Split Ends vs. Weathering

Discussion in 'Hair Care Tips & Product Review Discussion' started by prettypithy, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. prettypithy

    prettypithy New Member

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    Last time I was at the salon, my stylist told me I had splits.:sad:
    I monitor my hair very carefully and had not seen any splits. I seldom use heat.:perplexed
    She showed me that the ends of my hair were a bit lighter in color than than the roots and that this was damage. But again, I could see no splits and the ends are thick and don't feel rough.
    Do I really need to trim or is this just normal weathering?
    I have not trimmed since February but am planning to trim when I next straighten my hair (August or September).
     
  2. bebee10

    bebee10 Member

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    I would think it is obvious to know what is a split end because isn't the end of the hair "split"... I get sooo nervous with stylist these days because they are all so scissor happy. I'd say use your own judgement because you deal with your hair 24/7... If you don't think it needs to be trimmed then your best judgement is more than likely correct.
     
  3. Your Cheeziness

    Your Cheeziness New Member

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    Imo, Trimming is meant to be preventative to splits and breakage, not just a fix for tattered ends.

    If you can't see all of your ends you can get a second opinion via consultation. But weathering is two steps from breakage. The ends are weaker and more susceptible.
     
  4. howyoudoin

    howyoudoin Member

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    why not just dust the frayed parts?, isnt the damage going keep traveling further up your hair if you dont.
     
  5. Nonie

    Nonie Well-Known Member

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    I agree. :yep:

    Weathering ends and split ends are synonyms of the same thing happening to the ends of your hair. It is because your ends are old that they start to wear away.

    The wearing away means they dry and chip off like a dead leaf, cuticle tears off, cortex ruptures, and what follows is what we see as a split end--a weak end transfers this damage up further up the strand to become the split end we see. Or it tears away before it's gone too far leading to thin ends we also see.

    Not trimming off any of the ends I just described is just as bad as continuing a habit of smoking when you have lung cancer. Best believe that any part of the strand that's not a whole (like the arms of that fork you call a split or the thin ends left behind after a split tears away) are weak and will break off inevitably. If you leave them to their own devises, the break is so rugged it just encourages more of the same. If you trim with a pair of sharp scissors, you create a smooth end that isn't rugged and so that slows down the damage.

    Splits don't just show up when you see a Y at the ends of your hair. That Y started at a scale you could not see, so waiting to see it, is just insanity to me. @Your Cheeziness worded it best, "Trimming is[...] preventative [...] not a fix". You snip off the beginning of that weathering before it has a chance to get so big that you can see the split. And by doing that, you leave an end that is stronger and more durable because it's a WHOLE end, not pieces of an end. And in the long run you retain better than if you were waiting to cut the damage off when it's grown to a visible point.
     
  6. prettypithy

    prettypithy New Member

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    Thank you. I always thought of splits as the Y, or other similar deformities of the strand. Since, I didn't see them I thought maybe the hair was fine. But you're saying if left unchecked, those "Weathered ends" will deviate into one of the strand defomorities more commonly identified as split ends. Got it.

    Now the question is how much to cut. The "weathering" was apparent on the last inch or two of hair but, ahem, that seems like a lot. Maybe I'll do an inch to start. Darn it.:sad:
     
  7. Your Cheeziness

    Your Cheeziness New Member

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    Again (imo), trimming half the damage is like not trimming at all. Weathering is normal, it happens. You should trim above damage to prevent it from spreading. You wouldn't amputate half if a diseased leg because you didn't want to lose all of it would you? (I know, gross, but still.)
     
  8. Nonie

    Nonie Well-Known Member

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    @prettypithy IMO, if it's been while since you last trimmed or if you didn't get rid of all previous damage--not always easy to tell unless someone is looking for you, so sometimes you may have to go by a hunch of how your hair looks and feels and behaves to know how much of your ends are not right--then you may find this first trim (First as in, "since you understood how this works") may be a huge one. Once you get rid of all damage that you have now, the trick now is follow the rule that "prevention is better than cure" and start to take measures so you never have to cut that much again.

    First make it a point to moisturize and seal ends to preserve them. (If you think of hair as a cylinder, the end is open so is the first to lose moisture even from the inside...and so it needs all the TLC it can get). Then if you can protective style (meaning, wear your hair in styles where your ends are protected, at least most of the time even if not all the time, you further help preserve your ends by keeping them from rubbing on your clothes (friction wears them down) and from the elements (wind and sun are elements that help things dry.)

    Next, you set a dusting schedule. Remember "dusting is cutting off a sprinkling of your hair" and it's way smaller than a trim. Until you feel comfortable with something different, to start off you could use the guide that many people preach and follow (It's the one I use): that is, dust off a tiny bit every 6-8 weeks. People panic when they hear the advice to trim off 1/4 inch in that time. But if you take your ruler and look at what is being asked of you, it's this much __. That's all you'd be loosing in 6-8 weeks. Hopefully that will take care of the problem and be enough to preserve your hair.

    You may find a little more than that is what feels right to you. But start off with that little...and if you still spot splits down the road then maybe you need to dust at 6 weeks not 8. But I can assure you that by trimming sooner than when you NEED it, you will be cutting off way less than you were doing waiting to do a proper trim when things look bad. And even if you find you end up cutting the same amount as when you wait, that your hair didn't get a chance to get weak in the first place means less of it broke off on its own...so really, you are retaining better.

    I share the story of how I confirmed this theory to be true in a few posts. Here's one: http://www.longhaircareforum.com/showpost.php?p=10375716&postcount=9

    HTH

    ETA: Just wanted to add that some people will tell you that trimming that much would just be trimming away your growth. Not true. Waiting is way more likely to cost you your growth. If you dusted 1/4 inch every 2 months (8 weeks), in a year, that's just 1.5 inches trimmed. And if you took great care of your ends and had full retention of what you didn't cut, then in one year at average growth, you'd have 4.5 inches; in two years you'd have gained 9 inches; in 3 years, 13.5 inches. And icing on the cake is: see-through ends or unsightly ends will not be something you will have to deal with.

    E (again) TA: @Your Cheeziness, I just saw your post after submitting mine and have to ask: can you please be my editor? :notworthy You're like that pill my doctor ordered to cure verbosity. :lol: (I think I'ma start making Polyjuice potion to take just before I start posting to become you. Can you please send me some of your hair by owl before midnight please?)
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2011
  9. prettypithy

    prettypithy New Member

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    I'll trim what needs to be trimmed and then endeavor to trim more often.
    Do you trim your own hair? 6-8 weeks for me would require salon trips and I'm not interested in visting the salon every 6-8 weeks. But I generally visit the salon quarterly so I think moing forward, I will just trim at every salon visit.
    I have not had any issues retaining length or with thin ends but I don't want to set myself for an eventual set back. I'm concerned because I swim often and am pretty sure that the chlorine is what is causing the damage despite appropriate washing, conditioning, sealing, moisturizing, low mani, ps, etc. So, maybe trimming more frequently is the only way to address the problem.
    Clearly, 6 months is too long to wait between trims, in any event.
     
  10. prettypithy

    prettypithy New Member

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    Someone's getting all excited for the next Harry Potter installment. :grin: I just watched the Harry Potter marathon on ABC family this weekend so I didn't even have to click the link to remind myself what polyjuice potion was. :lachen:
     
  11. Your Cheeziness

    Your Cheeziness New Member

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    LOL girl you are hella wordy sometimes, but I enjoy your posts so I endure. :lachen:
     
  12. Your Cheeziness

    Your Cheeziness New Member

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    I don't trim my own hair. Me and scissors don't get along. I also don't trim on a schedule, I trim when I need to. The tale-tell sign I need to trim is when my ends tangle more easily and/or my hair won't hold a curl as well.
     
  13. Twinspired

    Twinspired New Member

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    Sent from my PC36100 using PC36100
     
  14. SuchaLady

    SuchaLady Well-Known Member

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    Hair just gets old. I too notice that the very tips of my strands are much thinner than the hair further up. I am pro-trimming because when that piece of thinner hair does finally break off it will indeed take some newer hair with it. This is why I understand why some people trim regularly. If clipping off a quarter of an inch of hair can save you an inch or two in the future I say go for it.
     
  15. Nonie

    Nonie Well-Known Member

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    :giggle: @Your Cheeziness Girl, in my defense, when we were supposed to have the foundation of the art of summarizing instilled in us in elementary or was it high school, we didn't have a teacher for half a year so I missed that boat. And you can't teach an old dog new tricks.

    What's more, I learn best when things are broken down to me, so in my effort to do unto others as I'd have them do unto me (ie be thorough)....:blah: Yeah. :look: (Thankfully, it's not always in vain; some patient souls, believe it or not, actually read it all and drop me a PM to say thank you. :grin: )
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2011
  16. Esthi777

    Esthi777 Well-Known Member

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    Nonie. I always love it when you chime in. I find myself reading threads and thinking, "ask Nonie, she'll know!". I have learned so much from reading your posts. BTW, I love the long-windedness :)
     
  17. WyrdWay

    WyrdWay Well-Known Member

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    My older hair used to be lighter in color because the sun had bleached it a bit
     
  18. Nonie

    Nonie Well-Known Member

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    Hi :wave: @Esthi777 :blowkiss: You say the nicest things. (I still remember the very first PM you ever sent me; your very first words to me. :kiss: )
     
  19. divachyk

    divachyk Instagram: adaybyjay

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    bump - as of late, I've seen strands as long as an inch with what appears to have a white end. At first, I thought it was tiny shed hairs. After further review, I truly think it's splits that are found about an inch up the shaft. The tiny pieces have a white tip on one end and a regular tip on the other (a tip that resembles a healthy end). The white tip kind of resembles a bulb but it is quite too short to be a shed hair unless it's coming from my nape which I don't believe it is. I've tried looking at the hairs in a magnifying glass but the verdict is still out. I plan to trim next week as it's been a while since I've had a trim.
     

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