Canola Oil: Who's uisng it in their hair?

Discussion in 'Hair Care Tips & Product Review Discussion' started by BraunSugar, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. BraunSugar

    BraunSugar New Member

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    I'm watching Dr. Oz and according to him, canola oil penetrates the scalp & hair folicles (I am repeating what he said LoL). How many of you have tried it? I cook with canola oil as an alternative to vegetable oil. I eyed it up a few times but ultimately passed on using some for my hair :lol:. Anyway if you have used it, tell me about it!
     
  2. pringe

    pringe New Member

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    i haven't but if someone does I would like to hear it!
     
  3. NJoy

    NJoy Here I grow again!

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    I heard that too but, he sort of said it while rushing on to the next person. And, he admitted that he was the only one who didn't know about vinegar (closing the cuticles). I think research or clarification is needed. I usually trust what Dr Oz says but, I questioned whether he overspoke.
     
  4. naturalTAN

    naturalTAN New Member

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    I used it a couple times after my mom finished up our evoo. It was ok at sealing, but it did leave my hair pretty shiny. I wouldn't recommend for super fine-haired ladies because it felt heavy on my hair.
     
  5. BraunSugar

    BraunSugar New Member

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    I'm fine haired, so I may have to pass...
     
  6. OsnapCnapp!

    OsnapCnapp! New Member

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    BraunSugar Ha ha its funny you made this. I put some canola oil---cooking oil----in a bottle of water and used it because I couldn't find my other spritz. Its pretty good.
     
  7. kupenda

    kupenda Well-Known Member

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    I haven't before but I plan to. As soon as I get up from under this dryer...


    Sent from my iPhone using LHCF
     
  8. MrsSmitty77

    MrsSmitty77 New Member

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    Gosh, I am sad to hear this is not good for fine hair ladies. (thought I had a 32 ounce gem sitting in the pantry).:look:
     
  9. ManeStreet

    ManeStreet Well-Known Member

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    I've used it and liked it. Its not as heavy as olive oil and it absorbed right into my hair. Give it a try there no harm. If u google it, there's a lot of good info on it. I recommend it. I only used it for sealing so far not oil rinses or dc.
     
  10. faithVA

    faithVA Well-Known Member

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    I may have to try this. We cook with it but not often enough and it keeps going bad on us. I'm going to check this out when I get home and if the bottles still any good will try it for my next oil rinse. I'm in braids now and an oil rinse before braid take down will be perfect.
     
  11. Fhrizzball

    Fhrizzball Well-Known Member

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    I mix it with olive oil to thin it out and it's pretty good. I haven't used it alone though.
     
  12. faithVA

    faithVA Well-Known Member

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    Ok we really must not be cooking at all. We didn't have any type of oil anywhere in the kitchen but I have 5 bottles of different oils in my bathroom. :nono:
     
  13. lamaria211

    lamaria211 Well-Known Member

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    i found this i thought it was interesting,

    Canola
    I was recently horrified when a local news segment featured a doctor talking about heart health and he said Canola oil was a better choice than olive oil because olive oil had some saturated fat. I could not disagree more. While I don’t think the occasional use of Canola oil is the worst thing a person could do, I would heartily recommend olive oil over Canola ANY day. The following article is from the Natural News Network (a link to the article appears at the end):

    Canola Oil: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Corn oil comes from corn: sunflower oil from sunflowers, sesame oil from sesame seeds, peanut oil from peanuts, olive oil from olives, Canola oil from…Canolas? What is a Canola? And why is the word “Canola” capitalized?

    Canola is an engineered plant developed in Canada. The oil is derived from the rapeseed plant (an excellent insect repellent, by the way.) The rapeseed is a member of the mustard family. Rapeseed oil has been used extensively in many parts of the world, namely India, Japan, and China. Before the rapeseed was genetically engineered, about two-thirds of the monounsaturated fatty acids were erucic acid. Erucic acid was associated with Keshan’s disease, a condition which is characterized by fibrous lesions of the heart. In the late 1970s, Canadian plant breeders were able to create a variety of rapeseed which produced a monounsaturated oil which was much lower in erucic acid. This “new” oil was originally called LEAR oil (Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed.) Neither “rape” nor “lear” created an appealing image: hence, Canola …(”Canada” and “oil.”)
     
  14. lamaria211

    lamaria211 Well-Known Member

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    contd,
    he good:

    Canola oil is marketed as an oil very low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat. Diets high in saturated fats have been blamed for the incidence of higher levels of heart disease (although recent research is supporting the value of select saturated fats such as grass-fed beef and organic butter.) Studies involving a traditional Mediterranean diet which is naturally high in monounsaturated fats are pointing to lower rates of both cancer and heart disease.

    Canola oil also possesses a beneficial omega-3 fatty acid profile. Recent research touts the myriad benefits of omega-3’s.

    Polyunsaturated oils have recently come under increased scrutiny. Yet, studies involving olive oil, a monounsaturated oil, point to positive health benefits and disease prevention. Being that Canola oil is a monounsaturated oil, this may make Canola oil superior to other polyunsaturated oils such as sunflower, corn, and safflower oil.

    Canola oil is, for the most part, tasteless, — making it a good choice for baked goods.

    The bad:

    Canola oil took the market by storm, as it is relatively inexpensive to produce, especially compared to olive oil. Olive oil has a long history of scientifically documented health benefits. The problem with olive oil is that there is not enough olive oil in the world to meet the industry’s needs. In addition, olive oil is too expensive to use in most processed foods. Canola oil has filled this need for a mass-produced, publicly acceptable form of a monounsaturated oil.

    Olive oil is the gold standard, documented with extensive research. Quality olive oil (Extra Virgin, Cold-pressed) is manufactured by this simple process: The olives are pressed, the oil collected. The food oil industry is promoting Canola oil as an equally healthy twin to olive oil. This is deceptive, as there are few studies involving Canola oil and human health. (Numerous animal studies point to serious and deleterious effects of canola oil on rats and pigs.)

    In addition to the genetic modification, the process of making Canola oil is troubling. The procedure involves a combination of high-temperature mechanical pressing and solvent extract, usually using hexane. Hexane! Even after considerable refining, traces of the solvent remain. Like most vegetable oils, Canola oil also goes through the process of bleaching, degumming, deodorizing, and caustic refining, at very high temperatures. This process can alter the omega-3 content in the oil, and in certain conditions bring the trans fat level as high as 40 percent.

    The Ugly:

    It is becoming increasingly difficult to find products that do not contain Canola oil. A popular “crafty” mayonnaise brand boasts the phrase “With Olive Oil,” along with a picture of an olive and olive leaves on the front label. Upon reading the fine print in the ingredients on the back label, you discover that Canola oil is listed at the top of the long paragraph, olive oil near the end. Even worse are products promoting that they are made with olive oil, yet listed in the ingredients, the manufacturers state: “May include olive, Canola, or sunflower oil.” The consumer thinks they are buying salad dressing made with olive oil, yet it could be Canola or sunflower oil. This is insulting to the health conscious population.

    Canola oil is victim to both hype and hoax. To view both the hype and the hoax, visit Snopes.com and type in: “Canola Oil.”

    The only way to prove either hype or hoax is to do more human studies evaluating the safety of this mass-produced and consumed human-engineered oil. The FDA claims that genetically altered/engineered foods are perfectly safe. (They made this same claim with Thalidomide and Vioxx.)

    At least the FDA has taken a stance to protect babies from the unknown risks of Canola oil. The FDA prohibits Canola oil from being used in infant formula. Shouldn’t we know why?
     
  15. blueberry2118

    blueberry2118 Active Member

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    I tried it nothing special. It is just like EVOO and other types of oils I use, but it is cheap.
     

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