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Ari The Sperminator Strikes Again: New Mom 18 And Homeless

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
Not even a pandemic can stop the Sperminator from spreading his seed



Not even a global pandemic can stop the Sperminator.

Ari Nagel, the 44-year-old serial sperm donor who shot to fame in The Post four years ago, is still doing what he does best: getting women pregnant and growing his “family.”

Since the coronavirus gripped the US in March, he has welcomed five more kids into the world — bringing the total to 64. He met with four women in his home borough of Brooklyn and shared his seed with them. He’s also traveling the country to help out busy baby mamas.

Once a week he’s on “daddy day care” duty in North Brunswick, NJ, caring for 5-year-old Aria and 5-month-old Aliyah while their mom, Ashley, works. And he traveled to Virginia for quality time with 10-year-old Jacob. “I taught him to ride a bike!” Nagel said.

As for new spawn, there’s Aiden, born on Staten Island March 13; a baby girl born in Ohio on March 27; a boy born in Brooklyn’s Maimonides Medical Center on April 14; a boy born April 30 in southeast Asia; Lucia, born Wednesday in Buffalo; and a girl born in Ghana this week.

Nagel so far has met only one of them, Brooklyn baby Matthew Charles, whose MTA-employee mother gave him Nagel’s last name.



Here’s the whole article:

https://nypost.com/2020/05/16/not-even-a-pandemic-can-stop-the-sperminator-from-spreading-his-seed/


 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
“Now that flights are so cheap, women are coming out of the woodwork,” said Nagel, whose global requests almost always come with a free plane ticket. Last week, he was in Dallas to provide sperm for Jua’Naisha Henry, a 29-year-old who works in security.

“He’s an awesome guy,” said Henry. “He still wants to help, even during a pandemic.” She decided to try conceiving naturally with the Sperminator, social-distancing guidelines be damned. Nagel, meanwhile, enjoyed some liberation in Dallas, which relaxed its stay-at-home orders last week. Still, when he posted a maskless selfie from the plane, “All the baby mamas were yelling at me,” he said.


I do not understand having unprotected sex with a man who is obviously having unprotected sex with women all over the world but add to that during a pandemic where scientists have found that the virus can be found in the semen of the infected.

I already knew there was something wrong with him and every woman who signs up for this crazy but every update gives me a whole new level of crazy.
 

Ganjababy

Well-Known Member
I wonder if his wife left him yet. The girl must’ve experienced some kind of trauma. She sounds a bit off.

But these weird stories are too frequent these days in this younger generation. Someone was complaining to me about their family member who is 21 with her 3rd kid on the way. She suddenly decides that she is a lesbian. Moved in with her lesbian lover and is now pregnant for her lesbian lovers brother. Her mom and dad were both addicts, so her normal is not normal...
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member

Have Sperm, Will Travel​

Amidst a historic shortage at sperm banks nationwide, a new means of donation is on the rise: Facebook groups. Elaine Byrd got involved in the community first as a moderator, then as a recipient. That’s how she met Ari Nagel, aka the Sperminator, a superdonor with nearly a hundred biological children and counting. But could he possibly live up to his own hype?

By Rachel Monroe
Oct 20, 2021


Oct 20, 2021

sperm donor shortage facebook

Ari Nagel has biologically fathered nearly one hundred children around the world. He offers his services free of charge.
ANDREW HETHERINGTON

Elaine Byrd wanted a second child. The longing began after a hectic period in 2015, when she’d cared for three children under the age of two: her daughter, Ember, and a relative’s infant twins. Fortunately, Elaine, a kindergarten teacher in the suburbs of Memphis, liked babies. Years earlier, she'd fostered several children. At least with infants, there were no midnight calls from the police, no fights in the street. Instead, there were court dates, doctor appointments, paperwork. Elaine needed more help than Ember's father was willing to give, and after they'd had the twins for a couple months, she left him. Caring for the children was easier on her own, which didn't mean it was easy. One day she drove by a church whose lawn was studded with crosses representing the souls of aborted fetuses. She called the pastor. "In my house there are a couple of babies that could've been aborted," she told him. "Now they're here, and I have to go to work." The next morning at 6:30 sharp, a lady from the church showed up to watch them, and she came back every day after that.
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After the twins were returned to their mother's care, Elaine was eager to get pregnant again. By now she knew she didn't need a man to raise a child, but she did need one to help her start the process. She spent a year and a half trying to meet someone the old-fashioned way but didn't have much luck. She asked Ember's father if he'd drop off some sperm at a nearby fertility clinic, but he asked too many questions about custody and child support. There were sperm banks, of course, but to Elaine they seemed so impersonal, not to mention expensive. As her fortieth birthday approached, she worried that her time was running out. Then she remembered this cute girl she knew from the beauty-pageant scene, where Ember had become a top national competitor. Elaine was friendly enough with the girl's mothers, so one day she asked, "How did your baby get here?" She glanced from one woman to the other. "Because I think you had to have some kind of help."

"And she just took me under her wing and told me everything," Elaine said. "All the real, raw details."

Like mattresses and houseplants, sperm donation has been disrupted by the Internet. The market demanded it: Supply at sperm banks is at a historic low, in part because average sperm counts have steadily declined for more than four decades—probably due to environmental factors—and now many men no longer meet the banks' strict standards. And nonwhite donors have always been underrepresented.

As an alternative, many people are turning to social media for direct-to-consumer sperm via Facebook groups like USA Sperm Donation, Real Sperm Donors, and Miracle Baby. Their members include potential donors as well as people who want to get pregnant but don't have ready access to viable sperm: infertile couples, queer couples, trans men, single mothers by choice. In the groups, they seek donations from people like Kristian (six-foot-one, slender, hazel eyes, excellent sperm count, recent STD tests) and Alex (six-foot-three, perfect SAT scores, athletic). Compared with sperm banks, which keep donors anonymous, the men on Facebook are much more open: A donor might show a potential recipient pictures of other children he's conceived, chat with her via DM to see if they vibe, and invite her to join a private Facebook group for the parents of the children he's fathered. And unlike sperm banks, where a single specimen can run upward of $1,000, the Facebook donors generally provide their sperm for free, other than reimbursement for travel and other expenses.
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sperm donor shortage facebook

In the Sperm Donation USA group, Elaine Byrd learned things about sperm that amazed her.
ANDREW HETHERINGTON
The idea of a known donor appealed to Elaine. Ember knew her father, even though she didn't live with him; Elaine wanted her future children to have that opportunity, too. Ideally, she decided, she wanted a donor who would remain in friendly, loose contact with his offspring. By 2018, Elaine was spending hours each day in the Facebook groups, considering potential donors. She learned the subculture's argot and saw hints of the complications that the pageant mom had warned her about. AI meant artificial insemination, typically performed using a soft cup, a vessel that looked like a diaphragm, into which the donor ejaculated. NI stood for natural insemination—i.e., sex, which some donors insisted was the more effective method, since some sperm die when exposed to air. Other donors shipped sperm, but that got expensive: dry ice, overnight delivery. One guy in Atlanta was known as the Uber Donor: He'd jerk off into a cup and send the sample via car service.


Though the groups had tens of thousands of members between them, the donor pool wasn't as big as it initially seemed. Three quarters of Sperm Donation USA's members were people seeking donors, just like Elaine. She discovered that finding the right candidate among the limited options was tricky. There were donors who struck her as genuine: They talked about how they'd joined the groups after watching their friends or sisters struggle to conceive. But some had murkier motivations. From other women, Elaine heard stories of guys who'd ghosted, or turned creepy, or refused to take an STD test. Some would pretend to be okay with AI but, at the last minute, insist on NI.

And then there was this one white man whose name kept popping up. Ari Nagel, forty-six, was tall, with blue eyes, a wide smile, and soft, graying curls. Over the past decade, he'd had more than fifty donor children and was something of a celebrity in the world of sperm donation. He didn't offer his services in the groups because he didn't have to; women sought him out. Dozens of mothers vouched for him online. Elaine, who is Black, appreciated that he was a math teacher and didn't mind that he was white—so was Ember's dad. She looked Ari up on Instagram, where his handle was CuteProfessor, and on Facebook, where it was NicePerson. Almost all the photos featured his donor children—so many beaming, beautiful babies.

In December 2018, Elaine messaged Ari on Facebook. When he didn't reply, she reached out again. "Hey, I've been trying to get up with you for a minute," she wrote. She told him that she had some questions for him.

"Sure," he replied. "U can ask anything."

Rest of article: https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a37982793/sperm-donor-shortage-facebook-groups/
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
Before Covid, Devin and Shawn regularly socialized with other parents who'd used Ari's sperm. They referred to one another's children as their nieces and nephews. The women called themselves Ari's baby mamas, and around sixty of them were members of a private Facebook group where they planned playdates and got into fights and talked about what it was like when a teacher asked their kid to draw a picture of his family and he needed extra sheets of paper to fit everyone in. Some of the families had joint birthday parties and went on group vacations; women banded together to throw a new mother a baby shower. "We will always support each other, because so many people in the outside world are against us," Devin told me. "Nobody else knows what it's like to be an Ari baby mama."
If I could just be a fly on the wall in that group lol.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
I'm not surprised. But Ghengis Khan has over 1M descendants. This is going to be similar. 2nd and 3rd cousins in that area gonna be co-mingling and not even know it.

Ari's children and grandchildren will really need to keep in touch or they are going to be the DNA-joke's of society in the next 20 years. I say this because right now I'm in a DNA detective's FB group and its absolutely horrid. Its horrid right now for donor-conceived people who are meeting their 1/2 siblings through commercial sites like ancestry....some of them are realizing their sperm donor made other donation kids, but sadly, they went on and eventually got married and had kids within the marriage. Many times their donor has passed away or is like really old and the kids and grandkids do all the communicating These 1/2 siblings are ripping them a new one and telling the donor-conceived children to GTHOOH. Very suspicious the donor child wants money or access to their family for dubious purposes. The donor-conceived children are 30-40+ years old, simply trying to learn their heritage or blood line (am I Jewish? German? etc.) and its a mess. That's not including the 50-60 yo people learning they were not their dad's child but mama's indiscretion and daddy is really some Italian she met on a holiday or biracial man who used to tend to their garden/yard in the 60's or 70's. Of course the sneaky link's real family is like WhoTF are you?

I just don't see the benefit of this AT ALL. Other than for the mother. It just really takes something out of procreating. But oh well.
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
I'm not surprised. But Ghengis Khan has over 1M descendants. This is going to be similar. 2nd and 3rd cousins in that area gonna be co-mingling and not even know it.

Ari's children and grandchildren will really need to keep in touch or they are going to be the DNA-joke's of society in the next 20 years. I say this because right now I'm in a DNA detective's FB group and its absolutely horrid. Its horrid right now for donor-conceived people who are meeting their 1/2 siblings through commercial sites like ancestry....some of them are realizing their sperm donor made other donation kids, but sadly, they went on and eventually got married and had kids within the marriage. Many times their donor has passed away or is like really old and the kids and grandkids do all the communicating These 1/2 siblings are ripping them a new one and telling the donor-conceived children to GTHOOH. Very suspicious the donor child wants money or access to their family for dubious purposes. The donor-conceived children are 30-40+ years old, simply trying to learn their heritage or blood line (am I Jewish? German? etc.) and its a mess. That's not including the 50-60 yo people learning they were not their dad's child but mama's indiscretion and daddy is really some Italian she met on a holiday or biracial man who used to tend to their garden/yard in the 60's or 70's. Of course the sneaky link's real family is like WhoTF are you?

I just don't see the benefit of this AT ALL. Other than for the mother. It just really takes something out of procreating. But oh well.
Name of the FB group please. :sekret:
 
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