Free Full Text Report)
Physorg.com September 4, 2007



Dr. Mercola's Comments: N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is an acetylated amino acid and a precursor of glutathione, another potent antioxidant that prevents free radical damage from toxic exposures.

NAC is also a common emergency room treatment for people who have overdosed on acetaminophen (the active ingredient in pain relievers like Tylenol).
Interestingly,NAC is actually used to treat several types of lung disease, and although this animal study connects it with constriction of lung arteries, at least one other study has linked NAC with improved blood flow, stating NAC might increase the biologic effects of nitric oxide by combining with it to form S-nitrosothiol, which is a potent vasodilator. They found that NAC also increases the expression of nitric oxide synthase and may thus improve blood flow as well.
Since I don’t frequently use supplements, I consulted one of my friends, Dr. William LaValley from Austin, Texas, who is an expert in this area and has reviewed the literature thoroughly. He successfully uses supplements as a therapeutic tool in many chronic conditions including cancer.
He felt that PAH may be species specific and possibly won’t happen in humans, and more importantly, the study used much higher doses than are generally used in humans. As mentioned, there are many studies supporting the anti-oxidant benefit of NAC for pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis, post-radiation, and other high oxidant conditions. His conclusion, and I agree, is that a little is probably ok - even good for you. He has used NAC liberally in his therapeutic protocols for nearly 20 years and has not observed any problems with it. However using large quantities is probably not good for you. Long-term high doses are probably not so good for several reasons - including the possibility of PAH.

The study says that the doses are higher than usual in humans - but we know that the supplement manufacturers have been making 500mg NAC caps and selling them by the truckload for years. My biggest concern is the use of NAC by cancer patients who think it is helping - when in fact it may be harmful to them by protecting cancer cells and counteracting what potential benefit they may get from some conventional treatments. It's a thorny issue.

So, if used therapeutically, it should be used in low doses for 'prevention.' High doses should be restricted to disease/stress states that have high likelihood of high reactive oxygen species generation (such as trauma, certain types of infection, malnutrition, and certain types of toxicity).
Dr. LaValley feels that 200-500mg once a day is probably ok in most non-cancer cases. NAC is an important consideration for inclusion, at some reasonable dose, in anti-aging formulas.
However, please remember that the best way to get your antioxidants is to make sure you’re getting them from whole foods, not from supplements, which are often isolated synthetics rather than the readily bioavailable version. What you need is the Goldilock’s equation – not too many and not too few antioxidants – to achieve and maintain optimal health, and it is quite easy to overdose when you take supplements. Fortunately, your body does a phenomenal job of self-regulating many of these levels if you supply it with wholesome, healthy foods and limit your intake of processed foods, which are frequently loaded with artificial chemicals.
Normalizing your insulin and leptin levels is also quite helpful, as elevated insulin and leptin levels cause absolute biochemical havoc in your body and worsen nearly every major part of your physiology. Normalizing your blood sugar will raise your glutathione levels naturally, rather than taking glutathione or precursor supplements.
Glutathione, along with vitamin E, vitamin C and alpha lipoic acid are the basic antioxidants. Some nutritional authorities recommend you take it as a supplement, or take an NAC supplement. There are problems with both. First, the form of glutathione that works best is the reduced form, which is very difficult to absorb orally. Secondly, I advise against using NAC if you still have mercury amalgam fillings because it could interfere with the detoxification of the mercury.
It is much better to get your glutathione through items like alpha lipoic acid that regenerates glutathione. It also has the added ability to generate other antioxidants such as vitamins C and E. The best sources of alpha lipoic acid are red meat and organ meats. Just make sure to stick with grass-fed organic meats, to get the maximum nutrient content and none of the added antibiotics or pesticides.
Glutamine is also a useful nutrient that improves intestinal health and also serves as a direct precursor to glutathione, and some investigators believe it to be the rate-limiting nutrient for glutathione formation. However, in large quantities it can be problematic as Dr. Blaylock outlines in his book “Excitotoxins.”
 
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manegoal

New Member
I whole-heartily agree that the best nutrition will come from whole foods. If you look up any herb, supplement and some vitamins on medline plus, you will see almost all come with some risks. I recently looked up flax + horsetail and I must say it had me thinking about giving up synthetic vitamins and supplements. :nono: but I must take iron . Lately, I have been juicing and increasing my variety of fruits and veggies.
 

Serenity_Peace

Genius never dies!
Women should be careful taking amino acids, anyway, because our kidneys have a harder time processing them. I stop taking NAC because it made me gain too much weight and I was doing weights 3 days a week, but I was getting too bulky. :nono:
 

lollyoo

Active Member
I whole-heartily agree that the best nutrition will come from whole foods. If you look up any herb, supplement and some vitamins on medline plus, you will see almost all come with some risks. I recently looked up flax + horsetail and I must say it had me thinking about giving up synthetic vitamins and supplements. :nono: but I must take iron . Lately, I have been juicing and increasing my variety of fruits and veggies.

I AGREE.
Back in 2006 when i first join the forum i actually experience delayed ovulation from all the vitamins i was talking. I now only use skin, hair and nails at the recommended dosage.
eating healthily is best no doubt.
 

Irresistible

New Member
I ran across this information early in my looking into using l-cysteine

The doctor that responded to this report said those mice or rats were given ridiculous amounts of NAC or L-cysteine , so there is no way for that report to be accurate and apply

I for one decided the benefits of the supplement is so great health wise, and hair health that I was going to take it and as with anything BE REASONABLE with it. I am not into mega dosing and I read all that is needed to be taken with this for maximum benefit and absorption and did just that

I am very please with the results and these reports dont worry me because I wont be taking mega doses like given to those lab rats.

I take 250- 500mg a day , and no more than that. when I take the 250 I just simply open the capsule and take half the powder inside into my hand and lick it off and take a sip of something and swallow. This supplement is HUGELY beneficial to just write off on a report of megadosing on rats

I'm not writing it off
 

Carolina18

New Member
I take 250- 500mg a day , and no more than that. when I take the 250 I just simply open the capsule and take half the powder inside into my hand and lick it off and take a sip of something and swallow. This supplement is HUGELY beneficial to just write off on a report of megadosing on rats

What benefits have you derived from it Iris?
 

Supergirl

With Love & Silk
I ran across this information early in my looking into using l-cysteine

The doctor that responded to this report said those mice or rats were given ridiculous amounts of NAC or L-cysteine , so there is no way for that report to be accurate and apply

I for one decided the benefits of the supplement is so great health wise, and hair health that I was going to take it and as with anything BE REASONABLE with it. I am not into mega dosing and I read all that is needed to be taken with this for maximum benefit and absorption and did just that

I am very please with the results and these reports dont worry me because I wont be taking mega doses like given to those lab rats.

I take 250- 500mg a day , and no more than that. when I take the 250 I just simply open the capsule and take half the powder inside into my hand and lick it off and take a sip of something and swallow. This supplement is HUGELY beneficial to just write off on a report of megadosing on rats

I'm not writing it off

I agree that it is important to look @ the specifics of a scientific study before deciding to generalize to an entire population. :up:

So, what do LHCFers take N-Acetyl Cysteine for?
 

Irresistible

New Member
I agree that it is important to look @ the specifics of a scientific study before deciding to generalize to an entire population. :up:

So, what do LHCFers take N-Acetyl Cysteine for?

let me get that info for you........

*Technical Information*
L-CYSTEINE - Amino acid peptide bond constructing up to 18% of your hair that provides strength, shine and structure. Cysteine increases hair shaft diameter and hair growth density. Foods high in Cysteine include eggs, muscle protein, garlic, onions, Brussells sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, beans and milk. At least 500 mg. of this keratin-forming amino acid must be taken each day to even have an effect on hair. Cysteine is a powerful cell defender that acts as an antioxidant and also contains sulfur, known as nature's beauty mineral. A deficiency in sulfur is characterized by atrophied sebaceous glands which lubricate the scalp from the Essential Fatty Acids. Vitamin C in two and one-half times the amount of Cysteine, Vitamin B-6, and co-action of all 22 amino acids provide optimum use of L-Cysteine. In order for Cysteine to be effective it must synergistically work with ALL other aminos. A missing amino acid is like a missing building block that collapses the entire structure.
 
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