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Why Black Women Lose Their Hair

rmwms

Well-Known Member
I'm just sharing an interesting read.

(BlackDoctor.org) -- Imagine how it must feel to be afraid to comb your hair, because you know that every time a comb or brush goes anywhere near it, clumps of hair fall out. Or to face the challenge of having to camouflage your thinning hair by pulling the few remaining strands over bare patches or placing hair pins at specific points, so that nobody will notice your hair is falling out. It isn't pleasant, but for various reasons, many women live through that experience everyday.
When it comes to hair loss, we all lose between 40 and 120 hairs on average every day. Given that we have around 120,000 hairs on our head, we can afford to lose some hair each day, especially as in normal circumstances the hair is replaced and grows at a rate of about 1cm per month. After a hair has finished its growing period, it goes into a period of rest and is eventually shed. And because there is a cycle to hair growth and hair loss, we don't end up bald. However, we can go through stages in our life when hair starts to thin out, and as we age our hair is more likely to become thinner.
Braiding
In Black women, a loss of hair or thin hair around the hairline is common. Trichologist Tony Maleedy believes that tight braiding at a young age is often to blame for thinning hair later on in life. "When the hair has been braided too tight, it puts pressure on the hair follicle over time, which leads to the formation of scar tissue in the follicle, and eventually hair will no longer grow. I find it personally very sad when I see Black women with very tightly braided hair, because I know the damage it does," says Tony. "I would also recommend that apart from avoiding tight braiding, for healthy hair, women should avoid products that contain petroleum oils, and look out instead for vegetable oils in products, for example coconut or almond oil", he adds.
Healthy Diet
Thinning hair isn't however just caused by tight braiding. Stress is also known to lead to hair thinning, becoming more fragile, or just simply falling out. Over-processing of hair with chemical treatments can also damage the hair and cause it to thin. Other factors include genetics, i.e. family history of hair loss and health problems.
Leading trichologist Philip Kingsley believes that diet plays a significant part in promoting healthy hair growth. He suggests that because hair is protein, one of the most important constituents of our diets should be protein, eaten at least he suggests at breakfast and lunch times. For healthy hair he recommends that we drink lots of water, keep salt to a minimum, avoid black tea and have alcohol only in moderation. He also suggests the following as a diet for healthy hair:
Breakfast
• Fresh fruit plus one or more of the following: cereal or muesli with skimmed or semi-skimmed milk, plus yogurt.
• Minimum two slices of whole wheat toast with cottage cheese, low fat cheese, lean ham or bacon.
• One or more eggs, fish or other protein.
Lunch
• Make sure that you drink at least eight glasses of water a day
• Lean meat, fish, chicken or cottage cheese (4/5oz)
• Vegetables, baked potato and mixed saladChoice of dessert
• Preferably fruit
Dinner
Dinner can be anything of your choice. (Remember to check with your doctor before following any diet plan)
The first thing to do if you notice that your hair is starting to thin, is to seek professional help, preferably from a trichologist. Hairdressers may be able to offer some help, but they tend to treat the symptoms rather than the cause of your hair problem. If you want a professional diagnosis as to what is causing your hair to thin, see a trichologist.
If you feel that you already know what is causing your hair to thin, there are an number of products available targeted at addressing the problem of thinning hair.
Hair Treatments
Phytologie has brought out Phytocane, a hair serum for thinning hair, which is specially designed to combat hair loss problems. Phytocane fights against thinning hair by opening up the scalp, stimulating cell and keratin production and improving circulation to the hair bulb. It can be used as a treatment and for general hair care.
Joy Miller from the Errol Douglas salon recommends the Nioxin range of products, which treat the ‘living portion of the hair in the scalp skin.’ In other words, the products concentrate on the living rather than the dead hair.
The range includes Bionutrient Cleanser to help reduce hair loss by improving the scalp. Scalp Therapy to deliver moisture to the scalp and hair, Bionutrient Treatment to nourish the roots, Cytogen designed to help in the advanced stages of thinning hair, Follicle Booster NX3 an intensive nutrient treatment for thin looking hair, and Structure and Strength a conditioner for damaged hair.
Bharti Vyas has also brought out a range to treat the scalp and promote healthy hair growth. The BV Scalp Polisher conditions and treats the scalp first, before the hair. It works works by exfoliating dead skin cells from the scalp, then cleansing
it. Specifically designed to treat conditions such as falling and dry hair, the range also includes a moisturiser, volumizer and Keshya Hair Oil, which when used regularly, helps to reduce dryness and irritability.
Organic Root Stimulator products are based on natural products, and are designed to work on the same principles that promote plant growth. The Fertilizing Balm contains 14 herbal extracts, and a phytic acid complex, which is used to exfoliate clogged follicles. Ideal for use on fragile hair.
Finally, Paul Mitchell’s Hair Repair Treatment is designed to repair fragile, damaged and chemically treated hair. It’s moisturising formula helps to restore strength, elasticity and shine.
Tips
Prevention is better than cure, and thinning hair can take a long time to repair, so look after your scalp and make sure you use good quality hair products, eat well and reduce the amount of stress in your life.
 

jamaraa

Well-Known Member
This article says little (w/ the exception of braiding) about how many BW handle their hair or have it handled. IMHO, the vast majority of hair loss is about the wrong sorts of manipulations AND using products/techniques that ARE NOT intended for African texturres be they in a natural or relaxed state.

IOW, the hair grows from the scalp just fine in most cases I suspect, but people LITERALLY pull it out or break it off.
 

Chaosbutterfly

Transition Over
LACK OF KNOWLEDGE AND AN UNTEACHABLE SPIRIT!

I was just about to say this....black women lose their hair because they don't know what they are doing.

And even when the lightbulb comes on, they turn it back off and KIM for the sake of style.
Case in point, Susan Taylor.



Every time I see her hair, I say a little prayer for the souls of her edges. :nono:

I just hope that more black women can find resources like LHCF. There's no need to have busted hair.
 

LadyPaniolo

New Member
I think the stress aspect needs more focus in our lives too. I have heard of so many black women who are in unhealthy relationships with men who treat them worse than something stuck to the bottom of a trash can.... and the woman's hair starts falling out in clumps.... especially while pregnant for some reason.

Myself, I had a horrible case of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (which was just as unpleasant as it sounds, if not worse) because of a triflin' behind ninja who KEPT me stressed out. Literally the day after I ended it, the symptoms disappeared and have not returned in the almost 8 years since. Stress is so real in its effect on our bodies.
 

jamaraa

Well-Known Member
I think the stress aspect needs more focus in our lives too. I have heard of so many black women who are in unhealthy relationships with men who treat them worse than something stuck to the bottom of a trash can.... and the woman's hair starts falling out in clumps.... especially while pregnant for some reason.

Myself, I had a horrible case of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (which was just as unpleasant as it sounds, if not worse) because of a triflin' behind ninja who KEPT me stressed out. Literally the day after I ended it, the symptoms disappeared and have not returned in the almost 8 years since. Stress is so real in its effect on our bodies.

This is such a great point about stress! It causes much shedding and leads to harsh handling of the hair (ie breakage). When your body is stressed, the 1st places it starts "cheating" is your hair, skin, and nails. So let's avoid stress as much as poss for yet ANOTHER good reason! :yep:
 

IDareT'sHair

PJ Rehabilitation Center
Case in point, Susan Taylor.

Everytime I see her hair, I say a little prayer for the souls of her edges. :nono:

I just hope that more black women can find resources like LHCF. There's no need to have busted hair.

:look:Girl, No You Didn't Just Say "The SOULS of Her Edges":lachen: Not the "Souls":lachen:
 

Br*nzeb*mbsh~ll

Well-Known Member
Not only does hair get ripped out of the scalp, but chemical relaxers melt hair right off the scalp...Many times our sistas suffer from damaged hair follicles as a result of chemical and thermal treatments - which impair healthy hair growth.
 

jamaraa

Well-Known Member
Not only does hair get ripped out of the scalp, but chemical relaxers melt hair right off the scalp...Many times our sistas suffer from damaged hair follicles as a result of chemical and thermal treatments - which impair healthy hair growth.

This is down to ignorance and stubbornness on the part of stylists. They are a whole 'nother category of the problem BW have w/ their hair health. A relaxer done properly and on intervals greater than many do (tho not necessarily as long as "stretchers") can be fine.

Many stylists simply refuse to keep up w/ new-better techniques and/or do things (literally behind their client's backs) to keep them dependent on them. It's simply unethical.

Since most women choose to be relaxed and will continue to do so, the people who do them should serve them better. After all, their clients are their bread and butter!
 

CurlyMoo

Well-Known Member
Miseducation, stubborness, laziness and neglect. Even with the right knowledge some women will NEVER change their ways. But we can lead by example. Once we make it popular to have healthy hair with healthy haircare practices then many others will start to take of themselves. We can't save every head, some women do not want to leave their comfort zone.
 

CurlyMoo

Well-Known Member
I was just about to say this....black women lose their hair because they don't know what they are doing.

And even when the lightbulb comes on, they turn it back off and KIM for the sake of style.
Case in point, Susan Taylor.



Every time I see her hair, I say a little prayer for the souls of her edges. :nono:

I just hope that more black women can find resources like LHCF. There's no need to have busted hair.

WOW, how long has she been rocking these microbraids. They're beautiful but her edges are gone. It's sad to see women with receding hairlines that can be easily fixed.
 

CurlyMoo

Well-Known Member
This is down to ignorance and stubbornness on the part of stylists. They are a whole 'nother category of the problem BW have w/ their hair health. A relaxer done properly and on intervals greater than many do (tho not necessarily as long as "stretchers") can be fine.

Many stylists simply refuse to keep up w/ new-better techniques and/or do things (literally behind their client's backs) to keep them dependent on them. It's simply unethical.

Since most women choose to be relaxed and will continue to do so, the people who do them should serve them better. After all, their clients are their bread and butter!

I agree but Stylist are there to serve us. Ignorant people usually get ignorant Stylists. Having a Stylist should not prohibit anyone from doing research to see what will make their hair healthy. Many women put their head in the Stylist's hands and just totally trust their judgement. I went through so many hairdressers and only liked a few. I can do better on my own thank you. No one should depend on a Stylist for their every haircare need. When you are at home you are responsible for the maintenance of your hair.
 

locabouthair

Well-Known Member
I agree but Stylist are there to serve us. Ignorant people usually get ignorant Stylists. Having a Stylist should not prohibit anyone from doing research to see what will make their hair healthy. Many women put their head in the Stylist's hands and just totally trust their judgement. I went through so many hairdressers and only liked a few. I can do better on my own thank you. No one should depend on a Stylist for their every haircare need. When you are at home you are responsible for the maintenance of your hair.

ITA!!! Jamaraa I see your point too. I think a lot of stylists are misinformed. I faithfully went to the salon and they didnt wash the perm out properly. So that was one reason why I lost my hair.

I know some girls who dont even wash their own hair. Nothing wrong with going to the salon but you need to be knowledgeable about your hair too. I left my hair in the stylists hand all I got was thin ends and bald spots.
 

CurlyMoo

Well-Known Member
ITA!!! Jamaraa I see your point too. I think a lot of stylists are misinformed. I faithfully went to the salon and they didnt wash the perm out properly. So that was one reason why I lost my hair.

I know some girls who dont even wash their own hair. Nothing wrong with going to the salon but you need to be knowledgeable about your hair too. I left my hair in the stylists hand all I got was thin ends and bald spots.

I got a relaxer as a tween which lead to some very painful teen years. I remember going to a kitchen stylist and getting home with huge knots on my scalp because the nit wit didn't wash out all the relaxer, she had to come to my kitchen and wash it out. This happend on several occasions.
 

jamaraa

Well-Known Member
I agree but Stylist are there to serve us. Ignorant people usually get ignorant Stylists. Having a Stylist should not prohibit anyone from doing research to see what will make their hair healthy. Many women put their head in the Stylist's hands and just totally trust their judgement. I went through so many hairdressers and only liked a few. I can do better on my own thank you. No one should depend on a Stylist for their every haircare need. When you are at home you are responsible for the maintenance of your hair.

Curly this is rather simplistic and ignoring ethical standards for professionsals, IMHO. It ignores the fact that many BW don't have the means or access to such info as this. Most women do not use the net for hair advice, that's a reality. Just because they are ignorant, they don't deserve shotty service.

Of course, I believe that most women should learn some basic hair maintenance; however, very few have the know how to access if a chemical process is being done correctly until AFTER the fact. After all, your back is turned to the stylists.

If people are paying for your services, you should offer them the best you can...whether they are ignorant or not. This is an issue of ethics.

The question was WHY so many are....this is a huge reason why.
 

jamaraa

Well-Known Member
ITA!!! Jamaraa I see your point too. I think a lot of stylists are misinformed. I faithfully went to the salon and they didnt wash the perm out properly. So that was one reason why I lost my hair.

I know some girls who dont even wash their own hair. Nothing wrong with going to the salon but you need to be knowledgeable about your hair too. I left my hair in the stylists hand all I got was thin ends and bald spots.

Either misinformed or lazy, but I'm sorry this happened to ya. Unfortunately this is common and how could you (non hairdresser) know that you weren't properly neutralized? That wasn't YOUR responsibility, but the professional's. Shame.
 

jamaraa

Well-Known Member
WOW, how long has she been rocking these microbraids. They're beautiful but her edges are gone. It's sad to see women with receding hairlines that can be easily fixed.

30+ years chile. When I was a very small kid, she had them then and she also had her edges. :blush::lachen::grin::yep::wallbash::rolleyes::sad::yawn::nono: Need I say more?
 

CurlyMoo

Well-Known Member
Curly this is rather simplistic and ignoring ethical standards for professionsals, IMHO. It ignores the fact that many BW don't have the means or access to such info as this. Most women do not use the net for hair advice, that's a reality. Just because they are ignorant, they don't deserve shotty service.

Of course, I believe that most women should learn some basic hair maintenance; however, very few have the know how to access if a chemical process is being done correctly until AFTER the fact. After all, your back is turned to the stylists.

If people are paying for your services, you should offer them the best you can...whether they are ignorant or not. This is an issue of ethics.

The question was WHY so many are....this is a huge reason why.

Hair stylist are a problem that was invited in. I'm not saying hair stylists shouldn't be held accountable nor expected to know something about hair like how to make it and keep it healthy. But there is only one person who is responsible for my hair and that's me. Sometimes you don't get what you pay for.
 

n_vizion

Well-Known Member
I agree with the theory that most stylists have no idea how to create healthy hair. When I used to go to get my hair done years ago, I was scolded for having walked around with so much new growth. Their is this belief out there that new growth is bad. So people relax every four weeks or so.

The good news is, I'm seeing more people out there with healthier hair than before....this information must be leaking out somehow and I'm excited about it!
 

jamaraa

Well-Known Member
Hair stylist are a problem that was invited in. I'm not saying hair stylists shouldn't be held accountable nor expected to know something about hair like how to make it and keep it healthy. But there is only one person who is responsible for my hair and that's me. Sometimes you don't get what you pay for.

Exactly...and you may not find it out until too late. Plenty here have. It took something bad to happen for them to do differently.
 

Chaosbutterfly

Transition Over
:look:Girl, No You Didn't Just Say "The SOULS of Her Edges":lachen: Not the "Souls":lachen:

Yes Miss Terri, I did indeed say the SOULS.
I just pray for them, so that wherever they are, they can get the peace and rest that they NEVER got in this world. :nono: Lord knows that they fought the good fight.
 

BrooklynSouth

New Member
The hair loss I notice most often is in women with long, long dreds which hang daily. I notice women with dreds which are kept trimmed to maximum brastrap and those who use pretty clips to distribute the weight differently do not have the thinning. I see the hair thinning also in those who fret about naps showing so relax monthly-the loss I see is usually at the edges and the back just below the crown. {Yes, LHCF has me constantly staring at hair!:blush:}
 
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